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CSBG Archive

Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #128

This is the one-hundred and twenty-eighth in a series of examinations of comic book urban legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous one-hundred and twenty-seven. Click here for a similar archive, only arranged by subject.

Let’s begin!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Marvel was planning a Ghost Rider/Casper the Friendly Ghost crossover

STATUS: True

While hard to believe, at one point, Marvel was actually a planning a crossover between these two characters!!

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It is a little less surprising when you take into consideration the 1994 crossover between Marvel and Archie Comics, where Archie and the Punisher met up.

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If two such disparate character as Archie and the Punisher could team-up, why not Ghost Rider and Casper?

This must have been going through writer Ivan Velez, Jr.’s mind when the Ghost Rider writer pitched the story idea a few years after the Archie/Punisher crossover.

The basic gist of the story is that a bad guy has replaced Richie Rich’s father and is heck-bent on taking over control of the Harvey Universe, forcing Casper and Wendy the Witch to come up with a way to fight him. Wendy casts a spell to make Casper stronger, and the end result is that Casper is replaced by…the Ghost Rider!!

Meanwhile, back on the Marvel Universe, when Dan Ketch transforms into the Ghost Rider, he instead finds himself transformed into…Casper!!!

Ghost Rider becomes a hero in the Harvey Universe while Casper becomes a wanted “man” in the Marvel Universe. After Ghost Rider saves the day, though, things are put back in their place.

It’s definitely a cute pitch by Velez. Here are two sample chapters from his pitch (the pitch was for a 38-page, 9-chapter comic:

SIX:

Cut back to the void, as Casper appears. He’s confused, but before he has much time to think about his situation—

Danny, back in the bank, is on the ground. He crawls behind a pillar, hoping to hide himself from the other’s eyes. The bankrobbers are getting all the cash. Danny calls on the GhostRider. He begins to melt away in a cloud of hell fire…. melts away… going into the void.

In the Void, Casper starts to disappear. He is scared and confused.

Casper appears in Danny’s place… in the middle of the bank robbery. Everything in the bank freezes for a second as they all gape at this funny little ghost. Casper, confused, says his name.

One of the super- bankrobbers spouts off some generic supervillain dialog and then shoots at Casper with a laser blast. Casper is freaked. He’s never seen so much violence. He fights the impulse to run away. He has to help the innocent people.

Casper grabs the guns out of the bankrobbers’ hands and flies them out the window. He then takes the velvet ropes from the line dividers and proceeds to tie them all up together. When the police come in, they find the super robbers tied up.

When the police captain asks questions about who did all this fine work, Casper appears in front o him. The police captain then proceeds to let out the most shrill, high pierced scream of fright ever heard in a comic book. Casper has to cover his ears.

They start shooting at him, and Casper flies out of the bank, into the Marvel Universe, a wanted man. ;)

SEVEN:

The Ghost Rider stands in the forest. Wendy is very scared of him. She keeps calling him Casper, but GR doesn’t respond. Pause. Then, GR asks what place this is. Wendy explains the situation. GR takes a look around He senses the purity of this place… the goodness…

***GR laughs. (This is part of his shtick now… the menacing laugh) His laugh bellows through the forest. The machines stop work for a second… it was even scary to them. GR tells her if she wants a champion, she’ll get a champion. This place is well worth defending. GR creates his bike out of hellfire and proceeds to go against the machines. He does a good job of flattening the first few dozen, but they seem to be self regenerating.

The evil Mr. Rich shows up and begins to laugh. He presses a special button on a remote control, and the robots start jumping on top of each other, connecting like Lego pieces. There’s nothing they can do. Their world is over. Robot Rich jumps into the giant robot body and becomes one with the rest. He gets bigger, absorbing the robots around him.

He becomes a giant and grabs GR in his giant fist. He then opens his mouth wide and swallows him up. The giant robot laughs. Maybe he’s found a new power source after all.

Wendy whips up a lightning bolt and knocks the robot Mr. Rich down. He grabs her, and laughs as he starts to squeeze.

Neat, huh?

I’d share more, but to be honest, I feel a bit weird sharing as much as I did. Velez has been very gracious in the past in sharing his unused script for Ghost Rider #93 (which ultimately WAS used), so maybe he’ll be willing to post the pitch somewhere! That’d be awesome!

Anyhow, Marvel purchased the pitch from Velez, but Harvey was a little too hesitant in making the project, so ultimately the project was scuttled (Velez was paid a kill-fee).

