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CSBG Archive

Ten Goofiest Moments of the First Ten Issues of the Amazing Spider-Man

Here‘s the ten goofiest plot points in the first ten issue of the Fantastic Four, now it is Amazing Spider-Man’s turn!

It is remarkable to note, by the way, how few and far between the goofy moments came in Amazing Spider-Man. A LOT less than Fantastic Four. I do not know if that was Steve Ditko’s influence or what. Maybe it was because it came after Fantastic Four, so the kinks were out of the system. In any event, the book really isn’t that goofy. But I still managed to dig up what I find to be the ten goofiest plot points in the first ten issues of Amazing Spider-Man (and, again, we all understand these comics were meant to be read by children and it would never enter anyone’s brain at the time that people would still be reading them forty years later, let along picking apart the goofy elements of the story, so please realize that there is no maliciousness intended in this list).

Enjoy!

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Staged Photos

I should point this out, if only because it would rank pretty high otherwise (and I figure a few of you folks might mention it), but in the first few issues, there are a couple of instances where Spider-Man basically fakes photographs to sell to the Daily Bugle. I suppose you could say that’s goofy, but I think it is a nice touch of realism, demonstrating how Peter Parker is not some perfect character – he’s willing to bend the rules a bit. So I don’t count them as goofy plot points, but I can see how others might disagree, so I figured I’d pay lip service to those staged photos here.

Alien Plot

In addition, the aliens in the Tinkerer story in #2. Fairly goofy, but as I mentioned in the Fantastic Four list, aliens invading Earth was just such a standard comic cliche that to term this specific use “goofy” would be, I believe, unfair. And outside of their actual existence, that story wasn’t particularly goofy.

10. Industrial Light and Magic

In a back-up in Amazing Spider-Man #8, Spider-Man goes to bust the Human Torch’s chops. Johnny Storm is busy hanging out with some ladies. One lady decides to do a nice, interpretative dance (all the rage back then at teenage get-togethers). At this point, Johnny pulls out a power I’ve never seen before or since, with good reason!

amazing spiderman 08 - 19_edited.jpg

And the Actor’s Union thing makes even LESS sense, as what would they care?

9. “Of all the gym joints in all the schools in all the world, they walk into mine….”

So, in Amazing Spider-Man #8, Peter Parker knocks Flash Thompson out while boxing, and Flash wakes up in the gym locker room (where Peter carried him to). As he goes to tie his shoelaces, though, he picks the same point in time that some crooks who were trying to steal a robot come flying in, and the result is goofy Stooge-esque history!

amazing spiderman 08 - 16_edited.jpg

8. Interesting Science Experiment

So how did Peter and Flash get INTO the ring?

Well, they share a science class together.

See, this panel even tells us this.

amazing spiderman 08 - 02_edited.jpg

They have some back and forth, leading to their SCIENCE teacher to decide that, OF COURSE, the two of them should box each other!

amazing spiderman 08 - 05_edited.jpg

amazing spiderman 08 - 5_edited.jpg

Pretty goofy stuff!

I never had a science teacher like that!!

7. How Conveeeeeeeeeeeeeeeenient

In Amazing Spider-Man #4, the Sandman is on the run from the coppers, so hides out in the local high school. Meanwhile, Peter Parker is helping out at the school, and comes across the janitor working with the school’s “king-size vacuum cleaner.”

I can hear the groaning already.

amazingspiderman04-10_edited.jpg

Later, surprise, surprise, Peter saves the day by sucking up Sandman into the giant-sized vacuum.

amazingspiderman04-16_edited.jpg

Sooo goofy.

6. Giving Prisoners a Little Too Much Rights

After Spider-Man defeats the Vulture in Amazing Spider-Man #2, what do the police do?

They put him in a cell…WITH HIS COSTUME STILL ON!!!

Amazing Spider-Man - 02 14_edited.jpg

Luckily, they take it off when he enters the general populace (not that that does any good, as he manages to still escape, but at least they were TRYING later!).

