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CSBG Archive

365 Reasons to Love Comics #156

Welcome back to 365 Reasons to Love Comics. So cool, we’re linked to by All the Rage. Dig it.

Anthropomorphism Week continues with Duck Day 2: Duck by Dawn! Another great duck in comics is today’s, who is, surely, the richest member of the family Anatidae since the goose that laid the golden egg.
Yadda yadda, archive. Onwards!

6/5/07

156. Uncle Scrooge McDuck

Uncle Scrooge 4.jpg

Never before has a funny animal version of a Charles Dickens character been more beloved! Okay, maybe that’s a heap of faint praise, but Scrooge McDuck smashed his way into the Disney mythos in 1947 in an issue of Four Color by the brilliant Carl Barks. Scrooge is Donald Duck’s obscenely rich, miserly old Scottish uncle who takes his nephews and grand-nephews Huey, Dewey, and Louie on wacky adventures. It saddens me to say this, really, but I’m such a young’n that I didn’t even know Uncle Scrooge originated in comics and not cartoons! Well, unless you count a propaganda short called “The Spirit of ’43,” but that old dude was never named and probably isn’t official or whatever.

But, yeah. Scrooge loves money, especially coinage. In fact, he loves money so much, and he’s so stinkin’ rich, that he’s replaced almost every watery or water-based substance in his life with money. He swims in it, bathes in it, sleds on it, and even soaks his feet in it! Let’s not forget the other things he does with money: he launders it (not in the illegal way), fans himself off with it, sleeps under a blanket of it, wallpapers his home with it, turns it into a musical instrument, wears it as a lei, hang glides over it, and, er, cooks with it, for some reason. He’s even proved that money does grow on trees.

Uncle Scrooge 3.jpgUncle Scrooge 1.jpg

I’ve only got a handful of Uncle Scrooge comics myself– old smelly hand-me-down comics, but they’re great fun. Hell, they must be, as Scrooge has survived multiple publishers and numerous reprints. We’ve had Dell issues, Gold Key issues, Whitman issues, Gladstone, Gemstone… but Uncle Scrooge perseveres!

And of course, he starred in the fantastic cartoon DuckTales (woo-hoo!). You can’t beat that.

Uncle Scrooge 2.jpgUncle Scrooge 7.jpgUncle Scrooge 6.jpg

Now, everyone adored Carl Barks’ work, and, well, of course they did! Why not? Heh. There is one man who can be considered Barks’ successor, though, and that’s Don Rosa, who crafted one of the best Scrooge stories of all time, The Life and Time of Scrooge McDuck. Trust the reviews– from our main man Brian Cronin; from pop culture aficionado Tom the Dog; and from Randy Lander, the internet’s favorite comics reviewer.

Uncle Scrooge 5.jpg

Uncle Scrooge is an international star, baby! The comics are everywhere. So what the hey, if you’re not familiar with Scrooge McDuck– or even if you are– dive into the ol’ money bin and dig up some great treasure.

And click into the Wiki while you’re at it; quite informative.

24 Comments

I can’t really think of anything to say other than “Dude. Yes.”

Curse you for getting the DuckTales theme stuck in my head!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34Sb0hGUNIQ

What they said.

My favorite pick so far of this column.

Dude, Scrooge is a reason to love LIFE.

ComicBookReader

June 5, 2007 at 8:17 pm

Also, Don Rosa’s current work on Uncle Scrooge has just picked up a bevy of Harvey Award nominations.

When I was a small child, I remember reading the story of Uncle Scrooge travelling to Machu Picchu and thinking, “Why aren’t the Superman and Batman comics this good?”

Curse you for getting the DuckTales theme stuck in my head!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34Sb0hGUNIQ

And the lyrics to go along with it (from RetroJunk):

Life is like a hurricane
Here in Duckburg
Race cars, lasers, aeroplanes
It’s a duck blur
Might solve a mystery
Or rewrite history!
Ducktales! Woo Hoo!
Everyday they’re out there makin’
Ducktales! Woo Hoo!
Tales of daring, new, bad and good luck tales!
D-d-d-danger lurks behind you
There’s a stranger out to find you
What to do just grab on to some
Ducktales! Woo Hoo!
Everyday they’re out there makin’
Ducktales! Woo Hoo!
Tales of daring, new, bad and good
Ducktales! Woo Hoo!
Not pony tales or cotton tales, no
Ducktales! Woo Hoo!

