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The Great Comic Book Cover Homage Streak: Week 109

It occurs to me that it seems like many comic book covers are homages. Which is fine with me. I have no problem with it. It just made me think, though, how long could I go before I hit a week where NO new comic book was released that had a cover that was an homage to something? Let’s find out! Here is an archive of all the cover homages featured in the streak so far!

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The Case of the Missing Rabbit

I am going to pretend that the absence of David Branstetter’s “Case of the Missing Rabbit” piece in this week’s Line it is Drawn was all part of the plan, so that I could reveal it to you all here now…
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Year of the Artist, Day 297: Lee Moder, Part 4 – Days Missing #3

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Lee Moder, and the issue is Days Missing #3, which was published by Archaia and is cover dated October 2009. Enjoy!
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Cross-Hatchings for October 2014

Bits and pieces. This-n-that. Wonder Woman, the Shadow, and two-fisted time travel. Continue Reading »

Comic Book Legends Revealed #494

Welcome to the four hundred and ninety-fourth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous four hundred and ninety-three. This week, did Twin Peaks almost continue as a comic book? Does Marvel really have a trademark on the words “thwip” and “snikt”? Was Bobbi “Mockingbird” Morse’s debut published six issues after her first appearance?

Let’s begin!

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The Line it is Drawn #212 – The Comic Book Detectives Are On The Case!

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page… http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas, Sonia Harris, Melissa K. and Ken H.

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our blog sketch artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post them here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The topic is…

For our annual Halloween edition, place comic characters into famous horror stories, whether they be novels, short stories, movies or television shows

Read on for the sketches that came about courtesy of the last question/challenge!

It’s True Comic Book Detective time! Pick a solo comic book character and then come up with some sort of comic book-related case that you’d like to see them solve. Just a case title and our artists will figure out the rest. For instance, “Hawkeye and the Case of the Faulty Quinjet” or “Spider-Man and the Case of the Vanishing Wife.” So your tweet should be in the format of “(Name of Superhero) and the Case of (Whatever you Want the Case to Be)” This is a SECRET Theme week, also! Our own Chaz suggested that we not spoil the fact that our heroes are not solving these cases alone. No sir, it is our second annual JOHN MUNCH WEEK! Yep, the longtime TV detective will be teaming up with our heroes in each piece this week!

Enjoy!
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Year of the Artist, Day 296: Lee Moder, Part 3 – Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. #0

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Lee Moder, and the issue is Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. #0, which was published by DC and is cover dated July 1999. These scans are from the Starman Omnibus volume 5, which was published in 2010. Enjoy!
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1987 And All That: X-Factor #12-23

A column in which Matt Derman (Comics Matter) reads & reviews comics from 1987, because that’s the year he was born. Click here for an archive of all the previous posts in the series.

XFactor1X-Factor #12-23 (Marvel) by Louise Simonson, Marc Silvestri (#12), Walter Simonson (#13-15, 17-19, 21, 23), David Mazzucchelli (#16), June Brigman (#20), Sal Buscema (#22), Bob Wiacek (#12, 14-15, 17-19, 21-23), Dan Green (#13), Joe Rubinstein (#16), Randy Emberlin (#20), Petra Scotese, Joe Rosen, Bob Harras

I tend to enjoy any comicbook that looks at the inescapable personal torments, damaged relationships, and psychological strains of the superhero lifestyle. Secret identities, an endless and self-feeding cycle of violence, taking on the impossible responsibility of keeping the rest of the world safe—it’s bound to take its toll on anyone, and it’s nice when a narrative acknowledges that. X-Factor #12-23 digs deep into these superhero problems and their consequences, then piles on several other whole sets of problems, too. There is, of course, the classic conundrum of humans fearing/hating mutants no matter what they do, which is amped up more than usual in this particular series because of its foundational concept of X-Factor pretending to be mutant hunters. Though less explicitly discussed, there’s also an argument embedded in these issues that the whole idea of gathering mutants together and training them to use their powers and fight evil mutants might be flawed, that Xavier did both harm and good with the original X-Men and now, as X-Factor, those same characters are repeating his mistakes with a new generation. Then again, there’s no better alternative offered here, because if not protected, nurtured, and taught control, the young mutants of the world could potentially do massive damage without even meaning to. So X-Factor presents a pretty dreary interpretation of the mutant-heavy reality of the 1980′s Marvel Universe, one where there may not be any truly good choices for mutantkind to make, especially because, in that world, superpowers almost always lead to superheroics (or supervillainy), which in turn lead to their own significant stresses, injuries, etc. Continue Reading »