5. The Best Laid Plans Of Lizards and Men Don’t Always Make Sense

Okay, so you may know the story of Dr. Curt Connors. He lost an arm, so he figured if he experimented with lizards, humans could grow back appendages like lizards can!

Well, the serum didn’t work out as he planned, instead turning him from a MAN into a LIZARD creature.

So that’s how it goes when Spider-Man meets The Lizard.

But check out the Lizard’s plans…

sm06-13_edited.jpg

How does that make ANY sense? If the serum is used on lizards, won’t it just make them more lizard-y? How would it turn them into Lizards like him? It makes no sense!!

4. Reconsideration

In Amazing Spider-Man #3, Spider-Man gets his behind handed to him by Doctor Octopus, causing him to basically quit being a superhero.

The governor then has to call in the Fantastic Four, but only Johnny is available, and he is out of sorts, because he has “exhausted his flame.”

sm03-13_edited.jpg

However, later in the issue, after Spidey took care of Doctor Octopus, we go to Johnny’s hotel room (and why is he IN a hotel? Don’t the FF LIVE in New York? The only reason THAT’S not on the list is because I guess I can see Stan thinking Johnny wouldn’t be allowed to stay in the headquarters all by himself) and learn that he had a VIRUS!!

sm03-21_edited.jpg

Seems like Stan figured that the first explanation wasn’t all that good, all things considered.

3. Reach Out and Touch Someone

You all know the Chameleon.

He’s a dirty Commie who uses disguises.

But did you know he apparently is a genius inventor, as well?

Well, check it out, as the Chameleon is apparently smart enough to build a device that can deliver messages only to people with spider-senses!

spiderman 01 - 20_edited.jpg

So goofy, yet so true.

2. I’ve Heard of Being Prepared, But This Is Ridiculous

So Doctor Doom was hanging out, trying to figure out his next move when, in a stroke of luck, he happened to catch Spider-Man on a TV show in Amazing Spider-Man #5.

sm05-02_edited.jpg

But what was even MORE lucky was that Doom just HAPPENED to have handy a machine with a giant spider that allowed him to talk to people with spider-senses!!!

Yes, the SECOND time in five issues this exact routine was used!

And it involves Doom talking into a big microphone that zaps into the giant spider!!!

sm05-03_edited.jpg

Goofy?

You betcha!

1. Ohhhh….an anti-magnetic inverter! OF COURSE!!!

The goofiest plot point, though, in the first ten issues of Amazing Spider-Man, has to be Peter Parker’s first experience with the high-flying Vulture.

The Vulture is pretty impressive, but Peter thinks he can work up a device that will help. It takes him all night, but he finishes it.

Amazing Spider-Man - 002 07_edited.jpg

Later, in battle, Peter springs his device – and it WORKS!

Amazing Spider-Man - 002 12_edited.jpg

Down goes the Vulture! Down goes the Vulture! Down goes the Vulture! I don’t believe what I just saw!

So what is this magical device?

Well, Peter figured the Vulture was using magnets to fly (I swear, Stan Lee seemed to think that magnets and/or transistors could do literally anything), so he invented….sigh… just see for yourself…

Amazing Spider-Man - 002 14_edited.jpg

Yep, of COURSE, an anti-magnetic inverter!!! It reminds me of when Jack B. Quick came up with the idea of how to save the world – build a Doomsday device, then switch it into reverse!!

Makes as much sense as this!

Luckily, Stan brought the Vulture back in a few issues, and made sure to quickly invalidate the silly anti-magnetic inverter option, forcing Spidey to beat him fair and square.

Anyhow, that’s the top ten! Feel free to quibble, or to offer your choices!

54 Comments

8. Hey, isn’t that Miles Warren ? The Jackal ? The guy who first cloned Gwen Stacy ?

Definitely not somebody you want as a science teacher…

After checking, this is actually another Mr Warren.

moose n squirrel

October 30, 2006 at 6:35 am

The Doom thing I’ll accept. Dr. Doom can invent anything.

