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CSBG Archive

Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #104

This is the one-hundredth and fourth in a series of examinations of comic book urban legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous one-hundred and three. Click here for a similar archive, only arranged by subject.

Let’s begin!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: DC Comics almost bought Diamond Comics Distrubutors.

STATUS: Basically True

It’s hard to believe that less than thirteen years ago, comic retailers actually had a choice of who they could get their comics distributed by, but that was the case back in the early 90s, where the three biggest distributors were Diamond, Capitol City and Heroes World.

174-marvel_logo.jpg

Marvel caused quite a scene in December of 1994 when they purchased Heroes World.

Everyone waited for the other shoe to drop, and drop it did in early March 1995, when Marvel announced that its comics would be distributed exclusively through Heroes World.

As you can imagine, this caused quite a hysteria – beyond the fact that Heroes World was not really prepared to handle ALL of Marvel’s comics (which led to many problems in the early goings), and beyond the fact that Marvel irked quite a few retailers when they began inserting in their comics catalogs for readers to purchase their Marvel products directly from Heroes World, causing a momentary panic among retailers that Marvel would be starting their own retail outlet chain (looking back, the comic book bubble bursting probably helped avoid that actually occurring).

Beyond that, the move caused a shockwave throughout the distribution system. The largest-selling comic company was now unavailable to be distributed by the remaining companies, which was a big drain on their finances.

180px-DC_Bullet_Deluxe.jpg

Meanwhile, though, the remaining big comic companies feared being shut out of the comic distribution game, and Diamond and Capitol City, the top two remaining companies, hustled to get the other companies to sign exclusivity deals with them, resulting in the announcement in late April (less than two months after Marvel’s announcement) that DC Comics, Image Comics and Dark Horse Comics would be distributed exclusively by Diamond Comic Distributors. Capitol City ended up signing Kitchen Sink and TSR to exclusive deals.

200px-Diamondcomics.png

A year later, crippled by this arrangement, Capitol City sold off to Diamond Comics.

Ultimately, the Heroes World arrangement did not work out, and Marvel signed an exclusive deal with Diamond as well, leaving it as the ONLY major direct market distributor of the “Big Four” comic book companies.

However, reader yo go re asks:

I remember hearing at the time that DC was going to be buying Diamond (or had an option to do so in the future), just as Marvel had bought Heroes World. Obviously that never came to pass, but was there ever real discussion of DC buying Diamond, or was that just a rumor based on conflation of real events and supposition?

“Marvel bought HW. Marvel is now exclusive through HW. DC is now exclusive through Diamond. DC bought Diamond.”

yo go re is spot on, at least with his reference to “the option to buy,” as that is exactly what DC did.

DC did not really WANT to purchase Diamond Comics, as they knew from Marvel’s problems that it was not exactly all that cost-efficient TO distribute their own books. They were fine with Diamond doing it. However, they were also afraid that some OTHER company would purchase Diamond, so what DC ended up agreeing with Diamond head Steve Geppi was that DC would have the option of first refusal. If anyone tried to buy Diamond, they would automatically offer it to DC Comics first, thereby protecting DC in case someone, like Image Comics, tried to purchase DIamond.

Now, over a decade later, it’s hard to believe there was ever anything BUT Diamond, eh?

Thanks to yo go re for the suggestion.

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: A character who was appropriate enough for a DC cartoon was found not appropriate for a DC toy.

STATUS: True

I am sure most of us remember the buzz that surrounded the character of Lobo during the early 90s.

The ultra violent, dark humored alien bounty hunter was one of DC’s most popular comic titles, even as they hesitated to give the character his own title.

14694_4_001.jpg

No one was more surprised than creator Keith Giffen, who looked at the character as a SATIRE of the very type of character Lobo grew to become.

Lobo was ultimately popular enough that he made his debut in the DC Superhero CARTOON universe, as well, appearing first in the Superman Animated Series.

Lobo.gif

Lobo then appeared in a Season 2 episode of the Justice League cartoon.

However, while pretty much EVERY character who showed up on the cartoon ended up with their own toy, Lobo was not, even though there was a rumor that DC actually had made a mold of him, before determining not to produce him. The rumor was that the character was determined to be a bit too “mature” for a toy.

