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She-Hulk #21 Review

This issue marks the end of Dan Slott’s tenure on She-Hulk, and it finishes off with a cute, yet fairly mean-spirited “fix” for Marvel continuity, done with more metafictive elements than a dozen John Barth stories.

All in all, though, it was a good comic book, partially in spite of itself.

SHEHULK021.jpg

I don’t feel bad about spoiling the “fix,” because that’s really not the main point of the comic book – it’s just a backdrop to the main story. But if you really don’t want to know what the “fix” is, stop reading now!!!

Okay – still with me?

The “fix” is that there is a parallel universe to the Marvel Earth that has counterparts to the people on Marvel’s Earth. They figured out a way to travel to Marvel’s Earth, at which point they would then become that person on Marvel’s Earth. So if a fellow like Aleksei Sytsevich were to make the trip, he would leave as a normal person, but when he arrived on Marvel’s Earth, he would be his Marvel counterpart, which would be the Rhino.

The whole thing is a big vacation destination on the other Earth, but the trouble is, they’re all given “Handbooks” to read to explain what they are like on Marvel’s Earth. Some of the people don’t bother to read the handbooks, so they end up acting differently from what they are “supposed” to act like on Marvel’s Earth.

This, therefore, “explains” why some characters act out of character. Why The Absorbing Man is a normal villain in the pages of Thor, but a sociopathic murderer in the pages of the Incredible Hulk.

This would be fair enough. It’s a cute enough bit, and it’s clear that Slott is not writing this as some grand, “This is how it REALLY IS,” because he obviously realizes that the odds are strongly against any other comic book using this explanation. It’s not exactly the most clever idea in the world (it is basically the same idea Peter David came up in in the pages of Captain Marvel, where he introduced a temporal warp to similarly explain away characters acting differently – the warp would create short-lived duplicates of characters), but it is cute enough.

However, the mean-spirited part comes from some of the dialogue, as characters meta-critique other Marvel writers who “don’t bother to read the handbook,” and make characters act out of character. Some of the language would be way too harsh coming from a blogger or a poster on a message board (I know I would never call a writer an “idiot” for writing a character differently from how I think they should behave), so it was surprising to see it appear in a comic from Marvel Comics themselves. Didn’t seem very nice. “What idiot thought that would be a good idea?” Stuff like that. Uncool.

As I mentioned before, though, that silliness was just the backdrop for the true star of Slott’s work, which is his characterization work, as Jennifer Walters uses the existence of the other world’s She-Hulk (the one who did, indeed, sleep with the Juggernaut) to re-evaluate her life and her place on this Earth. It is some gripping work by Slott, and he likewise does some nice work with Mallory Book and Pug, as Pug talks Mallory out of making a bad decision (by the way, I personally highly appreciate Slott giving the “Poochie guarantee” regarding Pug’s romantic interest in She-Hulk – “I can no longer have feelings for her”).

Rick Burchett and Cliff Rathburn do an excellent job on the artwork, very lush and evocative, perfect for the character-heavy work of Slott.

There is a rather odd metafictive moment where, out of (seemingly, at least to me) nowhere, Stu Cicero becomes Slott’s avatar, and discusses Slott’s departure from the book in pretty plain terms. It could (and heck, it probably IS) be seen as a bit excessive, but I think it comes off pretty sweetly, as though Slott truly wanted to interact with his readers (who are a loyal breed) and say goodbye. So it was pretty cute.

There are a couple of amusing jokes about Peter David, alluding to him taking over next issue. That was nice.

And finally, the issue ends with a truly tender moment, as Slott uses the dual dimensions to create a striking, and touching, ending.

Good work.

So yeah, other than the odd meanness with some of the dialogue, this was a very good issue, and if you are a big fan of this title, you probably share the disdain Slott shows for the writers in question, so you probably won’t have as much of a problem with the meanness as I did, so bear that in mind.

Recommended.