I would argue that inventing web fluid is the goofiest thing ever. I mean, a dude being bit by a radioactive spider, and receiving powers comprable to the spider, that I can buy. But a fifteen year old inventing a super adhesive? Sheesh! Where is the realism in that? Comics are supposed to be for adults and will always be for adults! I can’t believe how hokey they make these stories! Dammit! Take me Seriously!!

God, I can really hate Marvel sometimes.

What about Spidey’s “web-bats,” from the same issue as Johnny Storm’s infra-red spotlight? I may be mis-remembering, but I recall a jilted-feeling Spidey/Peter watching that party from outside, then deciding to “impress” the girls and one-up Johnny by sending in a group of faux-bats created with web fluid.

If I’m not mis-remembering, I’d say the “web-bats to impress girls” is a much goofier plot point than Johnny’s infra-red spotlight. But, that’s just me.

I mean, web-bats!

According to Kurt Busiek’s Untold Tales of Spider-Man, Peter’s high school science teacher is Miles Warren’s brother, if I recall correctly. At least, that’s where I read it; someone else may have made the connection first.

These are good (the random Torch power was done by Kirby though, not Ditko. Kirby had a tendency to pull out random powers all the time, like when Johnny Storm transported the FF home in a giant heat vortex in an early issue.) I still recommend you do John Broome Silver Age issues, those are among the goofiest comics ever, much more goofy then anything Marvel did.

My favorite bit was how nonscientists in a Broome comic invented amazing mind-boggling things all the time, and it was treated as commonplace. Trickster is a circus acrobat who casually invents shoes that allow him to fly while tinkering with stuff around his house. While in the jail shoproom, Captain Boomerang casually invents a time-traveling boomerang. Mirror Master invents a mirror with an image of the Flash and whatever you do to the image on the mirror will happen to the Flash in real life. The best part is that after each defeat, the villain would never use the incredibly useful invention ever again. Oh, and who can forget cosmic treadmill! ;)

But here’s the thing with the anti-magnetic inverter, webshooters, etc:

Peter Parker is a scientific genius.

I don’t think this can be emphasized enough. The man, at age 16, was a master of at least 3 scientific fields. It’s just part of his character, and so not–to my mind–a “goofy” out-of-left-field plot point like, say, the Chameleon’s spider-sense-walkie-talkie or the janitor’s king-sized vacuum (which, at least, Stan had the storytelling sense to set up early in the story). If anyone can invent an anti-magnetic inverter out of household objects and a dime-store chemistry set it’s our man Parker.

I’ve always thought the goofiest plot point of Spider-Man’s early days was one of omission.

Throughout his high school days, Peter Parker is an outcast – “puny Parker,” the wimp, bookworm, coward, etc. With few exceptions, none of his classmates respects him. And *certainly* no one thinks he’s “cool” in any way, shape, or form.

But… WHY?

Think about it. Granted, nobody knows he’s Spider-Man. But they *do* know Peter’s part-time job. He’s essentially a combat photographer (and a frequently-published one) in his spare time! Seriously, how cool is that, especially in high school?

(On the flip side, you’d think Aunt May would freak out about as much from this job as from Peter being Spidey….)

Gotta say, Brian, after your FF list, this one’s a little disappointing. Most of these barely qualify as goofy! But you’re right, Spider- Man, on the whole, was a lot less goofy than the FF. It’s funny, because everyone holds Lee Kirby up as the standard, but I think Lee- Ditko is much better. I don’t think Stan and Jack ever really had much chemistry; their storytelling sensibilities are so different. But Stan and Steve, being both motivated by human charicteization, go together much better. Personally, I think that Spider- man and Dr. Strange are clearly the cream of the Silver Age Marvel crop.

And T, stop bustin’ on the old DC Schwartz stuff! Some of us happen to love that! Although, yeah, there were some goofy moments. But that’s all part of the charm….

