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CSBG Archive

Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #63

This is the sixty-third in a series of examinations of comic book urban legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous sixty-two.

Let’s begin!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Yellowjacket II was originally going to be a member of the Thunderbolts.

STATUS: True

On a newsgroup a few years back, Paul Hartshorne wrote that he read somewhere that “Kurt Busiek originally intended Yellowjacket to be a Thunderbolt, only to have to replace her with Songbird at the last minute.”

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Busiek wrote back with: “Hardly the last minute; it didn’t take long to notice she was dead. If she was alive I’d have used her, but she wasn’t, so she got shuffled out very early on in the creative process.”

4811_20060402180327_char.jpg

Later on, in response to a question of what he would have done with the character, Busiek stated:

Not in the context of the series; we didn’t get that far. I’d worked out some stuff for her for an earlier proposal, in which we would have found out that Rita deMara was a dead friend of hers whose identity she’d swiped while running from the mob, and her past was rather more shadowy than heretofore suspected (which would have resulted in her being very gregarious, but guarded of her true self, and felt guilty over what she’d done to Rita’s memory), but that was well before she got dragged into GUARDIANS, so I have no idea if any of that could still have been used.

Interesting stuff.

It’s a shame, too, as I enjoyed Yellowjacket II.

Luckily, we got Songbird out of it!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: J.M. DeMatteis had to toss out a plot involving Dr. Strange’s father due to the title’s imminent cancellation.

STATUS: False

Commenter SanctumSanctorumComix asked me awhile ago,

At the end of the Doctor Strange : Sorcerer Supreme series, when J.M. DeMatteis came on board, he was going to deal with Strange’s life from “waaaay back”.

It was supposed to be something where it was revealed that Strange’s father had NOT died (way back in Doc’s early “selfish Dr.” days), but was, in fact just ABOUT to die and DOC goes back home to deal with this.

Then, I guess the “cancellation” notice came thru and it rushed itself off into a weird story of Mordo begging forgiveness, and Doc dealing with the Cython mess in the final issue.

Oddly enough, the COVER to issue #86 has DOC kneeling over the dying body of an old man while Mordo’s face gloats in the sky.

3645_4_86.jpg

Scene never happened in the book.

Anyone know of this storyline’s true purpose?

I HAVE to think that J.M. had a PLAN that was just tossed due to looming cancellation.

I posed the question to Mssr. DeMatteis, and he was kind enough to go into great detail on the subject:

It’s been a while, but one thing I do recall is that I did indeed plan on having Doc’s dad in the story-which is why his father ended up on that cover (which had to be done before the plot was even written)-and then someone found out that Dad was dust. Which is why Doc’s parents show up as ghosts (of a sort) in the actual story. I can’t swear that’s how it happened (it was ten or so years ago) but that’s the best recollection I can muster.

As for what the story was supposed to be re: Strange’s father. I think my idea was that Dad was an alcoholic, arrogant, abusive bastard…the role model for all of Stephen Strange’s worst behavior…and Strange had to face, and transcend, that history, ultimately forgiving his dying father. (Little known fact: Some time in the 90′s, Marvel hired me to write a treatement for a Doctor Strange movie and this father-son dynamic came directly from that treatment.)

As you can see, the changes had nothing to do with cancellation. The cancellation did change my other plans for the series-as I was asked to jettison whatever I had in development and tie up lots of loose ends that I didn’t care, or really know, about (like Wong’s relationship with Imei, the fate of the Tempo and Victoria Montessi’s demon-inspired pregnancy). They turned out to be pretty good stories, but not the stories I wanted to tell.

3645_4_90.jpg

Final piece of trivia: The plan, after cancellation, was to do some Dr. Strange one-shots. I actually wrote one, it was drawn (perhaps even lettered) and, for reasons that remain a mystery, it never saw print.

C’est la vie!

JMD

Thanks a lot, J.M.!!

