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CSBG Archive

Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #68

This is the sixty-eighth in a series of examinations of comic book urban legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous sixty-seven.

Let’s begin!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: M.I.T. once cribbed design work for a multi-million dollar grant from a comic book!

STATUS: True

It’s hard to believe, but the Massachusetts Institute of Technology actually used comic book art to help them land a gigantic government grant from the US Army – and they did so without permission of the artists OR crediting the artists!!

Their victims?

Ray and Ben Lai.

Here is the account of the situation, courtesy of Reuters, back in 2002:

MIT engineers borrowed design elements from from an Image comic book when submitting their winning bid for a grant to develop high-tech super soldier armor according to a report from the Reuters newswire service.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology acknowledged this week that artwork from the comic Radix helped them land a $50 million grant from the U.S. Army. The institute’s proposal featured a future female soldier in high-tech gear, looking very similar to the comics’ cover art featuring the main character Val Fiores. The image featured armor, head-gear and even backgrounds which have many similarities to artwork found in Radix #1.

Radix creators Ray and Ben Lai were alerted to the swipe by fans who saw the MIT design. While the institute claims it was an “innocent use,” the comic’s creators are concerned that it could interfere with their ability to capitalize on the concepts they created.

Ray Lai told Reuters that there’s been much interest in the comic from Hollywood with several studios coming after the property. “That’s why it’s very important for us to clear the air and come out and say ‘We didn’t copy MIT; MIT copied us,’” he said. “We could still file a lawsuit. We’re weighing our options.”

radix1.jpg

And a follow-up from the Associated Press, a week later (thanks to Comics2Film for the article links):

A professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has issued an apology to Ray and Ben Lai, the creators of the comic book Radix, over the unauthorized use of their designs in a military grant proposal, according to a recent Associated Press report.

As was reported last week, MIT incorporated armor designs from the comic book in a proposal for a $50 million government grant. The Institute won the bid to develop a super-soldier armor that would enhance strength, allow for some form of invisibility as well as many other fantastic features.

The comic creators were shocked to see their designs incorporated into the proposal, and feared that it could jeopardize their plans to exploit their concept in various formats including feature film.

Now, Edwin L. Thomas, director of MIT’s Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, has issued a public apology, sent via e-mail and also posted on the MIT website. “If I had known it was your work, I would not have used it,” Thomas said to Ray Lai. “MIT strongly supports the rights of creators and greatly regrets using the image without permission or credit. I am very sorry that this happened; it won’t happen again.”

However, the Lai brothers are not completely satisfied. The apology came five months after they issued a complaint to MIT. Furthermore, the apology was not circulated as widely as the dubious image.

“If MIT was to do the right thing, they would put out a press release like they did before,” Ray Lai said to the Associated Press. The Lai brothers expect some financial compensation for the blunder as well as an acknowledgement of wrongdoing from MIT as an institution.

radix_1.jpg

I do not know what the current state of the situation is (or even where the Lai Brothers are nowadays). Anyone happen to have an update?

Thanks to Robert Pincombe for reminding me of this one in the comments section.

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Mario Puzo once wrote comic books.

STATUS: False.

One of the interesting things about the early days of comic books is the fact that there was SO many comics coming out that it was just too lucrative of a field for most down-on-their-luck creative types to turn down.

As mentioned in a previous installment of Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed, Mickey Spillane worked writing comic books.

One writer, though, who has been identified over the years as working in comics but never actually did, is Mario Puzo, famous author of The Godfather.

puzo96.jpg

The confusion likely comes from the fact that Puzo DID work for Martin Goodman, publisher of Marvel Comics, but Puzo wrote for Goodman’s men’s magazines, not his comic book division.

Puzo recollects the period in this excerpt from his biography, The Godfather Papers,

I was willing. I had a ten-page outline–but nobody would take me. Months went by. I was working on a string of adventure magazines, editing, writing freelance stories and being treated by the publisher, Martin Goodman, better than any other publisher I had every had. I was ready to forget novels except maybe as a puttering hobby for my old age.