Ken, it has its charms and I enjoyed the stories (particularly the Batman stuff Julie edited), I’m just noting that for sheer goofiness it’s even better suited for this type of list than Spider-Man and FF. I’m not dissing the stuff anymore than Bri is dissing the Spider-Man or the FF stories.

This isn’t a specific plot point so much as a general observation, but…did you ever notice the way Ditko portrayed gangsters as not ever actually, you know, doing anything?

I mean, sure, you have constant plots in which people like the Big Man, the Crime Master, and the Green Goblin fight over and take over the mobs. But there’s never any stories about any of those mobs planning and executing crimes other than efforts to attack other mobsters. You get street thugs and individual criminals robbing banks and so on, but the big mobs and gang bosses Ditko writes? They just attack superheroes and each other. That’s it.

For instance, I’ll wager that nobody here could tell me what the Crime-Master’s particular racket was, or what Lucky Lobo’s mob derived its income from, or, for that matter, any crime the Green Goblin committed during Ditko’s run other than constantly trying to beat up or kill Spider-Man. Leaving the Goblin aside for obvious reasons, how did these guys make money?

I’m sure there’s a way to read it in terms of Ditko’s politics, but the whole thing is sort of weird and goofy, to my mind at least.

Not from the first ten issues obviously, but there’s all sorts of goofyness in the first annual where the Sinister Six first formed.

1. Doc Ock kidnaps Betty Brant and Aunt May and charms the pants off the old gal. When Betty tries to convince her that Ock is evil, may says something like “Don’t judge him because of his condition”, his condition being 4 metal arms.

2. Ock throws on a bathing suit and oxygen tank to fight Spidey underwater because that’s his home turf.

3. When Peter rescues May, he says ‘I hope you’re not too shook up’ to which May scolds him for using slang

4. After the Sinister Six are arrested, the police not only keep them in the same cell, they don’t remove their costumes.

I don’t have the issue in front of me to the direct quotes, so I’m just going from memory.

As far as number 8 goes, I’ve never encountered the “settle it with your fists!” method of conflict resloution in my teacher training, but educational theory has changed a lot in the last 40 years. Also, what’s really funny about all this is these early stories are appearing in papers across the country as free inserts (they cut the issues in half, other than the origin). I’ve been following them just to see Ditko’s art on these in color for the first time (I read all of the Silver Age Spidey stuff in the Essentials, so it’s a treat, really).

Also, I have an exceptionally generous suspension of disbelief, but I remember Spidey making a web canoe in an issue where he was chasing the Lizard around Florida, and that bugging me with its goofiness. This other stuff, though, I had no problem with. So, where the hell is the web canoe, Cronin?!?!

I just figured the “I exhausted my flame” bit was a cover story for the public, and that Johnny didn’t want the general populace knowing that the FF’s (then) most powerful member could be taken out by the common cold.

I just figured the “I exhausted my flame” bit was a cover story for the public, and that Johnny didn’t want the general populace knowing that the FF’s (then) most powerful member could be taken out by the common cold.

It was the possibility of that that kept that particular one from being higher on the list.

These are good (the random Torch power was done by Kirby though, not Ditko. Kirby had a tendency to pull out random powers all the time, like when Johnny Storm transported the FF home in a giant heat vortex in an early issue.)

Yeah, upon re-reading the list, it does look like I’m implying that Ditko drew all of these. Sorry about that. I’ll go add in that Kirby drew that back-up.

The Doom thing I’ll accept. Dr. Doom can invent anything.

No doubt!

However, the goofy thing is not that Doom invented it, but rather that Doom had it laying around, even though, as we see a few panels earlier, he wasn’t even THINKING about Spider-Man when he invented it!

He just thought, “Hey, I could use this giant spider I caught for some reason to contact Spider-Man!”

I would argue that inventing web fluid is the goofiest thing ever.

Not a bad choice, except it wasn’t in the first ten issue of Amazing Spider-Man, it took place in Amazing Fantasy.