So there you go – that about explains that “mystery”!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: The first appearances of the Squadron Supreme in the Avengers were “crossovers” with the Justice League of America.

STATUS: True

What this really goes to show is how much effort Roy Thomas was willing to go to to have a little joke – and that joke has created characters who are still popular today!!

In late 1969, Roy Thomas and Denny O’Neil got to talking. Each man wrote the respective “big team book” for Marvel and DC, so wouldn’t it be neat if they had a wink-wink-nudge-nudge crossover of the two books?

And in late 1969, they did….of sorts.

Roy Thomas (presumably because he had a lot more freedom) was a lot freer with his half, as in Avengers #70 (cover dated November 1969), he had the Avengers face off against the Squadron Sinister – who were essentially evil versions of the DC heroes Superman, Batman, Flash and Green Lantern.

1571_4_070.jpg

The only problem was that when it came time for Denny O’Neil to reciprocate, presumably because he had a little more editorial intereference (didn’t want to piss off Julie Schwartz, naturally), the Justice League half of the “crossover,” in #75, was decidedly sparse.

1449_4_075.jpg

In the issue, the JLA face off against evil counterparts of the Justice League themselves. Evil Batman, evil Hawkman, etc. And each of the evil JLAers was SUPPOSED to represent an Avenger.

To whit, evil Batman throws a garbage can lid at Batman – because he’s representing Captain America.

Evil Hawkman mentions how he is a “Man of Iron” (or maybe he actually said “I am an Iron Man,” I don’t have the issue in front of me at the moment). In any event, barely anyone noticed it.

A little more than a year later, though, Thomas, who must have liked the gag, tried it AGAIN – this time with the NEW Justice League of America writer, Mike Friedrich.

This time, it was in books cover-dated February 1971, and the Avengers (once again), in #85, featured a version of the Justice League – this time, instead of the Squadron Sinister, Thomas introduced their heroic counterparts, the Squadron Supreme.

1571_4_085.jpg

Likewise, the Justice League, in #87, found themselves meeting the Heroes of Angor, representations of Thor, Quicksilver, Yellowjacket and Scarlet Witch, respectively

1449_4_087.jpg

(here is a pic of the group, courtesy of wikipedia):

Heroesangor.jpg

The Squadron Supreme (AND Sinister) went on to become prominent members of the Marvel Universe (and Keith Giffen and JM DeMatteis even managed to bring two of the Angor characters, Blue Jay and Silver Sorceress, into the fold), so the crossovers worked THAT way, at least!!

Well, that’s it for this week, thanks for stopping by!

Feel free to drop off any urban legends you’d like to see featured!!

74 Comments

When I first saw the Angor characters in the Giffin/DeMatteis League, I knew they were old JLA villains, but I never made the Thor/Scarlet Witch/Yellowjacket connection. Cool. An excuse to read them again.

Please, sir, may we have some more on alternate versions of the JLA and Avengers?

Wonderful installment, as always.

Minor correction: Giffen and DeMatteis brought Wandjina into their run on Justice League. He does come back (however briefly) after the events of their first JL TPB.

Ooooh. I didn’t know the Angor characters had life before JLI. I did catch the Avengers similarities, though. I was just reading those issues the other day. Great stuff.

Are Blue Jay and Silver Sorceress still around somewhere in the DCU or are they dead?

I’d like to know if KISS actually mixed in some of their blood into the printing ink for their comics back in the 70s. I assume it’s completely false, but it’s an urban legend that’s still being bandied about today.

“I’d like to know if KISS actually mixed in some of their blood into the printing ink for their comics back in the 70s. I assume it’s completely false, but it’s an urban legend that’s still being bandied about today.”

It’s not an urban legend, it was one of the selling points of the book. Why do you assume it was false? It was mentioned on the front cover (above the title) and there were pictures inside of the band getting their blood drawn.