It’s too bad, really, as it is seems like a really neat project, and one that (hint, hint, Marvel and Harvey) would still easily work today, just with Johnny Blaze in the place of Dan Ketch.

A gazillion thanks to Ivan Velez, Jr. for going above and beyond the call of duty by both locating, then giving me access to, his original pitch for the project. Thanks so much, Ivan!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Peter David was planning on turning Supergirl into a team book.

STATUS: True

After the recent Urban Legends installment that featured a bit on Supergirl, a reader asked about Peter David’s Supergirl, and whether it was true that he was going to make the book “Supergirls.”

And well, that was, in fact, the case!

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Courtesy of our SDCC blog correspondent, Kelson, here is a quote from Peter David on his plans for the title had it not been cancelled at issue #80

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(the piece can be found at PAD’s blog here):

When I first embarked on the storyline, I was told by the powers-that-be that I could use Kara for six issues. That was it. Six issues, no more.

I hoped to change their minds. Because I was positive the addition of Kara would bring in readers in droves.

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What I was hoping was that support and interest for the series would be so major, so undeniable, so impossible to ignore, that I could use it as ammo to convince the PTB to change their mind and allow me to keep the character around. If that had happened, my intention was to turn the book into, effectively, a team book. The “S” equivalent of “Birds of Prey.” Linda would have been Superwoman (for want of a better name), Kara would have been officially Supergirl, and I would have brought in Power Girl to boot. The tone of the book would have been straight up fun–three super blondes getting into adventures. In my truly demented best-case scenario, I would have subtitled the book “Blonde Justice.”

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That was my “A” plan. Unfortunately, the lack of support up front torpedoed it. Had we seen the kind of support for issue #75 that we wound up getting with issue #80, and built from there, I might have been able to pull it off. As it was, I wasn’t.

So there ya go!!

Thanks to Kelson and Peter David!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Marvel lost the Godzilla license because they were not drawing the character the way Toho wanted.

STATUS: False

I was asked about this one a loooong time ago (we’re talking almost two years, heck, maybe LONGER), by, I believe, commenter suedenim, about Marvel’s late-70s comic series starring Toho Productions’ famous movie monster, Godzilla.

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The series began in 1977, and ended fairly shortly after, in 1979, after only two years of comics.

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Sue had heard that the reason Marvel ceased publication of the title was because Toho had problems with the way Marvel had depicted Godzilla in the comic, but after broaching the topic with the editor of Godzilla, Jim Shooter, the reason appeared to be a typical refrain for licensed comics.

The same problem that led to the ending of Star Wars, Transformers and GI Joe – sales.

I asked Shooter, “Did Toho back out of the Godzilla series because of problems over how Godzilla was depicted in the comic?” and he replied

No. It wasn’t selling, so when the license ran out, we didn’t renew.

Reader Daniel wrote in the comments section an interesting further elaboration via Michael Eury’s awesome comic magazine, BACK ISSUE! –

Actually, BACK ISSUE! covered Marvel’s GODZILLA in some detail. Marvel had an initial license with Toho for 12 issues, after which they would have to go through the licensing process again. They paid a tidy sum to use Godzilla, but every time they asked about using Rodan or Mothra or any of Toho’s other creatures for a single issue story, Toho informed Marvel that they would have to pay another licensing fee for that chracter that would be the equivalent of what Marvel was already paying for using Godzilla for 12 issues! So, they came up with their own monsters for Godzilla to duke it out with.

Since it had been selling reasonably well, they went back to Toho to re-license Godzilla for a further dozen issues, only to find that Toho jacked up the fee. Although the series continued to sell at the same numbers, Marvel was now making less profit. So, as they headed towards #24, they planned on wrapping up the storylines, just in case. Sure enough, when Marvel went back to Toho, the movie studio wanted to charge an even higher licensing fee. Since this would have guaranteed that Marvel would be producing the comic at a loss, Marvel decided to drop it.

So there ya go, when Shooter says “It wasn’t selling, so when the license ran out, we didn’t renew,” he was meaning what Daniel explains in his comments – it wasn’t selling enough to pay for the licensing costs.

Thanks to suedenim for the suggestion, and thanks to Jim Shooter and Daniel (and BACK ISSUE!) for the answer!

Okay, that’s it for this week!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com.

See you next week!

55 Comments

Huh, early one this week.