If I’m not mis-remembering, I’d say the “web-bats to impress girls” is a much goofier plot point than Johnny’s infra-red spotlight. But, that’s just me.

I mean, web-bats!

I liked that, if only because it showed how little Peter knew about girls.

But here’s the thing with the anti-magnetic inverter, webshooters, etc:

Peter Parker is a scientific genius.

I don’t think this can be emphasized enough. The man, at age 16, was a master of at least 3 scientific fields. It’s just part of his character, and so not–to my mind–a “goofy” out-of-left-field plot point like, say, the Chameleon’s spider-sense-walkie-talkie or the janitor’s king-sized vacuum (which, at least, Stan had the storytelling sense to set up early in the story). If anyone can invent an anti-magnetic inverter out of household objects and a dime-store chemistry set it’s our man Parker.

But it paled in comparison to the other times Peter used science. For instance, when he bonded Doc Ock’s arms together. THAT was fine, but here, I think even Lee knew that the idea was overly goofy, because, as I mentioned, he quickly brought the Vulture back (the FIRST villain to make a return in the title!) and dismissed the anti-magnetic inverter.

The goofiness comes from the deus ex machina aspect of it all.

Like fighting Elektro, and breaking out an “Anti-Electric Inverter” which takes away Elektro’s powers.

This isn’t a specific plot point so much as a general observation, but…did you ever notice the way Ditko portrayed gangsters as not ever actually, you know, doing anything?

Good point.

Ditko also made sure to make bad guys always identifiable, as they all wore tweed hats or had thin mustaches.

Ah, good point. Web fluid was before Amazing.

Also, I was being way sarcastic. And I suppose I’m a moron for not knowing that you all knew I was sarcastic. Regardless, web fluid rules.

// and why is he IN a hotel? Don’t the FF LIVE in New York? The only reason THAT’S not on the list is because I guess I can see Stan thinking Johnny wouldn’t be allowed to stay in the headquarters all by himself //

To be fair to Stan I don’t think it was yet established that Peter lived in Queens. (Someone could correct me if I’m wrong but I’m pretty sure the specific NY references didn’t start for another issue or two). Stan and Steve were all over the map in the early days, in the first story Peter tries out for the Ed Sullivan show, (putting him in the NYC area), and in the very next story he’s viewing a space flight launch, (which would put him in Florida).

// Well, Peter figured the Vulture was using magnets to fly (I swear, Stan Lee seemed to think that magnets and/or transistors could do literally anything), //

Believe it or not in the late 50’s early 60’s there was a train of thought that Magnetic propolsion would be the next big thing, some magizine did an artical on it, and how it would one day be how we travel in space and after that there were a few years there were science fiction and comics were full of magnetically propelled things. Chester Gould of Dick Tracy was even worst then Stan, he not only introduced a magnetically controlled space ship, but he started having his characters fly around in garbage can shaped cars that were magnetically propelled. He even had characters regularly say things like “the country that controlled magnetism will control the world”.

Web goddamn canoe!

Or maybe it was web golashes that I thought were really dumb, now that I think of it. I’m going to have to find my copy of Essential Spidey 1. Or just wait for those issues to reprinted in the paper.

In one of the very first issues of Amazing Spider-Man, they established that, when hardened (which it would be when exposed to air), the webs could form many different rudimentary solid shapes, so I don’t mind a web canoe.

To be fair to Stan I don’t think it was yet established that Peter lived in Queens. (Someone could correct me if I’m wrong but I’m pretty sure the specific NY references didn’t start for another issue or two). Stan and Steve were all over the map in the early days, in the first story Peter tries out for the Ed Sullivan show, (putting him in the NYC area), and in the very next story he’s viewing a space flight launch, (which would put him in Florida).

Queens might not have been mentioned in Amazing Fantasy #15 or Amazing Spider-Man #1 (I don’t know offhand), but I know it was mentioned a number of times before the issue in question.