59 Comments

I loved the ‘A-Hole’ bit.

Brain,
Quick note: The “idiot” who thought putting Wiccan and Hulkling in the Initiative “was a good idea” was ME. :) (Remember, I write THE INITIATIVE). So I was being harshest on MYSELF. Hope that clears that up.
ttyl
Dan
;)

Is it just me, or is it really cool that the creators not only read these posts, but sometimes respond?

Mr. Slott, I’ve really enjoied your writing on She-Hulk. It’s definately NOT the normal comic book fare, which is quite refreshing. I’m sad to see you leave the title.

Slott is DA MAN!!!

Pity this series was never as popular as it deserved, but it’s still one of my favorite reads every month. I hope PAD does a good job on it (much like he is doing on X-Factor right now!)

And since Slott is here and mentioned Wiccan, I wonder how could he concile the tentative paternity of this hero (as mentioned in the second half of the Young Avengers series) and the AGE of his mother (who shouldn’t be NEARLY old enough to have a teenage son!). That took me totally out of the story when I read it!

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

Mr. Slott
Thank you very much for writing She-Hulk. It’s been a great ride and I’m sorry to see your time on it ending. You have a great sense of humor and a love of the material. I look forward to your future projects.

Thanks for the fun

Sean

I didn’t think it was mean at all – in a world built on continuity, to not do your research (or, worse, wilfully ignore established stories) is nothing short of criminal.

I’m not sure I’ll buy She-Hulk anymore – well done, Slott, you just lost David a reader, just by being awesome.

What’s a poochie guarantee?

“I didn’t think it was mean at all – in a world built on continuity, to not do your research (or, worse, wilfully ignore established stories) is nothing short of criminal.”

Ugh.

I agree Alan, I am not really sure if She-Hulk is going to continue to be on my comic list. I’ll give it a try but if it’s too serious a storyline now I’m just going to drop it.

Sean

p.s I mourn for Awesome Andy…:(

I didn’t think it was mean at all – in a world built on continuity, to not do your research (or, worse, wilfully ignore established stories) is nothing short of criminal.
I always get incredibly depressed reading statements like this.

Dan Slott is one of my favourite writers at Marvel. Everything he’s done so far has at LEAST been decent. Looking forward to his Spider-man.

And that is one of my favourite covers EVER.
So cute.

Well, to be fair, the expression “What idiot thought that would be a good idea?” is almost certainly what popped into the majority of readers’ heads after She-Hulk slept with the Juggernaut.

So does this mean that the Tony Stark who was behind the Super Hero Registration Act and who acted like such a ruthless, manipulative fascist was actually the Tony Stark from this other Earth on vacation who didn’t bother to read the Handbook he was assigned by his travel agent? :)

“I didn’t think it was mean at all – in a world built on continuity, to not do your research (or, worse, wilfully ignore established stories) is nothing short of criminal.”

“I always get incredibly depressed reading statements like this.”

I can’t imagine you’d want to have a long talk with me, then. Pretty much the whole reason I still follow comics is due to an interest in the creative potential of a shared universe growing over years and decades.

I think it’s hit the point where the architecture behind it interests me at least as much as the stories themselves. It’s very much something unique to Marvel and DC in all of media.

That’s why I’m looking forward to Morrison’s Final Crisis so much. He’s been talking about sentient universes for the last couple of years. I’m really curious to see what he comes up with.

“in a world built on continuity, to not do your research (or, worse, wilfully ignore established stories) is nothing short of criminal.”

In fact, it is at least a little bit short of being criminal, inasmuch as there are no laws on the books in any country on this planet which outlaw it.

“I didn’t think it was mean at all – in a world built on continuity, to not do your research (or, worse, wilfully ignore established stories) is nothing short of criminal.”

No, its far, far, faaaar short of criminal. You don’t care for it. Very, very different things.
At the very worst, it MAY be a tad apathetic.