If, for some reason, it wasn’t true, then it’s not an “Urban Legend”, it’s a “scam”, since the magazine’s creators went to great lengths to make us think it was true, but the burden of proof is definitely on those who would say it isn’t true in this case.

Wow, I consider myself pretty well versed in most things DC, and I knew most of that stuff, and I didn’t realize that the Angor characters were around before JLI either.

I liked it when they continued to add newer and newer JL characters to the Squadron, to the point that eventually, they’d have to get to Blue Jay and Silver Sorceress. And then what would they do?

Heck, Blue Jay actually lead the JLE for a while, which is mindboggling in its own way.

There was at least one JLQuarterly story that expanded on the Angor heroes. I recall a version of Ironman named Tinman, and I think there might’ve been others. Interesting that they changed Jack B. Quick to “Captain Speed” post-Crisis.

Jack B. Quick never quite made it into the DeMatteis League, but the other three did. Wandjina and the Silver Sorceress died, but Blue Jay is still around someplace, and I hope DC uses him for something because I always liked the guy.

SanctumSanctorumComix

August 11, 2006 at 9:42 am

ThanX!

Glad to get that decade old mystery out of the way.

Now…if they would just release the unpublshed special edition issue.

;-)

~P~
P-TOR

I can’t imagine designing a character named “Silver Sorceress” and not making any of her costume, you know, silver.

Actually in the issue where Silver Sorceress dies, we find out the reasoning for the gold outfit. It is explained that she was color blind and had no idea that her outfit was the wrong color.

“I can’t imagine designing a character named “Silver Sorceress” and not making any of her costume, you know, silver.”

Maybe it was a reference to the Scarlet Witch’s green costume. She did have a green costume early on, right? I’m not hallucinating?. Because if I am, disregard.

Quicksilver wore green. The Witch was the best scarlet they could manage– purple and red.

Yeah, I didn’t know those guys existed before JLI. I think Jack B. Quick showed up for a few panels just to die or something. It’s been a while.

Why couldn’t it be false? How could the ink be tested for KISS blood? If I knew advertising blood in the ink would sell a book, I’d make that claim too.

I think it would be a fun urban legend to discuss is all. A good companion piece to the Mark Grunwald ashes in the ink for the Squadron Supreme book. If nothing else, it gives Marvel quite the air of ink ingenuity.

I love when a writer and/or artist says, “Fuck the red tape, we can do this; and in a fun way!” in regards to crossovers. I remember loving all the marvel riffs in the Authority arc where Jack Kirby is the villain.

On a similar note, wasn’t once inferred that Mr. Mxyzptlyk and the Impossible Man were one-in-the-same?

-Steve!

Concerning the unauthorized Avengers/JLA cross–overs, back in the mid–to–late 70s, there was a storyline in DC’s Freedom Fighters, a series starring some old Quality Comics heroes first revived in the 1973 JLA/JSA team-up, that featured unmistakable versions of Cap, Subby, and I think one other Marvel character. I myself don’t remember anything else about it, as I didn’t follow that book (saw a house ad for it at the time; the GCD indexes don’t help any further as for these issues they have only cover scans—which shows the Cap character only—story titles and credits) but it seems relevant, or at least analogous.

Nice one about the Avengers/JLA. Have versions of the X-Men appeared in DC books? I know the Shi’ar are supposed to be the Legion, would be cool if the Titans or some other group fought the “Y-Men.” How about the FF? Planetary’s got the only FF analogues I know.

Cyborg Superman/Hank Henshaw is Reed gone wrong.

The Freedom Fighters battled heroes who represented Captain America and Bucky, Human Torch and Toro, and the Sub-Mariner, who were being featured in the Invaders over at Marvel. They called themselves the Crusaders.

Meanwhile, the Invaders battled a team of Crusaders: The Spirit of ’76, Captain Wings, Dyna-Mite, Ghost Girl, Thunder Fist, and Tommy Lightning, who represented members of the Freedom Fighters.

Weren’t the Hybrid in New Teen Titans an X-Men stand-in?