Goofiest in the first 10 issue (and the rest of the series)? The explanation why spider-webbing is useless… Thats goofy. I vaguely remember (from reprints) that spider-webbing was dismissed out of hand as a money making scheme for Peter Parker in one of the earlier issues (was it in the first 10 to qualify here).

Why isn’t Peter Parker rich from the patent of spider-webbing? A strong as steel substance that can be molded and extruded as required. And cheap to manufacture too if Peter Parker can synthesize it in his garage. Even if temporary (lasting only a few hours), I can think of significant uses of it in construction work.

If the temporary nature of spider-webbing poses a problem in practical applications, one could still get stinking rich patenting the formula for use as a way-point for further research by bigger companies – the hard works been done. I bet you – a major chemicals company would pay millions to get a basic patent like this. It may be flawed in the initial state but think what it can be several years down the line with further R&D (which Peter Parker has neglected to do in improving his formula).

Which makes me think, Bio web-shooters make more sense for Spider-man (blasphemy!).

Hmmm….I honestly don’t recall WHEN the webbing was turned down as not being worth investing in. I’m pretty sure it wasn’t in the first ten, though (unless it’s in Amazing Fantasy, which I’m not counting here, but I don’t recall it being there, either).

You missed one of my favorites. In #6, Dr. Curt Connors grows back his missing right arm by synthesizing a formula from lizard enzymes. So far, so good.

Later, after Connors mutates into The Lizard, he writes a good-bye note to his family. Right-handed.

I’m pretty sure Peter’s web fluid is turned down in issue #18…by SCIENCE!!!

If memory serves, during that story Peter isd tryign to avoid fights as Spidey and get cash for Aunt May’s medical expenses, he also goes to a trading card company to license his image, anticipating the existence of superhero trading cards by some decades. He’s turned down there because everyone still thinks he’s a coward for fleeing the Green Goblin in the prior issue.

Don’t you think that the reason the gangsters never DO anything is because of the Comics Code?

Number 4 — the Human Torch had a fever, so his powers wouldn’t work? What? A guy that turns into living flame had a *fever*… that broke his *power*???

Restated, here’s a guy whose main power is to get REALLY hot. I would think it would be kinda easy to “burn off” any virus that ever happened to infect him!

“Don’t you think that the reason the gangsters never DO anything is because of the Comics Code?”

No, because they showed other criminals committing….

Oh. Wait. I — I see what you did there. Well played, yo go re, well played.

“Restated, here’s a guy whose main power is to get REALLY hot. I would think it would be kinda easy to “burn off” any virus that ever happened to infect him!”

Viruses work by invading the cells oft he body and modifying their RNA so as to turn said cells into little virus factories. If Johnny’s cells are flame-proof, the viral RNA is a part of those cells and so survives.

Bacteria would be screwed though. Incidentally, this probably means that Johnny never needs to brush his teeth to avoid bad breath and gingivitis.

I really like this blog, but I must admit this particular entry makes me want to know why you hate the fun.

But this is all ABOUT the fun!!!

I even made a point of saying “This is not meant to be malicious”!!

It’s all in good fun!!

Regarding #8

Bob Greene, the well known columnist, published a book called “Be True To Your School” which was his basically a journal he kept that detailed every day of his life in 1964 (he kept it as a writing exercise). I remember he wrote about two students who got into an altercation and the teachers took them into the gym and made them box each other to “settle” it. So it doesn’t seem to be to out of context for the times.

It should be then, goofiest ideas of teachers in the 60s! :)

But yes, excellent point, Rob.

And, I mean, fun’s fun and all. But it’s worth pointing out that both Fantastic Four and Spider-man got much, much better by issue 30.

I know I’m very late for this, but I wasn’t reading Comics Should Be Good back then.