The Casper/GR thing didn’t seem to have as much fun to it as the Archie/Punisher one did. Then again, I’m the guy who once pushed for Spider-Ham/Cerebus.

Oh, I don’t know – Ghost Rider wanting to protect a place simply because of its purity seemed like a neat idea, plus he was fighting a giant gestalt robot.

Hee, “Ghost Rider writer”.

I may have been the one who suggested the Godzilla legend. It seems a pretty widespread belief among the subset of hardcore Godzilla fans who pay any attention at all to the Marvel series that Toho was particularly upset with Herb Trimpe’s “off-model” depiction of Godzilla as very dinosaur-like, with no “gorilla” aspect to his face.

One example at hand is “A Critical History and Filmography of Toho’s Godzilla Series” by David Kalat. Kalat actually squashes a lot of Godzilla urban legends in this book, but is on far more uncertain ground when discussing the comic. He writes (citing an article in the “G-Fan” magazine), “Toho became frustrated with Marvel’s version of their icon, and did not renew Marvel’s license agreement as a result.”

Shooter’s explanation sounds a lot more plausible, particularly since the higher-profile animated Godzilla of the same period had more or less the same “dinosaurish” visual appearance as Marvel’s, and Toho presumably would’ve had the opportunity to approve or reject the model sheets for the cartoon series.

I’d just like to remind people: Not only did Peter David bring back Kara two years earlier than Jeph Loeb, but he actually had a plan for what to do with her.

There’s no justice, blonde or otherwise.

I love these. So interesting. BC — you have the hook-up with Jim Shooter?

You are a powerful man.

I think the failure of the Godzilla comics had more to do with the lack of other Toho giant critters. But licensing the other characters likely would have added to the cost. And like all Urban Legends, there is a gram of truth here; Toho is notorious for being difficult with their approval of licensed images.

It’s a pity Peter David’s Supergirls plan didn’t go through. Not only would that have been a good comic, it also would have spared the world the presence of Loeb’s Supergirl.

SanctumSanctorumComix

November 9, 2007 at 9:29 am

Now, if MARVEL never renewed the GODZILLA license, then HOW did they release the ESSENTIAL GODZILLA TPB a few years ago?

They must either have worked out a NEW deal or part of their ORIGINAL deal was the rights to reprint.

So… what the heck?
If they can do that with Godzilla (who is STILL a viable money-maker for parent-company; TOHO) but they won’t (or can’t seem to be able to) do the same for ROM (who is a dead character for Parker Bros (and now Hasbro – who own the rights…and are ALSO the manufacturers of MARVEL’s “Legends” action figures).

Inquiring cyborg minds need to know.

~P~
P-TOR

I still love that armored-up motorcycle because of the Charleston Chew give-away comic I got when I was 7.

Good work on these things, Brian. I can’t believe you’ve had fodder and done research for 128 of these on a consistent schedule.

How about checking in with Shooter for the real story of whatt happened with Steve Ditko and Defiant? Specifically, the Dark Dominion series was supposed to have Ditko co-plotting, but he just did the trading card zero issue and was gone.

Also, were there really original Ditko art cards released in the DD trading card set? I’ve never come across any evidence that anyone ever found one.

And, if you want to do an all Defiant edition, Was there ever really a spanish language version of Prudence and Caution (or any other Defiant books)?

I miss Defiant. And Broadway.

I think that Peter David should be able to re-do Loeb’s Supergirl and re-introduce Matrix so as to create Blonde Justice.

He should also write a solo title for Marvel’s Avenger named Justice.

Then, DC could put out Young Justice trade paperbacks, and Marvel could put out the New Universe title Justice into a collected format.

Finally, an Amalgam project could bring all of these characters together (Robin, Impulse, Superboy, Secret, Power Girl, Supergirl, Matrix, John Tensen, Justice, and why not Firestar).

It would, of course come out the same week as John Byrne’s Amalgam project making use of Doom Patrol, Fantastic Four, and She Hulk characters all trying to protect the identity of the Blonde Avenger. Aparantly, the reader that She-Hulk talks to is trying to convince the Blonde Avenger to join the Justice League since the Avengers never invted her to join. This would, naturally, involve her changing her name to Blonde Justice.

This would start a feud between David and Byrne, culminating in a Hell in the Cell match at SDCC 08 where they fight for the right to the use of the name Blonde Justice.

Maybe I should go lie down.

Theno

“Now, if MARVEL never renewed the GODZILLA license, then HOW did they release the ESSENTIAL GODZILLA TPB a few years ago?”