The Hybrid were an X-Men stand-in, to the point that Mar v Wolfman and Ed Barreto actually put Mento in a wheelchair for the duration of the arc.

The Titans also had an earlier pseudo-crossover with the DNAgents, who appeared in the Titans as “The Recomnatants” while the DNAgents comic faced a set of genetically-created Titans-stand-ins.

Here we go, Scarlet Witch is wearing green on the cover to X-Men #4.

http://www.marveldatabase.com/wiki/images/thumb/d/de/Uncanny_X-Men_4.jpg/180px-Uncanny_X-Men_4.jpg

She’s also in green on #5, but has switched to red by issue 7. I have no idea what color her costume inside the book, since I’ve only seen the covers and b&w reprints.

I don’t know if that’s true, but the Titans did a “crossover” with Eclipse’s DNAgents. One of the teams was called Project Youngblood, IIRC.

Concerning the KISS comic, I’ve seen the video of their trip to the printing facility, with Stan Lee, no less. They all stood over the ink vat and dropped in the blood. Gene Simmons and crew know a publicity opportunity when they see it.

The dysfunctional Doc Strange/his dad dynamic that JMD created in a screenplay did eventually work its way into the comics, in UNCANNY ORIGINS #12. It’s not a classic by any stretch of the imagination, but when I weeded out the long-boxes a few years ago, I couldn’t bring myself to chuck it out.

No one’s mentioned the Extremists yet? Lord Havok, Dr. Diehard, Gorgon, Tracer, and Dreamslayer have one claim to fame that none of the Angor or Squadron heroes do: they appeared on TV, in the “Shadow of the Hawk” episode of JLU.

In answer to an earlier poster’s question: Yes, the Superman story ‘Krisis of the Krimson Kryptonite’ (most unfortunate acronym ever) had Mxy tied up with an engagement elsewhere, so he used his powers to create magical “red kryptonite” and gave it to Luthor, with said Kryptonite having the power to permanently remove Superman’s abilities. Several scenes showed Mxy transporting himself to his other engagement by “popping” into another universe, and his colors changing to green and purple (at one point, he says “I almost forgot my appearance in that other universe! I swear, it’s almost IMPOSSIBLE to remember what I look like there!”) There’s also a scene where he’s in the middle of fighting his “friends” in the other universe–they’re all conveniently off-panel, but the dialogue is vintage Fantastic Four. (Eventually, BTW, Luthor gloats to Clark Kent about his victory over Superman…which breaks the spell, as Mxy’s one condition to Luthor was that he couldn’t tell Superman. Supes gets his powers back…but not before he’s proposed to Lois Lane.)

Of course, the Silver Surfer/Superman crossover kinda negates this by having the two meet–then again, it’s not impossible to think that they might regularly impersonate each other as well. SS/S definitively states that they can move, unaided, between the DC and Marvel continuities.

Oh, and to add goofy cameos to the ever-growing list–both Peter Parker and Reed, Sue, and Franklin show up in the Hawk and Dove mini-series (the Kesel/Liefeld one.)

Well, Clark Kent’s turned up umpteen times in the MU – in Simonson’s Thor and Avengers, Claremont’s Excalibur, MTU and X-Men, the Busiek/Ross Marvels and a few other scattered issues, sometimes with Lois in tow. He even danced with She-Hulk at one point.

Oh, and Hal Jordan was in an asylum in PAD’s Hulk, talking about his ring…

During the Peyer/Moder “LSH in the 20th century” arc, there was in fact an X-Men analogue team called the Knight Watch (it might’ve just been Night Watch, but I THINK there was a K). They revealed that Ferro had escaped from a crooked orphanage/treatment center for meta kids with unfortunate powers, run by “Doc 30″ who was wheelchair bound and had the power to force anyone to believe something for 30 seconds. There was a Cyclops (Taser, who had electric tentacles that came out of his eye sockets), a Wolverine, a Beast and a couple others. Ferro’s brother Ingot (who had the same powers as Andy) wanted desperately to be a member, as their Colossus. The whole issue was frickin’ weird.