But one day a writer friend dropped into my magazine office. As a natural courtesy I gave him a copy of The Fortunate Pilgrim. A week later he came back. He thought I was a great writer. I bought him a magnificent lunch. During lunch I told him some funny Mafia stories and my ten-page outline. He was enthusiastic. He arranged a meeting for me with the editors of G. P. Putnam’s Sons. The editors just sat around for an hour listening to my Mafia tales and said go ahead. They also gave me a $5,000 advance and I was on my way, just like that. Almost-almost, I believed that publishers were human.

As soon as I got my hands on the Putnam money, I naturally didn’t work on the book. (Luckily part of the advance was payable on the handing in of the complete manuscript or I would never have finished it.) The thing is, I didn’t really want to write The Godfather. There was another novel I wanted to write. (I never did and now I never will. Subject matter rots like everything else.)

All my fellow editors on the adventure magazine told me to get cracking on the book. They all were sure it would make my fortune. I had all the good stories, it was writing to my strength. Everybody I knew was sure it was the right thing to do and so finally I started. And quit my job.

It took me three years to finish. During that time I wrote three adventure stories a month for Martin Goodman on a freelance basis.

So close to writing comics, but so far!!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Fantastic Four was snuck on to the schedule against the terms of Marvel’s distribution deal.

STATUS: True.

As pointed out in an older installment of Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed, there was a period in time when Marvel Comics were distributed by Independent News (which was part of DC Comics), and Marvel had a restriction on how many titles they were allowed to publish. Therefore, Marvel had to be quick about deciding which titles to keep and which to drop.

At first, Marvel was held to eight comic books a month. Marvel had their titles be bi-monthly, so Marvel had a “Sweet Sixteen” of sorts. That was the case for a few years (the situation began in 1957), until late 1960, where presumably they noticed that certain titles just sold better than others, so Marvel reconfigured their output.

They made some of their books monthly (their three biggest sellers – Strange Tales, Journey Into Mystery and Tales to Astonish, plus a few books that did not stay consistent, such as Kid Colt, Outlaw and Tales of Suspense) and then just rotated the extra spots on the order.

Marvel actually skipped publication in December of 1960, which gave them some leeway with publication for the beginning of 1961 (they also had the option of making request to Independent News for temporary increases in their allotment).

However, in the case of Fantastic Four #1, as reported in Jordan Raphael and Tom Spurgeon’s “Stan Lee and the Rise and Fall of the American Comic Book,” what Marvel did was to just sneak the book on to the schedule without notifying Independent News.

1482_4_0001.jpg

They just put it on to their schedule without moving anything around – and when it was clear it was a success, then they started clearing other titles off the schedule (Teen-Age Romance, for one, ended only a few months later).

The rest, as they say, is history!

Well, that’s it for this week, thanks for stopping by!

Feel free to drop off any urban legends you’d like to see featured!!

46 Comments

I have heard Stan Lee tell a story about Mario Puzo in which Puzo came to Stan and asked for some work. Stan says he gave Puzo a comic book assignment, but after a few days or weeks, Puzo came in and said he couldn’t do the job because writing comics was much harder than he had expected. The way Stan tells it, of course, that was the point at which Puzo decided to stick to novels and of course went on to write The Godfather.

It should be noted, however, that Mario Puzo did write the Screenplay for Superman: The Movie. To what extent his work remained in the first two Superman films may be debated (especially since Donner’s vision was admittedly very different), but I’d say that that might also contribute to the myth of his comic work.

From what I read in news reports and “behind the scenes” stories about the original movie, DC hired Puzo to write the screenplay just to get a big name on the ticket, so the movie would be taken seriously. And no one in the world was hotter than Puzo, because the GODFATHER movie had just rocked the world. But when Puzo’s script came in, he’d made Superman jokey, like the 1966 Batman (which was only ten years previous). The directors had to throw out the script and start over, but they kept Puzo’s name, again for seriousness.