The license was available and they worked out an agreement for a single printing of the book. Note that it had $3 tagged onto the usual cover price for Essentials.

Dark Horse had the comics license for a number of years, starting in 1989 with a Steve Bissette drawn one shot that was soon followed by a six issue mini.

A feud between Peter David and John Byrne? Now you’re just pushing the limits of credibility, Theno. I could maybe believe the rest of it, but never that.

They must either have worked out a NEW deal or part of their ORIGINAL deal was the rights to reprint.

So… what the heck?
If they can do that with Godzilla (who is STILL a viable money-maker for parent-company; TOHO) but they won’t (or can’t seem to be able to) do the same for ROM (who is a dead character for Parker Bros (and now Hasbro – who own the rights…and are ALSO the manufacturers of MARVEL’s “Legends” action figures).

Inquiring cyborg minds need to know.

Yeah, like Anonymous said, it was a one-time deal, and I believe it took a bit of finagling on Marvel’s part to finally get done (and, as Anonymous also notes, for a higher price point).

I may have been the one who suggested the Godzilla legend. It seems a pretty widespread belief among the subset of hardcore Godzilla fans who pay any attention at all to the Marvel series that Toho was particularly upset with Herb Trimpe’s “off-model” depiction of Godzilla as very dinosaur-like, with no “gorilla” aspect to his face.

One example at hand is “A Critical History and Filmography of Toho’s Godzilla Series” by David Kalat. Kalat actually squashes a lot of Godzilla urban legends in this book, but is on far more uncertain ground when discussing the comic. He writes (citing an article in the “G-Fan” magazine), “Toho became frustrated with Marvel’s version of their icon, and did not renew Marvel’s license agreement as a result.”

Shooter’s explanation sounds a lot more plausible, particularly since the higher-profile animated Godzilla of the same period had more or less the same “dinosaurish” visual appearance as Marvel’s, and Toho presumably would’ve had the opportunity to approve or reject the model sheets for the cartoon series.

Sure sounds like you, Sue, as the comment also included the specific reference that Trimpe didn’t make Godzilla look enough like a gorilla, so it’s enough that I’ll edit you in as the person! :)

And yeah, so many other licensed usages of Godzilla look just like the Marvel version, it most likely was sales – especially since, as noted above, sales is such a common reason for not renewing licenses.

It would appear that, after the ’70s, Toho got a lot stricter in their Godzilla licensing requirements. Also, I believe the comic book came out during a period when Toho wasn’t making any new Godzilla movies for a while, so that probably made them more amenable to people offering checks to use the character.

Incidentally, as noted above, Marvel only bought the rights for *one* print run of Essential Godzilla. I gather that it was a pretty large print run and there’s no particular shortage of the book or anything, but if you have any interest whatsover in the series, it might make sense to grab a copy now, before the grabbing gets tough.

I think Toho had a lot of piccadillos regarding licensing. The 70s animated show for instance was not permitted to use the Godzilla roar. The Marvel Godzilla may not have had Rodan or Mothra, but it did have some very like-minded giant creatures in Yetrigar, Batragon, and the Beta-Beasts. I always liked how Marvel would include licensed characters like Godzilla and ROM into the “Marvel Universe” rather than stick them in their own private worlds.

[...] Casper and Ghost Rider? It’s not as crazy as Archie and Punisher, and this bizarre teamup almost came about, according to CBR’s urban legends revealed. [...]

John Harter - Waterfront Comics

November 9, 2007 at 12:36 pm

“Now, if MARVEL never renewed the GODZILLA license, then HOW did they release the ESSENTIAL GODZILLA TPB a few years ago?”

“The license was available and they worked out an agreement for a single printing of the book. Note that it had $3 tagged onto the usual cover price for Essentials.”

I thought that the larger price point was due to the fact that there were more pages in the Essential Godzilla than an average essential volume.

I would have totally read the Casper/Ghost Rider book, and I don’t like either character!

It should be pointed out that Marvel’s GODZILLA series did have a “final” issue, rather than just abruptly stop coming out, which was somewhat unusual for Marvel then. Perhaps because they knew they couldn’t tie up loose ends in other books (at least not those [loose ends, I mean] that specifically involved the Toho properties, anyway)?

mabantot na tae

November 9, 2007 at 1:12 pm

i think the punisher meets archie by marvel was really well done, i think the art was supplied by the legendary john buscema? actually i’m still looking for that book up until now, my store still hasn’t gotten a copy

Didn’t Godzilla kind of show up years later (in mutated form) in Iron Man #193? Dr. Demonicus refers to a giant dinasaur creature as his “old foe.”