I had the same problem with the idiot comment too, but now that Dan has chimed in, I see the humor in it. As it was a sentiment I saw mentioned by fans, I think its conclusion was funny.
Thanks Dan for making my last issue of She-Hulk one of the good ones.

The “idiot” comment seems like the exact sort of thing one would find posted on the Marvel boards at CBR. It doesn’t seem so outrageous to me.

LOL, I was just about to point out that the “idiot” was Slott, who wrote the Initiative, but the man himself beat me to it!

Great issue, by the way. Sad to see it end.

“The “idiot” comment seems like the exact sort of thing one would find posted on the Marvel boards at CBR. It doesn’t seem so outrageous to me.”

And I believe that was the whole point. The characters pissing and moaning about the “idiots,” after all, are Slott’s stand-ins for overly anal online fans. (See their introduction in issue 12 of the previous volume.)

At one point, one of them addresses an ignored Captain Ultra story, saying, “Did *no one* read ‘Marvel Comics Presents?’ This is literally begging the question, since the obvious answer (and one I gave, out loud, when I read that scene) is “no.”

And I believe that was the whole point. The characters pissing and moaning about the “idiots,” after all, are Slott’s stand-ins for overly anal online fans.

Right, which is why I disagree with Brian that “Some of the language would be way too harsh coming from a blogger or a poster on a message board”. Yes, it is hyperbolic, but it’s not beyond believability.

“Would be way too harsh coming from a blogger or a poster on a message board” does not mean that it does not actually occur.

Of course it does, and it is way too harsh when it does.

So if I think it is way too harsh coming from a blogger or a message board poster, I certainly find it way too harsh coming from a comic book.

Please.
Deborah says “idiot” on Everybody Loves Raymond every darn episode. And that’s one of the most PG shows around.
Ren & Stimpy used “idiot” left and right in a kiddie cartoon.
“Idiot” is not harsh.
And, again, BTW, the only person who is DIRECTLY called an idiot in this comic… is ME!
:)

Brain,
Quick note: The “idiot” who thought putting Wiccan and Hulkling in the Initiative “was a good idea” was ME. :) (Remember, I write THE INITIATIVE). So I was being harshest on MYSELF. Hope that clears that up.
ttyl
Dan
;)

I appreciate you including yourself, Dan, but I do not think that including yourself makes the other shots okay. Just like Ricky Bobby prefacing shots with “With all due respect,” I don’t think self-flagellation excuses shots, either.

“What? So when something messed-up happens, we have to assume it’s because some idiot…who couldn’t be bothered to take five minutes to read the damned handbook?”

“Yeah, and then some A-Hole that let them get through”

That, I would say, would be the harshest shot in the comic book, and it was not directed at yourself.

I do not mean, though, to give off the impression that you are the only person to do this. It’s a common enough practice. It’s just one I do not like, as I think it is kinda mean. I didn’t like it when Peter David did it to Erik Larsen in Incredible Hulk (TWICE!), or when John Byrne did it to Chris Claremont in Fantastic Four, or when Tom DeFalco did it to Christopher Priest in Thor. I don’t like the practice as a whole.

Other folks obviously differ on the treatment, though. And I imagine quite a few readers very much enjoy seeing these little shots.

In the end, though, it is not a huge deal, as I still enjoyed the comic book. I thought it was a strong book, especially with the excellent character interactions you included (that ending was golden).

But Brian, all the shots of creator vs. creator you cited were specific creators slamming specific creators. Who specifically was that “harsh” line aimed at? It was basically a general lob at those who practice in– well– NOT doing their job.

IMO, creators who choose to use an established character– and don’t even take 5 darn minutes to do the most BASIC of research– aren’t just doing a disservice to fans– they’re insulting and devalueing the work of the creators who’ve come before them– people who BUILT this industry that today’s creators are lucky enough to work in. And to me, that’s a million times harsher than any perceived slam I threw out to “the room.”