CE
http://www.challengersoftheunknown.com

I remember reading an interview years ago (I think in The Comics Journal) with someone who worked for Martin Goodman at the time. He remembered that one day Frederico Fellini came to the offices. Everyone was excited, and the people who worked on the men’s and film magazines that had written about Fellini couldn’t wait to meet him (this, of course included Puzo). But all Fellini wanted to do was meet Stan Lee. The person telling this anecdote then explained it as the final motivation for Puzo to get working on his novel so that famous film-makers would want to meet with HIM too.

SanctumSanctorumComix

September 15, 2006 at 6:19 am

I think the Lai brothers were subsequently hunted down and “silenced” by agents wearing their stealth armor.

Odd story though.
As I always say;

“Life imitates Art”.

~P~
P-TOR

$50 million for a swipe? Wailt ’till Greg Land hears this…

I have heard the one about Puzo thinking it was too hard too. That doesn’t exactly fit into the above timeline though.

I didn’t read the full articles as I read them when the story came out, but I seem to recall something about one of the M.I.T.’s professors making the ‘designs’ that were really the Lais’ work and the actually people in charge, never really having any clue it was fake. I mean had YOU ever heard of Radix? I’d be inclined to believe my daughter. Of course, once they presented the copywrighted information it sounds like an open and shut case.

Last time I heard of the Lais was when they were doing work on the tail-end of Jurgens’ run on Thor.

The version of the Stan Lee/Puzo tale I’d heard was that Puzo couldn’t get his head around monthly deadlines. It’s not that it was “hard” except that script turnarounds were so fast.

Also, regarding SUPERMAN: THE MOVIE, I’d always heard that Puzo modelled his script after Greek tragedies. He wrote this big, serious epic about a messianic Superman who came to earth, forsook his mission for a woman and was confronted with the sins of his father.

And there wasn’t a joke in sight.

So WB hired more screenwriters to put humor into Puzo’s script, giving Luthor oneliners, introducing Otis and (at one point) adding a Telly Savallas cameo which was thankfully unfilmed.

Apparently Puzo didn’t take to the screenplay format too well, either:

“Stated Ilya Salkind, ‘The main problem, though, was the considerable length. It was over 300 pages long – it would have made a six-hour movie! Quite honestly, it was more a novel than a screenplay.’ Epic indeed.”
http://www.supermancinema.co.uk/superman1/general/scripts/evolution_of_a_screenplay/s1evol2.htm

And another site actually says that draft was *500* pages long!

(The standard Hollywood “rule of thumb” for screenplays is that a standard-format screenplay works out to about one minute of screen time per printed page.)

Those boys over at Radix need to learn that concept can’t be copywrited. If the guys at MIT were able to make a set of armor that incorporated boot jets and “repulsor rays” Marvel couldn’t go whining that Iron Man was being treaded upon. Many concepts have made their way from fiction to reality. Star Trek and floppy disks anybody?

The problem wasn’t that the basic concepts were being used, as these appear to be a basic ingredient of mech sci-fi from Iron Man to Evangelion. The problem is that their designs, which can be and are copyrighted, were outright stolen for the proposal. Which leads to my question, wouldn’t the military be a little nervous with trusting a group of scientist who had to steal their idea and designs from an Image Comic?

Hey, how about a link (if you covered it) to the inventions that were taken from Disney comic books (the inventor refused patents because of it)?

As was reported last week, MIT incorporated armor designs from the comic book in a proposal for a $50 million government grant. The Institute won the bid to develop a super-soldier armor that would enhance strength, allow for some form of invisibility as well as many other fantastic features.

Um, yeah, okay… the federal goverment hands out a fifty million dollar grant to MIT to develop some rhidiculously far-out sci-fi battle armor. Meanwhile, people living in Louisiana have to jump through flaming hoops to get even a pttance of government in aid in rebuilding after Hurricane Katrina. I tell you, it is @&*#ed up that the government’s priorities are so out of whack.

$50 million for a swipe? Wailt ’till Greg Land hears this…

HA!