Godzilla vs. Megalon and Terror of MechaGodzilla- weren’t they made in the mid to late ’70s?

I don’t know if the Godzilla rumor can be labeled “False”- Shooter’s answer is so vague and circumspect. I’m still trying to figure out what he could possibly mean.

“Didn’t Godzilla kind of show up years later (in mutated form) in Iron Man #193? Dr. Demonicus refers to a giant dinasaur creature as his “old foe.”

Yes, it’s believed that was Godzilla. Marvel did that a lot with characters from old liscenses, bringing them back for guest shots, like how the Shogun Warriors pilots turned up in a issue of Fantatstic Four. In Godzilla’s case, they had to change his appearance and not use his name.

I think Casper is the ghost or Richie Rich.

I, too, would have bought Ghost Rider/Casper!

Dave

The reason that Marvel’s GODZILLA had a “final” issue seems fairly clear. They had a license to produce 24 issues of GODZILLA, and figured out relatively early in the game that there wouldn’t be a 25th due to not extending the license.

It doesn’t read like a hasty ending, either – seems like the finale was planned reasonably far in advance, and there are no particular loose ends left dangling.

The tone of the book would have been straight up fun–three super blondes getting into adventures. In my truly demented best-case scenario, I would have subtitled the book “Blonde Justice.”

I just want to go on the record as stating that I would totally have gone into a comics store and created a pull list just for this one title. Damn.

As for Toho disapproving of Marvel’s depiction of Godzilla, I can think of at least one indication that they have no problem with it. On all of the official Toho-approved dvd releases of the Godzilla movies, there are icons on the back showing which monsters appear in a given film, and the one for Godzilla actually uses the same drawing that appeared in the corner box on his Marvel series.

Marvel’s Godzilla series, by the way, may be the reason paper was invented.

Elegance Liberty

November 9, 2007 at 3:58 pm

Wow… who did the art for those two Supergirl covers that look really ‘cartoon’-y? They rock! I wanna see if this artist has any more stuff elsewhere.

Brian from Canada

November 9, 2007 at 4:11 pm

km said…
I just want to go on the record as stating that I would totally have gone into a comics store and created a pull list just for this one title. Damn.

I totally agree. I was working in a comic store when Supergirl #75 came out. It was a huge success, mostly due to David’s version of Kara as the naive teenager being very refreshing for DC and comics in general — even WITH Young Justice on the shelves.

Most of the people I got reading the book were extremely disappointed at the speed it all had to end.

“Blonde Justice”?

C’mon. That’s just terrible.

Glad I could help!

“Blonde Justice”?

C’mon. That’s just terrible.

Yes, exactly. :)

As noted previously, I reserve a special warm’n'fuzzy spot in my heart for comics creators who’re willing to acknowledge just how goofy most superhero comics concepts actually are – thus are free to have lots and lots of fun with them. Especially since it’s apparently an extremely short list, nowadays.

Shortly after Peter David’s Blonde Justice ‘proposal’ became known to the public, the Superman editorial team produced a story arc that teamed Traci Thirteen, Natasha Irons, and a short-lived variant Supergirl named Cir-El into what seemed to be their response, a ‘Brunette Justice’. I don’t know if that was meant as a test or if there were plans to develop that team any further, but it sure looked to me as though they were already trying desperate tactics to make a Supergirl as successful as those final few issues of PAD’s run.

The Snappy Sneezer

November 10, 2007 at 1:00 pm

The Marvel Universe could use a Casper right now.

As noted previously, I reserve a special warm’n’fuzzy spot in my heart for comics creators who’re willing to acknowledge just how goofy most superhero comics concepts actually are – thus are free to have lots and lots of fun with them.

There’s a difference between goofy and bad. For example, “Chuck”? Goofy. “VIP”? Bad.

“Blonde Justice” is a BAD name.

“I think that Peter David should be able to re-do Loeb’s Supergirl and re-introduce Matrix so as to create Blonde Justice.

He should also write a solo title for Marvel’s Avenger named Justice.

Then, DC could put out Young Justice trade paperbacks, and Marvel could put out the New Universe title Justice into a collected format.

Finally, an Amalgam project could bring all of these characters together (Robin, Impulse, Superboy, Secret, Power Girl, Supergirl, Matrix, John Tensen, Justice, and why not Firestar).