I checked with Cheryl Rubin, DC Comics’ Senior Vice President in charge of Brand Management, and she confirmed it. According to Rubin:

Because the JLU animated series and products are primarily for kids, even though we know and appreciate how much our older fans enjoy both, we thought it best not to include a character as violent as Lobo in the JLU line.

Pretty interesting, eh? The character was okay for a cartoon show, but not for a toy tie-in TO the cartoon show.

Perhaps Wal-Mart had something to do with it? They presumably would not want violent toys, and DC and Mattel most likely would not want to challenge them anyways. It’s not like a Lobo toy is a gigantic deal for them or anything like that. That being said, it also is very believable that DC and Mattel just decided Lobo was too violent on their own.

Still, it’s an interesting situation – okay for a cartoon show, but not okay for a tie-in TO the cartoon show.

Weird…but true.

Thanks to Cheryl Rubin and Alex Segura for the information!!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: There was purple Kryptonite.

STATUS: False

Reader Rich mentioned that he read about a purple krpytonite on a few different websites (including this one) that described purple Kryptonite as giving humans the same powers as Kryptonians. Rich had never heard of such a thing, and asked me to look into it, and luckily for me, that’s exactly what Michael Eury did in his great tome, The Krypton Companion!

They have a whole section on people mistakingly believing that there was a purple kryptonite.

116_4_159.jpg

The first appearance (which is the one Rich came across) was Superman #159, which perfectly demonstrates where the confusion lies. In the issue, which is an Imaginary Tale, Lois Lane becoming Supermaid on the planet Krypton after being exposed to a purple element called “earthite,” which, naturally enough, sounds like the opposite of Kryptonite, right?

The next occurance was almost twenty years later, in Superman #371, where a purple SUN causes Superman to develop special mental powers.

116_4_371.jpg

All this, but no purple Kryptonite! Thanks to Michael Eury for the info, and Rich for asking the question!

Okay, that’s it for this week!

Feel free to drop off any urban legends you’d like to see featured!

52 Comments

In the issue, which is an Imaginary Tale

As opposed to all the other Superman issues, which are based on true events.

There SHOULD be purple kryptonite.

I am pretty sure that Styx was bigger than Heroes World before Marvel purchased it.

I could be wrong.

Styx went the way of the other distributors once they couldn’t have Marvel or DC Comics anymore. (I think there are still Styx stores, though.)

Glenn Simpson

May 25, 2007 at 6:32 am

“Imaginary Tale” is a formal term denoting a specific thing.

The “aren’t they all?” observation was clever the first 100 times somebody made it.

To the AAP said: “As opposed to all the other Superman issues, which are based on true events. ”

Some younger readers might not know that the term “Imaginary Tale” back then was used in the same way that the term, “Elseworlds” is used today.

I think that seeing “Imaginary Tale” on a comic book today would lead just as much ridicule as a character named “Supermaid.”

Theno

What kid wouldn’t want to play with “The Main Man?”

Seriously, I’ve never been much for the whole, uber hip, anti-hero guys like Spawn, Venom, Punisher and Lobo (I mean, Christ, my favorite hero is the Flash. Can you get more white bread than that? Ok Captain Marvel…but you get the point), but Bruce Timm and company made Lobo so hillarious, tough, and likeable that I bet a few kiddies desperatly wanted a Lobo figure to go with their “Submarine Action Batman!” and “Battle Damaged Hawkgirl!”

A “purple sun?”

Astrophysics does not work that way!

The “momentary panic among retailers that Marvel would be starting their own retail outlet chain” notion sounds like its own Urban Legend.

Is there any evidence that Marvel ever seriously considered doing this?

Some younger readers might not know that the term “Imaginary Tale” back then was used in the same way that the term, “Elseworlds” is used today.

Exactly, though I gathered that much from the cover I still thought it was quite a silly term in this context.

I’m very sorry if my lack of knowledge of humorously intended remarks made within the blogosphere about certain decades old DC comics caused Glenn Simpson, supreme overlord of nerd-jokes, any offense.

Uhm, J…on the off chance that you don’t know, the “This is an Imaginary Story. Aren’t they all.” line is from an extremely well-regarded Alan Moore Superman story, a story that was at the time presented as the “last” Silver Age Superman tale.