Not only is Cyborg Superman/Hank Henshaw an evil “Reed Richards,” but he received his powers when exposed to freak radiation during a Space Shuttle flight. He had three fellow crewmembers, one of them female, who also received strange abilities (only to die shortly thereafter, I believe…I’m not sure). There’s DC’s Fantastic Four!

Great stuff Brian,

speaking of blood I seem to remember a story about Ron Wagner mixing his blood into the inks on an issue of Morbius. Of course this might of just been a joke(its a vampire book) that I’m remembering wrong.

So we know that Spider-Woman 2 (Julia Carpenter, the West Cost Avenger introduced in the first Secret War, currently going by “Arachne” in Civil War) wears a black costume with a big white spider on the chest – the same look that Spidey would also adopt, and which now belongs to Venom. The kayfabe reasoning was that he was “subconsciously influenced” by her costume when he got his new one, but what’s the real-world story? In short:

Is it true that Jim Shooter saw the character designs for the soon-to-be-introduced Spider-Woman and liked the motif so much that he co-oped it for Spider-Man? (since the black costume actually debuted in ASM before it showed up in SW, I seem to remember)

The Heroes of Angor had enemies of their own, one of which (Lord Havoc) is featured on that cover. They were The Extremists, and they showed up a lot in JLI later on; Maxwell Lord even took over Lord Havoc’s identity or something I dunno.

Lord Havoc : Doctor Doom
Dr. Diehard : Magneto
Dreamslayer : Dormammu
Tracer : Sabretooth
Gorgon : Doc Ock

They also fought PAD’s Matrix/Danvers Supergirl. Somewhere along the line they all ended up being androids and their world had been destroyed… except for Dreamslayer, he was real.

History of Angor Timeline URL:
http://blaklion.best.vwh.net/timelineAngor.html

- – - –

More recently, in the Superman / Batman comic, there was another Marvel crossover with a whole different team that then got rectonned out of continuity because it was yet another stupid Joker / Mxyzptly thingey.

I believe Snopes did the KISS comic one, which is why I haven’t touched it.

But I reserve the right to use it in the future if I ever feel strapped for one! :)

In regards to the green Scarlet Witch:

I used to have both X-Men #4 and X-Men #7, and I can confirm that Wanda’s costume inside the book was pink and red.

As to why: I seem to remember reading somewhere or hearing somewhere that Wanda was sometimes colored green on the covers to balance out the composition. As I recall, both #4 and #7 have red or reddish backgrounds, and somebody thought Wanda would blend in too much if she was red also. So she was green.

Maxwell Lord, taking on a villain’s persona? That’s so out of character for him!

“Actually in the issue where Silver Sorceress dies, we find out the reasoning for the gold outfit. It is explained that she was color blind and had no idea that her outfit was the wrong color.”

No foolin’? That’s pretty awesome.

“Not only is Cyborg Superman/Hank Henshaw an evil “Reed Richards,” [...] There’s DC’s Fantastic Four!”

The three others did, in fact, die, and Henshaw ended up in a computer. Never thought that done-in-one story would end up as the origin for a ridiculous Superman villain when I read it a billion times as a seven-year-old me, but here we are.

My only problem with that explanation for the Silver Sorceress is… what? Her teammates couldn’t be bothered to tell her “Uh, hey, you’re actually the Golden Sorceress”? What jerks. Maybe they all liked to laugh at her behind her back.

Tom Fitzpatrick

August 12, 2006 at 6:02 am

Three urban myths:

1) Marvel has never intended to publish the final chapter to “The Last Galactus Story” serial that ran in Epic Illustrated magazine. True or False?

2) Jim Starlin has never intended to finish his star-spanning cosmic saga “Metamorphosis Odyssey.” True or False?