Andrew Collins

June 5, 2007 at 9:07 pm

Awesome selection. I had the chance just last year to finally sit down and read the “Life & Times” trade and I was blown away by how entertaining and intelligent the story telling was, all while being accessible to somebody like me who only knew the character from the Duck Tales cartoon. I even bought the “Companion” trade which fills in parts of the story, but haven’t had the chance to read it yet. I can’t believe the works of Barks and Rosa haven’t done better in recent years in the American comics market. They’re just brilliant stuff…

Scarlet Witch in two words: Retcon Activator.

a different Dan

June 5, 2007 at 11:07 pm

I always thought the line from the theme song was “Tales of derring-do…” not “daring, new….”

Rohan Williams

June 6, 2007 at 12:30 am

Everybody loves Scrooge McDuck. I interviewed Larry Hama awhile back, and his dream project was to work on Disney’s Duck characters- and this is a guy known for writing Wolverine and G.I. Joe!

Here in The Netherlands there isn’t much of a comics market, it’s very far from a mainstream medium, more so than in the US.

There’s one exception to the rule; The Duck family. In fact, the weekly comic ‘Donald Duck’ (which features the entire Duck family and occasional other Disney comics) is the most popular magazine of this country. Matter of fact, about half of the Duck comics being published worldwide(aside from Don Rosa) are all made by Dutch artists. “If you want to make a living in comics you better practice drawing beaks” is a phrase often uttered among cartoonists over here.

Superman, Spidey, Batman, there not even close in popularity to Scrooge McDuck or most other members of the Duck family over here. And I too, just like almost any Dutch citizen, have fond memories of lots of these comics. Good pick.

Although not necessarily comics related, I always wanted to jump into and then swim in a giant pool of gold coins. I suppose my swimming skills are inferior to that lovable, wealthy fowl.

The Kirbydotter

June 6, 2007 at 6:22 am

Scrooge McDuck is the best!
When I was a young kid I only bought “serious” comic books, meaning Super-heroes or monsters or cowboys (mainly Rawhide Kid) but certainly not funny animal cartoons that were just for babies!

Except for Uncle Scrooge!
I had tried one issue (can’t remember which) and it was most certainly drawn by Carl Barks (althought I didn’t know him at the time) because it involved a high adventure type of story (in the Himalayas?).
I was hooked and I added Uncle Scrooge to my regular series. The only “funny stuff” on my buying list.

I got back on Uncle Scrooge with Gladstone and added Mickey and Donald to my favorite titles.

Those Whitman and Gold Key covers bring me back to very fond childhood memories, even though I read mostly french reprints of Disneys. I still remember those from the “Hey Kids! Comics” wire spining racks. And those cool 3-packs…

In Italy Donald Duck (heavily laced with Uncle Scrooge stories) is the only Disney character besides Mickey Mouse to sustain a weekly digest.

In fact, I was just there, and I made a point to buy the latest one. I read all about the latest attempt to steal Uncle Scrooge’s lucky dime on the flight out.

Other Dan, I agree, it’s Tales of Daring-do or derring-do…seems to be some debate on which is the spelling.

Pesonaly, I prefer Rosa drawn US to Barks drawn…something Rosa once chastised me on Usenet for….I just prefer his line work.

Yes! Yes! Yes! Awesome! Yes!