As for the harsh tone… look, we’ve had YEARS of a Marvel that doesn’t give half a flying crap about the UNIVERSE its characters exist in. All that matters is Joey’s pals have work, no matter how much research they do, or how responsible they are at making deadlines. The pendulum do swing, and as far as I’m concerned, this issue wasn’t harsh ENOUGH to make up for the ineptitude in the past few years (ie, Bendis filling the prison in New Avengers 1 with multiple dead villains, Johnny Blaze’s soul no longer belonging to Mephisto but the world’s most cardboard cutout joke of a Lucifer). But hopefully it sets a precedence.

I think the Gruen would be proud, and that’s pretty much the highest compliment I can give to a Marvel writer.

“They told an excellent story,” would seem to be a higher compliment by an amazing magnitude.

So if I think it is way too harsh coming from a blogger or a message board poster, I certainly find it way too harsh coming from a comic book.

Even when the comic book in question is satirizing said blogger/poster?

I don’t think you can fault Slott for using the same tone as the subject of his mocking when he’s mocking them.

“They told an excellent story,” would seem to be a higher compliment by an amazing magnitude.

You mean to say that a story in service of continuity is not automatically excellent?

Blasphemy!

Fair enough, Dan (Slott, not Apodaca). That’s not how I read it, but I can understand how you were meaning it otherwise.

Or a story not in service of continuity could in fact be good? ALSO HORRIBLE TO THINK ON!

Cue Nextwave theme song.

Oh, and Dan:
I will greatly miss your excellent work on this book and I really hope your Spidey run is anywhere near as good.

Jeepers Creepers, Brian, Slott has to *work* with these people, facrineoutloud. I’m relatively sure that if they thought he was being too harsh, they could tell him directly. Have a sense of humour, man! It was all good-natured and gentle.

Scott Frank, the screenwriter of Minority Report and Get Shorty, is friends with another writer, Ed Solomon, and always includes a a nasty reference to him somewhere in the dialogue. In “Out of Sight”, Eddie Solomon was a cross-dressing drug-dealer. In another, he wa a pedaphile clown. It’s a joke between too friends. Slott’s thing is an incredibly light-hearted jape compared to that. Or do you think Frank needs to apologize immediately to Solomon?

I did not read it that way, obviously, Prankster.

You think the shots are good-natured, I differ. But as I mentioned earlier to Dan, I will allow that perhaps that was how they were intended.

GET BACK TO WORK!!!

Love,
Your Editor.

That “fix” basically describes how insular comics have become where they need to explain away every single stupid storyline involving random characters. Screw continuity and screw She-Hulk, that review just helped me decide not to get the remaining trades.

wow, somebody missed the point…

So was the Leader’s trial from #19 wrapped up? I scanned #20 in the store and didn’t see any courtroom scenes, and it doesn’t sound like #21 had any either.

If I were writing a historical novel set during the Civil War, I would be expected to get my historical facts right.

If I were writing a book set in the current war on Iraq, I would be expected to get my facts straight on the weapons and equipment our troops use.

But if I’m writing a comic book set in a shared universe with a long history, not only can I get away with not doing research, it’s actually the fans’ fault for noticing when I make a mistake! Stupid anal-retentive fans. Why do they pay so much attention to continuity? By the way, you have to buy this comic because it’s going to affect future continuity, big time!

You want to play in the sandbox, you have to play nice with other people’s toys. Nobody forced Mark Millar to set ‘Civil War’ in the mainstream Marvel Universe. Nobody forced him to say, “This story is in continuity, and fits in with the previous 43 years of Marvel history.” He could have written it as an alternate-universe story, or as a pastiche with the names changed, or any number of other ways to tell it without the restrictions of having to do his research and make sure it was consistent with other stories set in the same universe. But he chose to set it in the Marvel Universe. He made that choice because he wanted the money of fans who care about continuity–that carries with it an obligation to get continuity right. Otherwise you’re just reaching into their pockets and stealing their money.