3) John Byrne’s adult comic series JB’s Next Men was cancelled by Dark Horse Comics due to pressures by Marvel.
True or False?

There you go. Good luck.

The JLA/Avengers tie-ins was interesting reading. I have another cross-over that no one has mentioned. In the old Gruenwald penned Marvel Comics “Quasar” #17, there was a race to determine the fastest runner the Marvel Universe. The winner was a nameless blonde man in a tattered costume, obviously the Barry Allen Flash post-Crisis on Infinite Earths.

In that issue of Quasar, the Barry Allen character is asked what his name is and where he’s from… he acts disoriented and says he can’t remember his name… but that it sounds like “Buried Alien.” He actually reappeared later in the series with a new name (Inertia perhaps?). I believe Gruenwald did confirm it was Allen in some interview before his death.

Peter Parker has made several Daily Planet cameos in the last few years as well.

Glenn Simpson:

Now that you say it, that the Freedom Fighters thing was an Invaders knock–off comes back to me, but I had absolutely no idea of the reciprocation in the Marvel comic. Thank you very much for both the memory prod and the totally new info.

I believe it was GL #12(2006) that had a rather clever visual allusion to the whole Cyborg Superman/Reed Richards thing.

Don’t know if this marvel / dc “crossover” has already been dealt with, but the shi’ar imperial guard in X-men (around issue 107?) were a thinly veiled version of the Legion. The Legion were supposed to do an x-men version but it got morphed into the assassin crew that included Blok.

The DNAgents crossover with the The New Teen Titans was #48, they were called “The RECOMbatants”.

The DNAgents published issue #14 at the same time featuring Teen Titans analogues “PROJECT: YOUNGBLOOD”.

(Liefeld watchers should note this given the fact that Youngblood was initially proposed as a Teen Titans spinoff which eventually became Team Titans).

“Concerning the unauthorized Avengers/JLA cross–overs, back in the mid–to–late 70s, there was a storyline in DC’s Freedom Fighters, a series starring some old Quality Comics heroes first revived in the 1973 JLA/JSA team-up, that featured unmistakable versions of Cap, Subby, and I think one other Marvel character. I myself don’t remember anything else about it, as I didn’t follow that book (saw a house ad for it at the time; the GCD indexes don’t help any further as for these issues they have only cover scans—which shows the Cap character only—story titles and credits) but it seems relevant, or at least analogous.”

Are the GCD indexes similar to the indexes ICG put out in the mid/late 80′s? Is there a site to see them at? Can I have the link please?

“The Freedom Fighters battled heroes who represented Captain America and Bucky, Human Torch and Toro, and the Sub-Mariner, who were being featured in the Invaders over at Marvel. They called themselves the Crusaders.

Meanwhile, the Invaders battled a team of Crusaders: The Spirit of ‘76, Captain Wings, Dyna-Mite, Ghost Girl, Thunder Fist, and Tommy Lightning, who represented members of the Freedom Fighters.”

As a small side note of the Crusaders that fought the Freedom Fighters, the leader of the group (Americommando) was actually a villain named the Silver Ghost who had fought the heroes before on his own and was only after them because he was hoping that they could lead him to another hero that had journeyed to Earth-1, The original Firebrand… SG was Firebrand’s arch-enemy… The only thing I am not sure of is if they were acquainted with each other before DC purchased Quality comics.

Speaking of Superman cameos, Clark, Jimmy, and Lois are all at the big ball introducing the Ultimates from Mark Millar and Brian Hitch.

Brian Cronin wrote:
I posed the question to Mssr. DeMatteis

Please, please, please, if you cannot use the proper form, do NOT use the abbreviation.
The PROPER abbreviation for the French word monsieur is simply M.. The *plural* form of the word, messieurs, is MM., though English does make use of “Messrs.” (derived from messieurs) as the plural for “Mr.”, but “Mssr.” is simply nonsensical.
Also, in French, an abbreviation only uses a period when the last letter of the abbreviation is not the final letter of the word (the abbreviation for madame is Mme–sans point, as the French would say) and it’s traditional for the first letter to be capitalized.