The lyrics above also leave out a verse (not used in the actual show, IIRC). Here’s the entire thing, with corrected chorus:

Life is like a hurricane
Here in Duckburg
Race cars, lasers, aeroplanes
It’s a duck-blur
Might solve a mystery
Or rewrite history

CHORUS:
DuckTales (oooh ooooh)
Every day they’re out there making
DuckTales (oooh ooooh)
Tales of daring-do bad and good
LuckTales (oooh ooooh)

When it seems they’re heading for the
Final curtain
Cool deduction never fails
That’s for certain
The worst of messes
Become successes

CHORUS

D-D-D-Danger! Watch behind you
There’s a stranger out to find you
What to do? Just grab on to some DuckTales

CHORUS

D-D-D-Danger! Watch behind you
There’s a stranger out to find you
What to do? Just grab on to some …

CHORUS (Twice)

Not pony tales or cotton tales, no
DuckTales (ooh ooooh)

Uncle Scrooge is the greatest comic book character ever created. F@*k Superman, it’s all about McDuck baby!

Antonio Perales del Hierro

November 2, 2010 at 1:03 am

Oh yeah? I’m a comic freak/collector (preferably Golden Age), and illustrator/cartoonist. I attended segregated schools, and if there are still any doofuses who think that they only served to “separate children, and it’s a RIGHT!”, get over it! I learned to read from the big stack of comics my aunts and uncles had ( Archie; Mortimer Mouse; Pie Face Prince; Katy Keene; Submariner; Captain Midnight; Police Comics;Superman; Batman and Robin; Toonerville Trolley; The Spirit; Green Hornet; Mickey Mouse; Looney Tunes; etc., in the first grade. When I returned to live with my mom’s family I immediately checked out the texts for good stuff, only to encounter the “Dick and Jane” childish babble. The third grade was the same, and so was the fourthgrade and the fifth as well.Those s.o.b.’s very much in the pocket of the Southern California citrus industry were making sure that they we’re keeping chicanos illiterate, passing one out of three to the next grade as well, literally helping to asure a troubled life, and low end jobs, if that.Of course I did not know this then. Check out Ariel Dorfmann’s How to Read Donald Duck, and stop gushing about how cool Scrooge McDuck is. Scrooge of my era is a racist, imperialist pig, and nothing less! I can’t decide who is worse, Scrooge or Tin Tin, which the Main Library here in San Francisco keeps under wraps, unless it is rwquested, it is so virulantly racist and stigmatising of, for example Mexican, Cental American and South American indigenous peoples.

Antonio Perales del Hierro

November 2, 2010 at 1:29 am

Oh yeah? I’m a comic freak/collector (preferably Golden Age), and illustrator/cartoonist. I attended segregated schools, and if there are still any doofuses who think that they only served to “separate children, and it’s a RIGHT!”, get over it! I learned to read from the big stack of comics my aunts and uncles had ( Archie; Mortimer Mouse; Pie Face Prince; Katy Keene; Submariner; Captain Midnight; Police Comics;Superman; Batman and Robin; Toonerville Trolley; The Spirit; Green Hornet; Mickey Mouse; Looney Tunes; etc., in the first grade. When I returned to live with my mom’s family I immediately checked out the texts for good reading, in Casa Blanca Elementary fonly to encounter the “Dick and Jane” childish babble. The third grade was the same, and so was the fourth grade and the fifth as well.Those s.o.b.’s very much in the pocket of the Southern California citrus industry were making sure that they we’re keeping chicanos illiterate, so as to provide a sizeable labor pool,passing one out of three to the next grade as well, literally helping to asure a troubled life, and low end jobs, if that.Of course I did not know this then. Check out Ariel Dorfmann’s How to Read Donald Duck, and stop gushing about how cool Scrooge McDuck is. Scrooge of my era is a racist, imperialist pig, and nothing less! I can’t decide who is worse, Scrooge or Tin Tin, which the Main Library Children’s Deparment here in San Francisco keeps under wraps, unless it is requested, it is so virulantly racist and stigmatising of, for example Mexican, Cental American and South American indigenous peoples. Tin Tin is still disgusting, even after the “changes” made. Now instead of referring to native peoples as “Ignorant, scummy red-skins”, as before, he goes about playing “little white hero” and saving the same people fom peril. It is called paternalism, O.K.?

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