(Delete “Millar” and insert any continuity-lazy writer where applicable.)

Again, it is not the “lack of continuity” I bemoan, and other fans with me (and, from the sound of things, Dan Slott.) It is the fundamental dishonesty of insisting that the continuity of stories you tell is vitally important and other people should pay attention to it, but the continuity of the stories before yours are unimportant and to be disregarded because it would make things inconvenient for you as a writer.

Here here, John! Well said-I agree 100%

[...] I haven’t read Brian’s review, but judging by the comments, a lot of people have a lot to say about this, so I’ll just leave it at that and direct you there.  Other than that, this is just a reset button.  It’s a sweet issue from a guy who was done a nice job (for the most part; we won’t talk about Starfox and the Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. stories) for 33 issues of a title.  And that’s okay. [...]

“An excellent story”? It used to be, you could have an excellent ISSUE. Now, it takes forever just to tell ONE story, and even longer to gauge whether it’s good or not. Is it any wonder the biggest culprits of decompression are the same people with little to no regard for the universe they’re writing it?

Look at it this way, a whole story smeared out across, say, 6 issues. Just one story, not a storyline, it’s ONE DAMN STORY, padded to hell. Each issue tells part of it, none actually being internally sound enough to stand on its own. The bigger problem is, it makes focusing the on the mistakes so much more unavoidable. You take a one issue tale and stretch it out to last six months or more, it’s like dwelling on a single panel or two for a longer amount of time. So many readers are looking for sustenance to the issue that they aren’t getting because the writers are spreading things out as lazily as possible, like watering down Coke at a Burger King to save money, that the wrinkles and blemishes in the story get all the more highlighted.

But what the hell do I know? I actually give a damn about continuity, so that immediately rules me out as being listened to.

“So was the Leader’s trial from #19 wrapped up? I scanned #20 in the store and didn’t see any courtroom scenes, and it doesn’t sound like #21 had any either.”

It wrapped up off panel. He won, apparently.

Right, yeah. Slott’s right, Cronin’s wrong.

What’s a poochie guarantee, already?

It’s like a regular guarantee, only more proactive.

Dan, didn’t Hulkling and Wiccan, along with most of the other heroes, join the Pro-Registration side at the end of Civil War #7 when Cap surrendered?

If they’re not registered, they’re either fugitives or retired.

Dan,

“Everybody Loves Raymond” is family fare? I know it was the most popular sitcom in America for several years, but the two episodes I watched had to do with Raymond obsessing over his wife getting breast implants, and the second obsessing over the hot girls that lived in the apartment complex his brother was moving into.

It just shows that the common value or what is considered acceptable in society slips a little bit each decade. A decade or two earlier and the perfect family show was considered to be the Cosby Show. The Cosby Show could be Ozzie and Harriet for all it has in common with what is today considered family entertainment.

Right, yeah. Slott’s right, Cronin’s wrong.

I disagree.

But thanks for the scintillating, well-reasoned comment.

What’s a poochie guarantee, already?

When they got rid of Poochie in the episode, they had a signed guarantee that he would never return. Here, Slott basically had a signed guarantee that the Pug/She-Hulk romance was not going to happen.

But Brian, your argument isn’t too well-reasoned, either. You haven’t yet explained why you think a shot directed at HIMSELF (which is the one you specifically singled out) and non-specific shots “at the room” are overly harsh, especially when you compare it to specific one-on-one incidents.

Or are there more specific shots geared directly to one creator that nobody has mentioned yet?

If not, I’m afraid you haven’t got a leg to stand on. Without more evidence, you just sound uptight.

And I refuse to believe that you, Brian Cronin, are uptight. I REFUSE!!!!

The harshest shot, as I said above, was a general one – “What? So when something messed-up happens, we have to assume it’s because of some idiot who couldn’t be bothered to read their darned handbook?”

In fact, that line is the basic punchline of the entire gag.