Brian wrote.
Speaking of Superman cameos, Clark, Jimmy, and Lois are all at the big ball introducing the Ultimates from Mark Millar and Brian Hitch.

They were also in an issue of Millar’s MK Spiderman run, I dont remember exactly when though, I just remember seeing them.

If I recall correctly, the Titans issue with the “RECOMbatants” was drawn by Steve Rude in a (then) rare bit of DC work.

I always wondered about Blue Jay’s and the Sorceress’s origins, ever since I saw them in JLE.

Good stuff. Thanks.

-West

There was some sort of situation where Aquaman had a mystery villain who was shown having a bare hand with an ornate gold wristband, pushing a button that set off an explosion. And either at the same time or soon afterwards, Sub-Mariner had a story with a mystery villain who also pushed a similar button, with a green glove. Somebody else probably knows more about this than I.

Long before the X-Men fought the Imperial Guard, the Legion pulled a Marvel crossover with the Fatal Five, who are pulled from the Masters of Evil:

Emerald Empress = Enchantress
Persuader = Executioner
Validus = Radioactive Man
Tharok = Baron Zemo
Mano = Melter

That preceeds the other unofficial crossovers by a few years, I think.

There was some sort of situation where Aquaman had a mystery villain who was shown having a bare hand with an ornate gold wristband, pushing a button that set off an explosion. And either at the same time or soon afterwards, Sub-Mariner had a story with a mystery villain who also pushed a similar button, with a green glove. Somebody else probably knows more about this than I.

You remember correctly, Glenn! That was the basis for an Urban Legend that I did awhile back!

Click http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2005/09/15/comic-book-urban-legends-revealed-16/
for the lowdown!

Are the comments all in italics for everyone else?

How odd.

Yeah, the pissy French guy appears to have messed up the tags.

Let’s see if this fixes it.

If you finish something in italics, everything below it goes into italics. Stupid WordPress!

Okay, so I edited it – so it looks normal now.

Thanks for the heads up, folks!

Brian,
Love your column. My query: ads appeared in various Marvel titles in February 1981 for Frank Miller’s Dr. Strange, yet no issues ever appeared. This was in the midst of his first run on Daredevil. I don’t recall ever seeing more than the ad, which itself was beautiful. Internet searches reveal no inof. Did I miss your mention of this and if not, do you know what happened to what would have been one fantastic, trippy title?

David

Thanks, David!

And yeah, I remember those awesome looking ads. I believe it was actually going to be Frank Miller DRAWING Dr. Strange with Roger Stern staying on as writer.

Since it was a bi-monthly back then, that would be how Miller likely would work it into his schedule.

In any event, I never did a bit on that one because I am pretty sure the answer was just, “Yeah, he got too busy so he couldn’t do it,” ya know?

I don’t THINK there’s any cool story to why Miller didn’t becoming Dr. Strange’s artist.

But tell ya what, I will dig a little into it!

It must have just been a case of scheduling, because the issue he was supposed to begin his run is the issue that Marshall Rogers took over the art, which was actually pretty nice.

Kyle Baker’s Plastic Man had a faux-Fantastic Four. PM went to hide in monastery, and the three monks there had powers. There was Ephemeral Monk, and I don’t remember what the other two were named. Something like Flaming Monk and Invincible Monk. Together, the four of them comprised a goofy version of the FF. It was pretty funny.

SanctumSanctorumComix

August 19, 2006 at 10:27 am

I had read…SOMEWHERE…about Frank Miller suddenly deciding that he couldn’t do DR STRANGE.

It wsn’t any great mystery or conspiracy.

Someone (him, editor, Stern…someone) changed their minds and/or schedule.

But I DO recall the ads AS WELL AS the back cover for the DR STRANGE calendar.
THAT was a sweet piece of art.