What a line!

The way Stan tells it, of course, that was the point at which Puzo decided to stick to novels and of course went on to write The Godfather.

Hehe…naturally, of course.

Did you also hear that Lee inspired the painting of the Mona Lisa?

I remember reading an interview years ago (I think in The Comics Journal) with someone who worked for Martin Goodman at the time. He remembered that one day Frederico Fellini came to the offices. Everyone was excited, and the people who worked on the men’s and film magazines that had written about Fellini couldn’t wait to meet him (this, of course included Puzo). But all Fellini wanted to do was meet Stan Lee. The person telling this anecdote then explained it as the final motivation for Puzo to get working on his novel so that famous film-makers would want to meet with HIM too.

I can totally believe that. That was apparently a fairly common thing to occur (famous people wanting to meet Stan Lee).

Those boys over at Radix need to learn that concept can’t be copywrited. If the guys at MIT were able to make a set of armor that incorporated boot jets and “repulsor rays” Marvel couldn’t go whining that Iron Man was being treaded upon. Many concepts have made their way from fiction to reality. Star Trek and floppy disks anybody?

Oh yeah, a lot of their statements are fairly uninspired, but I cut them some slack as they were (as expected) quite defensive at the time, as they were really pissed off about their work being taken from them.

In any effect, their “legal claim” was not that their concepts were being used, but rather that quite literally, their copyrighted artwork was being infringed upon (the professor’s claims are probably accurate though, his taking the work off PROBABLY ended almost 99% of the problem – although I suppose they could push for the “defamation” angle – “people thought we ripped it off from you”).

>COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Fantastic Four was snuck on to the >schedule against the terms of Marvel’s distribution deal.

>STATUS: True.

actual status is: False

I thought this was hooey when i first heard of it; because there is no way to “sneak” a comic into a distributor. In order to credit returns (Ie: non-sales), it is strickly regulated. The number of periodicals to be sent to various local distributors is already set in advance.
Tom Lammers’ research shows that Marvel had the same number of comics out (11), several months before this. So they had no reason to sneak anything in. They still had the same number of comics that month. So there was nothing extra to sneak in.

I believe Marvel had 12 books ship FF #1′s month, which is one more than the highest they ever had (11), which I believe was one of the “special permission to exceed” instances, to launch Linda Carter. So suddenly, only a month or so after they had gotten permission to launch a new title (Linda Carter, Student Nurse), they now wanted to launch ANOTHER new title – and this was one that Goodman was not willing to wait on (he wanted a superhero book, and he wanted it bad).

So I think it fits in well with Raphael and Spurgeon’s assertion that Marvel took the extra one themselves with FF #1 (which is why I ran this bit – their research matched what I had researched).

That being said, this bit is not about me being right, it’s about the correct facts being stated, so if you can help me debunk it, I’ll gladly debunk it (heck, it’ll give me nice fodder for a future installment! :)).

Those boys over at Radix need to learn that concept can’t be copywrited. If the guys at MIT were able to make a set of armor that incorporated boot jets and “repulsor rays” Marvel couldn’t go whining that Iron Man was being treaded upon. Many concepts have made their way from fiction to reality. Star Trek and floppy disks anybody?

Mr. Cronin is right, the use of the image is the infringement. However, concepts from fictional works have been used by the US Patent Office to reject applications for inventions before. So the notion isn’t entirely without precedent

Case in point:
Robert Heinlein’s description of the modern waterbed in Stranger in a Strange Land, Beyond this Horizon, and Double Star. Charles Hall gets the credit for physically creating the waterbed, but Heinlein’s writing kept Hall from actually getting the patent.
Its all in the Wikipedia entry for waterbed

David C. quotes a website quoting Ilya Salkind on Mario Puzo’s Superman script: “It was over 300 pages long — it would have made a six–hour movie!” Then he quite rightly parenthetically acknowledges the “one scripted page=one minute of screen time” filmmaking formula. Call a spade a spade, man: this calls the authenticity of the quotation, and therefore the credibility of the site, into question.