As such, the quote (from Moore’s frontspiece to the story) became a sort of slogan for a certain segment of the superhero comics audience in the late 1990s. It’s less an overplayed nerd joke than a once-charming observation transformed by overuse into…well, into an annoying comics nerd tic.

Completely O/T, but I do love the typically Silver Age exposition on that cover. “Don’t be jealous, Kal-El! Just because Supermaid [snicker] has the fabulous powers, glory and adoration of millions you *could’ve* had…”

…apparently dickery runs in the family.

Hmm. So as a follow up – We got any concrete proof that Marvel was thinking of going into comics Retail after the Heroes World thing?

SanctumSanctorumComix

May 25, 2007 at 9:21 am

Yeah.

I have some “proof”.
Of a sort.

I actually BOUGHT a bunch of stuff from Marvel’s phone&mail order retail offshoot (entire comic runs and crossover “events” from the MIDNIGHT SONS line).

They offered a bunch of stuff mostly (then-recent) comics and shirts and stuff, but it seemed readily apparent that if it took hold, they could expand the concept.

Remember, Heroes World had their own retail stores.
(I discovered one of them on Long Island, New York when I was a wee lad in the 1970’s and was blown away by all the swag. That store was still in the same mall, but different booth location, 20 years later)

It would have been easy enough for Marvel to have just kept the shoppes open and slowly add more locations as they saw fit.

I think Marvel might have been able to have the option for buying the stock as well.

Of course, I’m not 100% SURE about this.

I DID buy one of the Heroes World store’s display cases (which had actually been purchased by another shoppe around that time), so they might not have optioned for the stock. Just the name and distribution resources.

But, it became a moot point, because as soon as Marvel started soliciting it’s own back-stock directly to the fans, every retailer that I had contact with (and I worked at one at the time) was
f-r-e-a-k-i-n-g
o-u-t.

They saw it as a sign that Marvel didn’t care about them, and that even if Marvel didn’t open it’s own stores, but just kept the exclusive distribution deal, that the extra costs for shipping and higher costs for their orders (lower bulk discounts would apply to both Diamond and Heroes World, because their orders were basically being “split” between them) would make it harder to make any profit.

Marvel’s ineptitude (and other circumstances) screeched that scenario to a halt.

Sadly, we were then left with a monopolistic giant.

A lose/lose, really.

~P~
P-TOR

I can’t give you proff that Marvel was trying to go into retail, but I can guarantee you that the FEELING that they were going to go into retail was there.

I was in distribution at the time, and my customers were quite concerned.

I hate myself for being so anal as to point this out, but Lobo actually appeared in the Justice League episode “Hereafter”, which aired about mid-season, not in the season premiere “Twilight”.

Speaking of Justice League, has the rumor about why Blue Beetle couldn’t appear on the show been covered? Something about the rights to the character being tied up as far back as the 1940s because of an old radio show or something. It’d be nice to get the whole story on that.

Have a good day.
John Cage

Dan (other Dan)

May 25, 2007 at 10:56 am

Who is that on the cover of Superman 371? Blanka from Street Fighter II totally ripped that guy off. Does he roll into a ball and bite people?

Still, it’s an interesting situation – okay for a cartoon show, but not okay for a tie-in TO the cartoon show.

Well, not for a toy tie-in, at least. Back in 2000, Lobo had his own online cartoon series, as a companion to the better-remembered “Gotham Girls” online cartoon.

There was also a pitch for a regular Lobo cartoon, which didn’t make it past the pitch stage.

And I’m skeptical of the Wal-Mart claim. According to Boy Wonder over at AFI, it’s simply DC and Warner’s doing. Wal-Mart didn’t even sell the JL figures for a couple of years. Besides, even if a Lobo were produced today, he’d either have to be a Con exclusive (like Grundy) or a Target 6-pack exclusive (like Doomsday), and would thus never see a Wal-Mart shelf.

Lobo never worked for me while he was a part of mainstream DCU.

[quote]Who is that on the cover of Superman 371? Blanka from Street Fighter II totally ripped that guy off. Does he roll into a ball and bite people?[/quote]

HAHAHAHAHAH!

Of course the rest of the tales are not imaginary!