Also, to add to your crossover thread, WONG (and what was left of the Sanctum) was seen in an early KYLE RAYNOR Green Lantern (issue 58 ?) story (with Felix Faust).

Kyle is wondering around Greenwich Village and can’t find his bearings (despite having a friggin ring that can guide him thru star systems).
He bumps into an asian gentleman wearing a green outfit (WONG) who walks with him to his new building (above the Coffee Shop).
Along the way “Wong” mentions to him that “it’s a STRANGE neighborhood” or some-such, as they pass the ruins of the Sanctum Sanctorum (which had recently been destroyed in the M.U).

And it seems that WONG (and the Sanctum) ALSO appeared in the 01991 CHALLENGERS OF THE UNKNOWN mini (by Loeb and Sale).

~P~
P-TOR

Here’s one that’s not a CD/Marvel crossover but a Peter David crossover: When David was writing both DC’s Star Trek and First Comics’ Dreadstar he ran the same storyline in both books with the visiting characters acting as villains. The Star Trek crew were pretty funny looking as I recall.

Speaking of David, he did a funny non-crossover in Young Justice where we see one side of a phone conversation between Snapper Carr and Rick Jones. Snapper is nonplussed when “RJ” can top all the recent crazy events in his life. David was also writing Captain Marvel at the time, so I wonder if the other side of the conversation was shown there.

On another note, Busiek’s rejected plot for Yellowjacket is basically the plot of the current Ant-Man series. What is it with Hank Pym’s identities getting stolen from dead people?

- Z

Brian, Gotta say I’ve been reading on and off ever since my brother showed me this during a visit during christmas and thank you for the hours upon HOURS of entertainment and enlightenment.

Heck.. the link to “Life of Reilly” helped clean up a good 4 years of comics in my head… mostly… kinda…

As far as the Silver S… They should get their facts straight… from one color-blind person to the next I highly doubt you’ll ever find one who can’t tell the difference between silver and gold… and here (especially after fidning out about Donald Duck out sciencing chemists) I thought comics ALWAYS did their research ;D

Again, wonderful article.. you’ve got a few more loyal readers (and possible wise-asses)

-ritch N

Daniel Of Dreams

October 3, 2007 at 12:47 am

Not an actually crossover but a case of an Marvel character being “borrowed” in a DC Comic. I can’t believe no one mentioned Kingdom Come.
It’s all about the comic industry in the ’90s right?

Take a good look at Magog…
Metal arm? check.
Bionic eye with scar slashing across it? check.
One giant shoulder pad? check.
Bare chest? check.
Assorted (and useless) belts, pockets and holsters? check check and check…

Seems clear Mr Waid and Mr Ross knew who the REAL villain of the day was. ;)

I remember that issue that Steve Rude drew of the Titans. The most beautiful issue of the Titans not done by George Perez :)

I always thought it was clever of Byrne to use the Legion of Super-Heroes as a stand-in for the Fantastic Four in Superman. I’ve heard people say it was just Byrne being lazy and re-using a cover, but he chose the Legion characters quite specifically. Blok=Thing, Sun Boy=Human Torch, Invisible Kid=Invisible Woman and Brainiac 5=Mister Fantastic.

Talk about the ultimate hidden crossover within a crossover…

Check out the covers for Superman #8 (http://image.milehighcomics.com/istore/images/fullsize/83756635410.8.GIF)

and Fantastic Four #249
(http://image.milehighcomics.com/istore/images/fullsize/30929984076.249.GIF)

Henry Benton Jr

May 17, 2008 at 11:45 am

Just wanted to add in to the whole unofficial crossover thing adding in the whole Mr. Mxyzptlk/Impossible Man thing.

Hello there! This blog post couldn’t be written any better! Going through this post reminds me of my previous roommate! He always kept talking about this. I’ll send this post to him. Pretty sure he will have a good read. Thank you for sharing!

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