All the set-up in the issue leads to that joke.

It is quickly followed by the “a-hole” line, which he does use his characters to demonstrate, but as I said before, I do not think including oneself alleviates shots towards others, even if, for the most part, the other shots are general.

That being said, as ALSO noted earlier, I certainly allowed that Slott very well could have intended it all to be good-natured fun, and I was reading it as meaner than intended.

This seemed well-settled, so to then see some nonsensical “he’s right, you’re wrong” comment was quite irritating.

There it is again. “For the most part.”

Are there any shots in the book that are not A) general or B) directed at Slott himself? If there are, you may not be overreacting.

But if there aren’t, your complaint unfairly puts Slott in a negative light. “Allowing for the possibility” that you misinterpreted his intent is not enough…it’s a total misread on your part. Don’t make Slott look careless if it’s just your weird interpretation. And it’s beginning to look that way, as your “harshest” shot is not that harsh, and directed at nobody.

How can a general shot be harsh? It’s like a non-lawyer getting offended on behalf of lawyers when someone makes a joke.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

September 9, 2007 at 6:53 pm

ll that matters is Joey’s pals have work, no matter how much research they do, or how responsible they are at making deadlines.

That’s just sad, dude.
I’m not a big fan of the direction Marvel’s books have gone lately, and so I don’t read as much of them, but to blame it on Joe Q just giving his friends jobs is ridiculous – the comics are selling more copies than they did when he took the current teams on.
Marvel may be where your imagination likes to play, and you’ve got a strong sense of identification with the characters/’universe’, but MArvel’s a compnay – on the stock market at that – and so their duty, first and foremost, is to make money.
Joe Q and Dan Buckely have actually done that, so cries of nepotism seem oddly out of place.

There it is again. “For the most part.”

Are there any shots in the book that are not A) general or B) directed at Slott himself? If there are, you may not be overreacting.

But if there aren’t, your complaint unfairly puts Slott in a negative light. “Allowing for the possibility” that you misinterpreted his intent is not enough…it’s a total misread on your part. Don’t make Slott look careless if it’s just your weird interpretation. And it’s beginning to look that way, as your “harshest” shot is not that harsh, and directed at nobody.

How can a general shot be harsh? It’s like a non-lawyer getting offended on behalf of lawyers when someone makes a joke.

I do not think it makes a difference whether Slott identifies “the idiots” or not, as I think the sentiment itself is kinda mean, whether generalized or specified, but if you really think it makes a difference, then sure, here are some writers being identified as “idiots” (and this is just off the top of my head, I’d have to reread the issue for more):

Chuck Austen (She-Hulk in Uncanny X-Men)
Warren Ellis (Monica Rambeau in Nextwave)
Brian Michael Bendis (White Tiger in Daredevil)

And as for Slott’s intent, my point was that I will certainly allow that Slott did not intend for it to come out as mean as it did in the comic book. That does not mean that I do not think that it did come of as such.

It does make a huge difference, Brian. The way you were describing it, I had no idea that there actually were writers specifically singled out. Now that I know, it does seem kind of unnecessary. So thank you for clarifying.

Brian,
I see where you’re coming from. But I really think you’re reading too much into any specific jabs. I can see the places where YOU think you see jabs (except for White Tiger. Where are you getting that from? Just because the male version of the White Tiger is in the background? The story recquired that we see characters who are supposed to be dead and/or in the wrong costumes. I mean, just because 3-D Man, Egghead, and Hammer and Anvil are in there– do you think I’m taking jabs at guys like Len Wien and Roger Stern? Come on. Now you’re REALLY scraping for stuff in an attempt to make your point.)

And again, the biggest, broadest, and most specific shot is taken at myself. So I think that buys me a little leeway.

I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree. I didn’t find the issue too harsh. To me, the word “idiot” isn’t like dropping the f-bomb. Idiot. Say it with me a few times. It’s not all that harsh. If the word has more weight to you personally? Then I’m sorry if I offended you– or took away some of your enjoyment of the issue. Different people have different “hot buttons” and that’s cool.