Year of the Artist, Day 295: Lee Moder, Part 2 – Batman: The Last Angel

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Lee Moder, and the issue is Batman: The Last Angel, which was published by DC and is cover dated September 1994. Enjoy!
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Committed: The Unfolding Layers of Alex + Ada

102214_AlexAda1Alex + Ada is one of the very few stories that I cannot wait for, and so I’m reading every 20 pages in each monthly installment. I hate waiting a month, so I definitely couldn’t wait for the trade paperback. You’re lucky though, because if you’re interested in jumping on now, the first 6 issues have already been collected into the first volume.

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Year of the Artist, Day 294: Lee Moder, Part 1 – Wonder Woman #73

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Lee Moder, and the issue is Wonder Woman #73, which was published by DC and is cover dated April 1993. Enjoy!
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Foggy Ruins of Time – The George R.R. Martin X-Men Reference No One Ever Gets

This is the latest in a series giving you the cultural context behind certain comic book characters/behaviors. You know, the sort of then-topical references that have faded into the “foggy ruins of time.” To wit, twenty years from now, a college senior watching episodes of Seinfeld will likely miss a lot of the then-topical pop culture humor (like the very specific references in “The Understudy” to the Nancy Kerrigan/Tonya Harding scandal). Here is an archive of all the Foggy Ruins of Time installments so far.

Today, based on a suggestion by reader Garvis, we take a look at a Chris Claremont reference to the novel that almost destroyed George R.R. Martin’s career…
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Year of the Artist, Day 293: Joe Quesada, Part 5 – Amazing Spider-Man #544

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Joe Quesada, and the issue is Amazing Spider-Man #544, which was published by Marvel and is cover dated November 2007. Enjoy!
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3 Chicks Review Comics – Episode #073

It’s EPISODE #073 SPOOKTACULAR EPISODE (or something)3 Chicks Logo 2 - Blue

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON PODBEAN

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Inside this episode! 

We begin with a review of Emily Carroll’s most excellent graphic novel Through The Woods, a collection of terrifying beautiful tales by Margaret K. McElderry Books! We’ve also got a review of Marguerite Bennett, Jorge Coelho, and Noelle Stevenson’s Boom! series Sleepy Hollow. Next up we have an interview this week with the lovely and charming Ming Doyle. Ming talks all about her upcoming series from Vertigo The Kitchen with writer Ollie Masters, her experiences in the industry, her process, and what she’s up to next. Sue and I also talk about all the cool news that came out of NYCC, and about how much better The Flash tv show is than Gotham. We had some small echoing problems this week, but hopefully it’s not too bad. I am choosing to think of it as “texture” and “effects” for our “spooktacular episode.”

3 Chicks Review Comics is a podcast featuring female comics lovers and bloggers. Sue from DC Women Kicking Ass and Kelly Thompson from She Has No Head! Tune in to CSBG every other Monday at noon as we review comics and discuss hot topics of the week. In addition to the blogs above, you can also follow us all on twitter as well: Kelly and Sue.  Special thanks to Caanan Grall for our incredible 3 Chicks Logo and to Nik Furious for our awesome 3 Chicks theme song.

Episode 073 Covers

The Great Comic Book Cover Homage Streak: Week 108

It occurs to me that it seems like many comic book covers are homages. Which is fine with me. I have no problem with it. It just made me think, though, how long could I go before I hit a week where NO new comic book was released that had a cover that was an homage to something? Let’s find out! Here is an archive of all the cover homages featured in the streak so far!

Continue Reading »

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