Matthew Turnage

May 25, 2007 at 12:54 pm

After Marvel began distributing their own books, they also started requiring a minimum purchase of 3 copies of any books ordered. I remember my local small town comic shop owner telling me that he had one customer that read Daredevil, and in order to keep that customer happy he had to eat two copies of Daredevil every month. They got out of the business about a year later. There was a lot of damage to the industry in the mid-90’s but I think Marvel buying Heroes World was one of the major blows.

I always liked the whole rainbow of Kryptonites, but only in old Silver Age stories. Bringing them all back into the current Superman mythos, as they’ve now done, seems kind of lame. Not as lame, however, as Superman’s ever-changing origin story and the even lame reasons for it… “Space-time continuum changed because Superboy-Prime punched his way into it”, indeed! PSHAW!

What Omar is trying to say, J, is:

Congratulations, you’ve become the comics nerd you profess to hate without even trying.

Omar, I honestly didn’t know, so the chance wasn’t that far off I guess.

I grew up on Spidey and X-Man in the early 90s, Invasion Of The Spiderslayers was the first arc I read completely and even though I’ve caught up on lots of stuff there’s still lots of stuff I wasn’t aware of. I was a full-on Marvelite back then and DC or Superman didn’t mean anything to me (Alan who? would’ve been my response back then), besides an occasional crossover.

Anyway, it was a very easy joke, I’ll admit it. The fallout’s a bit overdone I think. By the way, is that Alan Moore Supes story available in a trade?

J.

It is available. It’s called Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?

http://www.dccomics.com/graphic_novels/?gn=1584

Wonderful, wonderful story.

Does Pink Kryptonite make Superman become attracted to men? I site this panel – http://www.superdickery.com/seduction/102.html

Thanks in advance!

FYI- J

It’s also in “The DC Stories of Alan Moore” trade, or something along those lines.

Little pricier, but easier to find, and well worth it.

On the Lobo toy:

The answer we got seems to be focused on the Justice League cartoon. But I remember hearing that Lobo was supposed to get an action figure years before that, from his original appearance on the Superman Adventures cartoon. It would have been a Warner Brothers Studio Store exclusive, because it wasn’t suitable for mass market even back then.

Loren: never underestimate the power of Wal*Mart. Just because they might not have been directly involved in the decision to axe the figure, it’s almost certain that Mattel took the retail giant’s notoriously picky standards into consideration when deciding whether or not to move ahead…

Joe Gualtieri

May 25, 2007 at 9:48 pm

Adam, the current version of the DCU Stories of Alan Moore trade is NOT worth it, since it leaves out the text prelude to Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow.

Rohan Williams

May 25, 2007 at 10:10 pm

Yeah, there’s that, and then there’s how overrated the story is in the first place. I know, I know, I’m a heretic.

Loren: never underestimate the power of Wal*Mart. Just because they might not have been directly involved in the decision to axe the figure, it’s almost certain that Mattel took the retail giant’s notoriously picky standards into consideration when deciding whether or not to move ahead…

I remain skeptical. For one thing, the Lobo series ended back in 1999, three years before Lobo showed up on JL. I doubt Wal-Mart was overly concerned about kids digging through back-issue boxes.

Sure, “Lobo Unbound” started up about the same time, but by that time there wasn’t really an opportunity to market a Lobo figure, because about that time the line switched from JL to JLU. And although the JL line could accomodate an oversized figure (Darkseid, Ultra-Humanite), the JLU line couldn’t. That’s why it took a few years to get a Grundy and Doomsday, and why they had to be released in unique ways.

Plus, Wal-Mart didn’t carry the JLU line *period* for the first year or two. If you wanted JLU action figures, you had to go to Target or Toys R Us. Even now I think they just stock the singles, and not the 3-packs.

There are plans for future Target exclusives (Grodd!), which could accomodate Lobo. But Mattel has asked DC for permission to do Lobo in the past, and DC has repeatedly said no. Not even as a Convention exclusive. And I can’t believe that Wal-Mart somehow intimidated DC into not selling a Lobo toy ANYWHERE.

again,

Just because they might not have been directly involved in the decision to axe the figure, it’s almost certain that Mattel took the retail giant’s notoriously picky standards into consideration

Plus, Lobo wouldn’t be any bulkier than Ultra-Humanite or Darkseid – both figures that were released solo. And it doesn’t matter whether or not WM was carrying the figures – it’s not like Mattel wouldn’t want them to…

It always amuses me to see people talking about comics online and then get offended for being called “comics nerds.” Sure, I wish there were a better term, but the fact is that liking comics doesn’t make you a loser, and people who use the term as an insult are being pathetic themselves.