Case in point:
Years ago I was doing a Ren & Stimpy signing and a young boy handed me every single R&S comic, special, and trade paperback I’d ever written. And every issue in the stack– save one– was all weathered, cracked, and beaten up from being read over and over again. The boy was very shy and as I signed all his copies, his mother went on and on about how this was his favorite comic in the world, how he carried them around with him wherever he went, and how she was so glad that these got him into reading. Suddenly, I hit the ONE comic in the stack that was pristine and in mint condition. I’d been joking with the boy, getting him to laugh a couple times, so I leaned over and kidded, “Hey, what’s the matter? Did this one stink or something?” And, bam, the mother went off on me.

It was a total Jekyll and Hyde moment. She was frothing mad and told me that when her son read that comic he cried and cried– it made him feel horrible– and how could I WRITE SOMETHING LIKE THAT?! And that the ONLY reason her son kept it– the ONLY reason that she didn’t throw it into the TRASH WHERE IT BELONGED was because he wanted to keep a complete set. I was TOTALLY confused. I know I hinted at some off color stuff (usually “bathroom” humor) in the book. But for the life of me, I couldn’t think of ANYTHING offensive in that issue. (And keep in mind, on top of Marvel approving everything in the issue, squeaky clean Nickelodeon kept an even tighter watch on us before ANYTHING saw print).

The pristine copy in question was R&S #11 where Ren was learning stress management techniques for controlling his anger, Ren learned a bunch of silly yoga positions, with each one getting him into more and more knots. They were: the monkey, the ostrich, the watusi, the dislexic pretzel, the incontinent flamingo, and the spasmatic jelly roll.

Well… It turns out that the boy was dislexic. He was very self-conscious about it. And he thought that this meant that Ren and Stimpy were making fun of his condition. And it was all my fault. I created this thing that broke this boy’s heart and made him cry about one of his favorite things. I was devestated. The following Monday I was trying to sanitize ALL of my scripts. I didn’t want to produce ANYTHING that might offend ANYONE ever again! And it took some good friends– and sensible editors– to knock me out of that!

Look, you’re always going to offend SOMEBODY or land on the wrong side of someone’s sensibilities. That’s the nature of the game. Sorry a gruff character saying “idiot” was one of your tipping points.

Again, the point I THINK I’m making is valid. If you’re a writer in this industry, if you’re working in a shared universe, you owe it to the fans– and to the writers who went before you– to at LEAST do 5 minutes worth of research on the characters you’re using. If not? Why not make up your own? Bendis and Jenkins have shown through fan-favorite characters like Jewel and Sentry– that it’s possible to CREATE brand new characters with previously “unseen” histories. I think it would be GREAT if creators had a need for a character to fulfill a specific story need– make one up. Think of all the cool NEW characters we’d get!

And, you know what? Even if someone does HOURS and HOURS of research– mistakes are still going to happen. We’re all human. I’m just saying a LITTLE bit of research– 5 minutes– isn’t going to kill anybody. And that should be part of our job.

Whew!

Dan,

“We have different sensibilities” definitely seems like a fair way of describing it.

Witnessing someone get repeatedly upset over the use of the word ‘idiot’ is probably the girliest thing I have ever seen in my goddamn life.

Steven Segal, TOUGH GUY

September 11, 2007 at 7:00 am

Your whole goddamn life as a cowardly internet pseudonym?

Why thank you, Steven.

In any event, Chuck, if you wish to categorize it as “upset,” that’s your right, but I, naturally, do not see it as so. Heck, I even recommended the issue in question. I just thought the “idiots” shots were kinda mean and unnecessary.

As for the “repeatedly” part, I am only responding to people who “repeatedly” take issue with my point. If they were to drop it, so would I.

Instead, we have random drive-by comments like yours and Evan’s.

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