The Telly Savalas cameo in Puzo’s script was described as coming out of Superman looking for Lex Luthor and sees a man who–from behind–looks like him, but turns out to be Savalas, in Kojak mode, with a lollipop and saying “Who loves ya, baby?”

Clayton Emery’s claim that the producer’s threw out Puzo’s screenplay entirely and started over doesn’t hold up. Mario was quoted at the time (i.e., when he was the only writer acknowledged to be on the project) as saying that unless the producers dropped it, Lois and Supes would sleep together (I believe that was HIS euphemism), which incited a good and well–publicized bit of outrage. This in fact DID happen in the first sequel, much of which was filmed at the same time as the original, as is very well known. A good deal of THAT material was thrown out and different sequences were shot by Richard Lester, but since the screen tests included as bonus material on the last VHS and first (still only?) DVD releases included Lois and Clark working undercover as a married couple at Niagara Falls and she finding out he is also Supes—albeit in a very different manner than what was seen in “S. II”—which on screen led directly to their tryst, it’s pretty clear that at least some of Puzo’s concepts—if nothing else–were retained. Puzo’s script underwent a heavy rewrite, yes, but it doesn’t appear to have been completely scrapped.

Tom McLean:
I have heard Stan Lee tell a story about Mario Puzo in which Puzo came to Stan and asked for some work.

Stan Lee told this story in a 60 Minutes interview:

http://sixtyminutes.ninemsn.com.au/sixtyminutes/stories/2003_07_27/story_914.asp

There’s something I’ve long wondered about FF #1, but I really don’t think it counts as an Urban Legend: why, in many reprints of that issue, is the policeman on the corner erased from the image?

Ted,
Another article, from Cinescape Magazine, actually upholds the “gargantuan Puzo screenplay” story, this time quoting Richard Donner directly:

” `It was a well-written script,` remarks Donner, `but it was a ridiculous script. For one thing, here was this producer, a guy named Pierre Spengler, who was going to supervise making this film for the Salkinds, and he had a 550-page screenplay. Well, number one, I said, `You can`t shoot this screenplay because you`ll be shooting for five years.` And he said, `Oh, no. It`s fine.` I said, `That`s totally asinine,` but that was literally a shooting script, and they planned to shoot all 550 pages. You know, 110 pages is plenty for a script, so even for two features that was too much.”

http://www.cinescape.com/0/Editorial.asp?this_cat=Movies&obj_id=19294&aff_id=0

I was thinking Superman must have been his first screenplay, but it wasn’t – he wrote the first draft screenplay for Irwin Allen’s Earthquake too. Not too much detail on it, but it sounds like it might have been a phone book as well:

“Fox was faced with a daunting task: Mario Puzo’s original screenplay was so complex, it was considered impossible to shoot at the time.”

http://members.aol.com/earthquakemovie/scripting.html

It *does* sound hard to believe, but the evidence for the claim seems solid enough. I do agree that they obviously didn’t “completely scrap” the script, but they by definition had to heavily rewrite it.

You can actually download the (199 pages in Word) next draft by the Newmans here:
http://www.supermancinema.co.uk/superman1/general/scripts/s11976.doc

I was the third member of the Radix team not mentioned in the above releases. The Lai brothers have moved on to big and better things since leaving comics. There were plans to revive Radix at a later date, but I haven’t talked to them in the last year or so. The last I spoke with Ray he was off making movies and pitching cartoon properties. He did graphic designs for “I, Robot” and I believe the last time I saw his name in credits was “X-Men 3″. I haven’t confirmed that was him though. After being burned by Crossgen, MIT, and Marvel I don’t blame them for picking up their toys and going elsewhere.

Also, the case wasn’t about them stealing concepts from Radix. Although there were similarities in the presentation that could have came straight from our comic or any armor-clad comic hero. The problem was they blatantly took our artwork and pitched it as their concept designs and credited it to someone else. Then ran the images in the AP. The person credited turned out to be the daughter of the person in charge of the proposal. You’d think a father would know how talented his daughter was. Sadly in order for us to do anything we needed a lawyer who had passed the Boston bar and do to the fact that MIT would drag the case out into legal hell there was no one willing to aid us.