The term “imaginary stories” was used to indicate that they were not officially in continuity. Sounded better. Oh, and that Alan Moore story? Overrated indeed. As a Silver Age Superman fan I never appreciated the suggestion that his saga would end with nearly all his friends and foes brutally killed. Ironically, Moore himself seems to have realized that, judging from some comments he has made regarding his influence on comics (and his work on SUPREME, which was a total SA Supes rip-off.)

As for Lobo, DC seems to have a “let’s not draw kids to our mature titles” attitude in recent years, expressedly stated by them to justify the lack of DC/Vertigo crossovers these days.

I knew someone would get to that Blanka comment before me.

Plus, Lobo wouldn’t be any bulkier than Ultra-Humanite or Darkseid – both figures that were released solo.

Both of which were released, as I said, under the JL line. And the JL line was ended shortly after Ultra-Humanite. When it was relaunched as JLU, there were NO bulkier figures, because they couldn’t fit in the newly-designed singles or the 3-packs. And there still aren’t any being sold solo in stores. Thus resulting in guys like Grundy and Grodd, who were major recurring characters on the show and more deserving of toys than Lobo, not getting made as action figures until years later.

We know Mattel has asked for permission to do Lobo, and DC has said no. We have DC on record saying they refuse to permit a Lobo figure. We have a marketing structure that has made it impossible for Wal-Mart to have carried ANY bulky JLU figures since the line began in 2004. So we know Mattel would like to make Lobo, and that if it did happen, he’d never see a Wal-Mart shelf. Meanwhile, in terms of evidence supporting Wal-Mart as a culprit, we’ve got nothing more than speculation.

I never said they were the direct culprit – in fact, I said the exact opposite. That WM’s power is so great, they impact toys they’re not even carrying, because everyone (in every industry) has to tiptoe around them.

And Grundy, Grodd and Doomsday are twice the size of the previous “big” figures – the only thing keeping guys of Darkseid’s size from fitting on a card is the depth of the blister, and that’s easily changed…

Does Pink Kryptonite make Superman become attracted to men? I site this panel – http://www.superdickery.com/seduction/102.html

That panel is from the “Many Happy Returns” storyline at the end of Peter David’s run on Supergirl. It came out in 2002-2003, and there was a sequence that looked at the Silver Age Superman & Supergirl stories from a more modern perspective. It was an interesting mix of satire and nostalgia. The pink Kryptonite is a one-panel joke in the montage section.

i would like to see a pink kryptonite story though… maybe a worlds finest story :p

and in true silver age fashion nobody would mention the words “gay” or “homosexual” it would all be “gee whilikers, superman is acting like a real sissy since the accident with pink kryptonite!”

Well thank god we don’t have to worry about anything fun like pink kryptonite with Dan DiDio in charge! If it did appear Superman would probably just end up on the wrong end of a gay bashing. Thanks Dan!

You may want to slightly re-write the distribution bit.

My understanding is after Marvel went exclusive with Heroes World, DC went to Diamond and Capitol and told them they were going to sign exclusively with one or the other. It was up to them to come up with the better deal. Capitol owner Milton Griepp (who now runs the ICV2.com site) tried to talk DC out of doing this but did come up with a deal, but DC picked Diamond instead.

Again, check all this stuff as I’m going on memory I’m pretty certain The Comics Journal covered this and I did an interview with Griepp about some of it too.

After DC made it’s decision, other large publishers decided to put their eggs in DC’s basket and go exclusive with Diamond.

Michael posted:
A “purple sun?”

Astrophysics does not work that way!

Well, no one ever said that the Silver Age writers cared much about astrophysics (or any other real science, for that matter).
I vaguely recall an old Superboy & Legion story in which they uncover some evidence of Kryptonians arriving on Earth in the distant past. I don’t recall the story’s title, but it had something to do with a war between those Kryptonians and the ancient Atlanteans. There were a lot of the standard Silver Age absurdities we’ve grown to know and come to love. BUT, the most absurd point was that these Kryptonians did not gain superpowers (Superboy also lost his powers) because of the RED sun that Earth revolved around. Now, had this story been set in the far future (some 4 BILLION years or so), Earth will be under a red sun (assuming it’s not engulfed as the sun expands in its red phase), but this story was set millions of years in the past so Superboy (and the other Kryptonians) should have been, well, SUPER-powerful.