I can’t believe you left out Spidey’s rescue of John Jameson from #1. A Mercury-type space capsule, already seperated from the booster rocket, was orbiting at an altitude low enough for a small airplane to reach, and moving slowly enough for the plane to get close. If you know anything at all about how spaceships and orbits work, this is so incredibly ridiculous it’s almost impossible to keep reading.

Rex Patambang

May 1, 2011 at 11:16 pm

You were right, Spidey was written better than FF back in the day. Will you be doing X-Men anytime soon?

Omar’s right about Amazing #18 being where Pete tries to sell the secret of his webbing, but is turned down by the Peerless Paste Company because it dissolves in an hour – and so they consider it useless.

Although (especially considering the the real world analogy that the adhesive used on Post-it notes was first deemed a failure because it was too weak to hold anything securely) this is not so much goofy as it is poor foresight by the paste people (and poor presentation by Peter in presenting it as a traditional adhesive when it is something completely new and he had already developed a number of unique uses for it).

JC LEBOURDAIS

May 5, 2011 at 8:08 am

The reason why Johnny Storm stays in a hotel is that at the time he lives with his sister somewhere in the suburbs. Remember this was before Reed and Sue’s wedding.
JC

I always giggled at the ending of the Lizard story, where Connors says to his wife “If not for Spiderman, I might never have held you in my arms again.” Err, arms? He’s only got one, remember?

It would never be allowed now, but when I was in middle school I had a teacher get fed up with the constant carping between me and my ‘Sworn Enemy’ so he had us duke it out once and for all. We beat the hell out of each other, then he gave us both detention, and within a week we became friends who still hang out to this day. We often look back and laugh about our cartoonish feud.

It breaks my heart to think about all of the friendships that could have been but for ‘civility’ and ‘political correctness’. (sniff)

Re: the actors’ union thing. I think they will all WANT Johnny Storm to assist them in their interpretive dances and avant-garde acting techniques. Once she sees his groovy skills, she’s like, “Wait till the other actors hear about this! They’ll all want your dazzling infra-red spot light!” (You see: actors love the spotlight, dig?).

Encyclopedia Brown

May 12, 2011 at 8:14 am

Regarding Vulture being incarcerated in his costume–this kind of thing still happens. In the first arc of New Avengers v1, half the supervillains in The Raft are wearing their masks.

Regarding Vulture being incarcerated in his costume–this kind of thing still happens. In the first arc of New Avengers v1, half the supervillains in The Raft are wearing their masks.

Strange, I never noticed that. Kind of funny. Also funny is what’s the point of wearing them at that point? As disguise?

Actually Number 2’s “Spider Wave Transmitter” sounds like a great name for a band.

I love “techy” Spider-Man. I always thought it would have been interesting if Peter was just a nerd wanting to be a super-hero and all the his powers would be artificial from stuff he would have created.

LEADER DESSLOK

March 24, 2013 at 8:35 am

I don’t find these moments “goofy” at all. I just think, again, it’s cynical sensibility rearing its ugly head again. Where “coincidence” as a plot device is seen as “goofy”. No wonder so many stories that are being written these days are so BORING! I now see what C.C.Beck was saying in THE CRUSTY CURMUDGEON column he used to write for TCJ way-back-when.

Oh, I can’t let this slip by.

LEE\DITKO better than LEE\KIRBY?!? OH, HELL NO!

I love Steve but overall, I think in terms of Co-plotting, storytelling and art–Steve was amazing–but Jack was MAGIC!

In some ways it’s like comparing apples and oranges–but I know this– I love oranges a heckuva lot more!

Flash is right, that IS a creepy looking gizmo. Mad inventors usually try to make their insane robot abominations look pretty much human in proportions. That thing looks more like a kachina.

Forgetting that opposite magnetic poles attract I can chalk up to hasty scripting, but that “infrared spotlight” was clearly devised by someone who never grasped that infrared light is invisible to humans. No wonder that power never came up again.

I can’t get over how much Peter looks like Boomhauer before the Human Torch assembly, but all is forgiven after reading that “Relax Torch” punchline. LOL, that kills me.

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