Thanks for the update, Brian!

I have an urban legend that I would like to know the real story behind. Did the Comic Code Authority really sensor a panel in World’s Finest Comics #189?

I recall reading in Carmine Infantino’s book that he flew out to meet Puzo over a weekend and helped him re-write the Superman movie at the last minute. He was supposed to get a co-writing credit, but he was fired from DC soon afterwards and his contributions were never offically acknowledged.

David C.:

Obviously, I didn’t make myself clear. My point was simply to doubt the authenticity of the cited quotation due to its numbers being well off the movie industry formula of “one page of script equals one minute of screen time.” That the quote was on the whole essentially in line with the basic and general facts of the matter I freely concede, but it just isn’t plausible that a film professional would get that formula so wrong, unless Puzo was cramming huge quantities of description on each page so that he WAS well off the formula, and Salkind didn’t see any need to explain that to whoever he was talking with, which would certainly be understandable. THERE’S a theory that occurred to me just now. The more I think about it, the more I like it, as it makes nobody unethical or incompetent or whatever.

One other thing, David: Concerning “Earthquake,” do you maybe have the wrong film in mind? Irwin Allen had nothing to do with it, other than the fact that the success of his own disaster pictures inspired Universal to make it, and it WAS from Universal, not Fox. Perhaps Puzo wrote a draft of “The Towering Inferno”?

What was the story of Infantino’s reign and firing from DC, anyhow? It always seemed a little odd to me that he’d been in that position in the first place, knowing him only as an artist in the ’80s.

Ted, no, that was my confusion – I thought “Earthquake” was an Irwin Allen movie, and didn’t bother checking. But it was definitely “Earthquake” that Puzo wrote a screenplay for – I was just mistaken on who made that film. Check the link for further details.

Basically, all the stories of Puzo’s phone-book screenplays seem to vaguely tie in with the tale here to suggest that the novel was the only form he was really professionally competent with. I was thinking maybe his screenplays essentially *were* novels, albeit with slightly different text formatting, but Donner’s quote seems to suggest otherwise. (He seems to be saying “No, I’m not kidding, it was a 550 page *shooting* script!” )

The whole thing seems also to tie in with the current trend of “tourist” comic book writers, those who made their name in some other field.

the problem with debunking your FF 1 story is there is no way to debunk it, because the is no evidence to debunk.

An allegation has been made, without any evidence other than 2 ‘comics historian’ think so. No documents, no memories of the event, no bragging (while Stan Lee doesnt remember too much, you would think slipping one over INd would be one he might).
I asked the source of Raphael and Spurgeon’s comments (not sure if Doc wants his name tied to it here or not), and he admits that it was speculation (albeit he feels informed specuation).
Considering the way distribution is traditionaly handled, the story still makes no sense at all. The money doesnt flow that way.

David C.:

That was pretty stupid of me not to see that link for the Earthquake movie there. Very sorry. I’ll try to be more awake in the future, and that, of course, goes for anybody’s postings.

Hey Brian

I have one for you to check out

I had a very interesting conversation with a friend of mine today who insisted that Curt Swan died a divorced alcoholic because the steady work that he had gotten from DC had dried up.

Now I had never heard of this and argued with him for a while

So I went online searching, I searched high and low and finally found ONE source with that info. http://www.supermansupersite.com/swan.html

Now, I’m not one to take any info found at one site as gospel, but has anybody else ever heard of this ?

I just spent much of the weekend reading TwoMorrow’s “Krypton Chronicles” book (essentially an in-depth look at Superman in the Silver and Bronze age, with tons of interviews.)

Curt Swan is a very frequent topic of discussion in those pages, and nothing remotely resembling that story ever came up in any of them.