FYI- J

It’s also in “The DC Stories of Alan Moore” trade, or something along those lines.

Little pricier, but easier to find, and well worth it.

Thanks, I’ll give it a look!

SanctumSanctorumComix

May 31, 2007 at 8:02 pm

I have… well.. not so much an URBAN LEGEND, but a “did he or didn’t he?” query.

You seem to be able to get direct answers from J.M. DeMatteis and he is the one that this centers around.

In his handling of the MAN-THING (vol 3) series, J.M.D. had MAN-THING and his estranged wife, ELLEN (she who caused him to become MAN-THING in the first place) reunite and become split pieces of this heavenly power (much like JMD did with his run on DR FATE, where he has a brother/sister team need to unite as one to become FATE).

They hunt after the pieces of the shattered NEXUS of all REALITIES, with an entity called MR. TERMINIUS (a cosmic level entity) after them for his own purposes. TERMINIUS has taken the son of ELLEN and TED SALLIS (MAN-THING) as his emissary.

Oddly enough, when the MAN-THING series was canned before JMD could complete his story, it seems that JMD takes all this and spins it into his next gig (SPECTRE, with Hal Jordan) and reintroduces MISTER TERMINIUS as a similarly named entity; MONSIEUR STIGMONUS but who now grasps for HAL JORDAN’s niece as his liason.

Anything JMD wants to add to this?
Was his story completed?
What was to happen to MAN-THING in HIS version (as the next two issues (that were never released) promised a BOLD NEW MAN-THING.

I’ve wondered for awhile about this.

Just hopeful that you and he can shed some light.

ThanX!
~P~
P-TOR

I believe it was Frank Miller who coined the “aren’t they all?” line. As I recall, it was when asked at a panel if Dark Knight Returns was “an imaginary story”

Wow! I wonder if I can get some pink kryptonite one eBay! Rawr! ;)

Oh, that guy really looks like Blank… oh, sorry, late :)

“It always amuses me to see people talking about comics online and then get offended for being called “comics nerds.” Sure, I wish there were a better term, but the fact is that liking comics doesn’t make you a loser, and people who use the term as an insult are being pathetic themselves.”

Yeah. Cuz the people who write 12 page dissertations about how Bendis is the biggest moron who ever lived for dipicting Rocket Racer using the wrong brand of skateboard deck aren’t being nerdy at all.

The Pink K reference is now that this link

http://superdickery.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=32&Itemid=50&limitstart=100

Sorry for the sprawl…

It’s number 101, despite the number at the end of the html being 100…

It always amuses me to see people talking about comics online and then get offended for being called “comics nerds.” Sure, I wish there were a better term, but the fact is that liking comics doesn’t make you a loser, and people who use the term as an insult are being pathetic themselves.

I prefer the term geek to nerd when discussing comics fans, RPGers, anime fans, SF readers, and similar people with slightly non-mainstream interests.

Lobo is the product of comic genius but I don’t think it works as a satire. Rather than stating “violent protagonists are wrong and dumb”, it states “violence is dumb and funny”. I’m not surprised at all at the reception it got.

I always hated Lobo. Sure he was over the top, but I never realized he was supposed to be satirical.

And since they’re all imaginary stories anyway, I guess that means that we the readers get to decide which stories are “in-continuity” and which ones aren’t. I think I’ll start by excluding 1985’s Crisis on Infinite Earths as out-of-continuity!

“Keith Callbeck
I believe it was Frank Miller who coined the “aren’t they all?” line. As I recall, it was when asked at a panel if Dark Knight Returns was “an imaginary story””

Alan Moore’s use of the term predates “Dark Knight Returns” by several months.

I guess the special issue where Lobo decides to quit smoking because he thinks he has lung cancer might have been a bit too much also. (The “ominous dark spot” that appeared on his x ray turned out to be a harmonica that he swallowed earlier in the issue)

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