Which is not to say it couldn’t be true, and I don’t recall anyone saying anything that *refutes* such a story, exactly, but the general picture you get of him is of a smart, level-headed, gentlemanly guy.

Robert Pincombe

October 5, 2006 at 1:16 am

Hi!

Glad to hear my Radix suggestion worked out for you. I ‘m especially pleased it helped to wrap up what happened in the end. It’s true an idea cannot be copyrighted but printed/published art is automatically copywritten material here in Canada and I think once it’s it’s distributed, the same goes for the States (but I’m not sure).

Though the daughter led her father, and by extension, MIT, to believe the art was hers, they are complicit for not doing their due diligence. The art was taken off many months later but that no longer mattered since the need for the proposal was up. The Lais’ had a point about protecting their reputation. the resultant publicity was a two-edged sword. More people heard about them, but they were now associated with the theft of an idea; whether people knew it was stolen from them or thought otherwise.

I’m glad to hear they are doing well though I am curious what the final story of Radix would have been!

Robert

Hi! Very nice site! Thanks you very much! vhXMlsS7sUJoD

Wow, that “Radix” armor design is SO original, that I don’t see how anyone could design something even remotely similar to it! Oh, and “Radix” is also a character name from Dragon Ball.

Wow, that “Radix” armor design is SO original, that I don’t see how anyone could design something even remotely similar to it! Oh, and “Radix” is also a character name from Dragon Ball.

If you look really, really far in the sky, waaaaay over your head, you might see the point, which is not that they designed a similar armor, but that they literally appropriated the actual Radix drawings for themselves.

If someone was using the designs in a movie or a comic, something intended to actually be shown in public, I’d see the point.

And the DBZ Character is Raditz btw.

David C wrote on September 15, 2006 at 8:00 am
“Stated Ilya Salkind, ‘… It was over 300 pages long – it would have made a six-hour movie!
“rule of thumb” for screenplays is … about one minute of screen time per printed page.

Ted Watson wrote on September 15, 2006 at 12:56 pm
David C. quotes a website quoting Ilya Salkind on Mario Puzo’s Superman script: “It was over 300 pages long — it would have made a six–hour movie!” Then he quite rightly parenthetically acknowledges the “one scripted page=one minute of screen time” filmmaking formula. Call a spade a spade, man: this calls the authenticity of the quotation, and therefore the credibility of the site, into question.

There are two qualifiers there, OVER 300 pages and ABOUT one minute per page. So if you assume 64 seconds per page, you would need 338 pages. Over and about by my calculations.

LOL Magnus, nice reading comprehension skills.

“Wow, that “Radix” armor design is SO original, that I don’t see how anyone could design something even remotely similar to it! Oh, and “Radix” is also a character name from Dragon Ball.”

“If someone was using the designs in a movie or a comic, something intended to actually be shown in public, I’d see the point.”

First, they didn’t design something similar; they took art which someone else drew, and 1) claimed that it was their design and 2) credited the artwork to someone else(commonly known to those with common sense as plagiarism). The artwork then ran in the Alternative Press under said (incorrect) credit. They then received a generous amount of money for work based on a design which was not theirs. There is a reason those responsible apologized—it was a deplorable act, and certainly a shady thing to do, especially for someone who is supposedly intelligent and creative; it also calls into question(or at least, should) any other work these people have submitted as their own.

Try to at least read what you are so arrogantly trying to correct next time, or say nothing at all; opening your mouth, as the old adage warns, just revealed you to be a fool.

Just a nitpick, not actually an error. You said that Independent News was a part of DC Comics. Before the 1970′s, though, the company was known as National Periodical Publications, not as DC. Hmm…I wonder if there are any urban legends about comic company names?

David Bañuelos

May 16, 2012 at 5:23 pm

A late addition, but if anyone is still interested, here are a couple of articles with side-by-side images of the Radix and MIT art. The MIT artist did add a helmet and the words “US ARMY” on the gun.

http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2002/08/29-02.html
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2002-08-28-mit-soldier_x.htm

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