It would, of course come out the same week as John Byrne’s Amalgam project making use of Doom Patrol, Fantastic Four, and She Hulk characters all trying to protect the identity of the Blonde Avenger. Aparantly, the reader that She-Hulk talks to is trying to convince the Blonde Avenger to join the Justice League since the Avengers never invted her to join. This would, naturally, involve her changing her name to Blonde Justice.

This would start a feud between David and Byrne, culminating in a Hell in the Cell match at SDCC 08 where they fight for the right to the use of the name Blonde Justice.

Maybe I should go lie down.

Theno”

I think the golden age super heroine that was later used in She Hulk was the Blonde Phantom, not the Blonde Avenger. but, a very funny idea. i would like to see it, as well as casper meets Ghost Rider.

The last of the original run of Godzilla films was Mekagojira no gyakushu AKA Terror of Mechagodzilla in 1975. The second series started with Gojira 1984, now known as The Return of Godzilla.

There’s an interesting timeline with Supergirl. By the time the last issue of Peter David’s Supergirl series was published, her replacement was already in place. Cir-El debuted in Superman the 10 Cent Adventure the same month Supergirl #80 was published.

And then Cir-El bombed and was written out of continuity so fast that before any of the characters had noticed she was gone, she’d been replaced by a new version of Kara.

Here’s a question for you I’d love to get a straight answer to, but I’m not holding my breath. Given the timings, the oddly atypical costume, and how horribly Cir-El was written, there’s a good old conspiracy theory that she was created purely as a stalking horse to deflect the ire of Supergirl fans upset by the cancellation of the Peter David series, and to make it appear that DC then bowed to fan pressure to replace the unpopular “new Supergirl” with a more traditional “Supergirl classic”.

Could there be any truth in this?

There were too many supergirls running around during that timeframe..both the ones in the PD book and the previously mentioned ones in Superman *head hurts*

Didnt Marvel have a Shogun Warriors series around the time of the Godzilla book as well?

Actually, BACK ISSUE! covered Marvel’s GODZILLA in some detail. Marvel had an initial license with Toho for 12 issues, after which they would have to go through the licensing process again. They paid a tidy sum to use Godzilla, but every time they asked about using Rodan or Mothra or any of Toho’s other creatures for a single issue story, Toho informed Marvel that they would have to pay another licensing fee for that chracter that would be the equivalent of what Marvel was already paying for using Godzilla for 12 issues! So, they came up with their own monsters for Godzilla to duke it out with.
Since it had been selling reasonably well, they went back to Toho to re-license Godzilla for a further dozen issues, only to find that Toho jacked up the fee. Although the series continued to sell at the same numbers, Marvel was now making less profit. So, as they headed towards #24, they planned on wrapping up the storylines, just in case. Sure enough, when Marvel went back to Toho, the movie studio wanted to charge an even higher licensing fee. Since this would have guaranteed that Marvel would be producing the comic at a loss, Marvel decided to drop it.
Interestingly, Walt Simonson had worked on a Rodan story for a proposed Japanese monster comic that Atlas/Seaboard was thinking of publishing at around the same time. COMIC BOOK ARTIST spent an entire issue on Atlas/Seaboard, and you can catch a glimpse of that project there.

I think those “cartoony” covers are by Rob Haynes, but not positive. Looks like samples of his amazing work- a truly under-appreciated artist. I’d be curious to see what reasons DC gives for burying his ‘Kid Amazo’ story that was so incredible?

[quote]Shortly after Peter David’s Blonde Justice ‘proposal’ became known to the public, the Superman editorial team produced a story arc that teamed Traci Thirteen, Natasha Irons, and a short-lived variant Supergirl named Cir-El into what seemed to be their response, a ‘Brunette Justice’. I don’t know if that was meant as a test or if there were plans to develop that team any further, but it sure looked to me as though they were already trying desperate tactics to make a Supergirl as successful as those final few issues of PAD’s run.[/quote]

Oh, man, that “Supergirls” arc–yeesh. I recently came across the issue with the Traci Thirteen/Girl 13 cover and cringed anew at the tagline:
“Abrakadizzle…That’s street magic, yo.”

And then there’s the fact that whoever created Cir-El apparently didn’t know how Kryptonian nomenclature works, but if I go into all the things that were wrong with the Super-titles in the late ’90s and early ’00s we’ll be here all day.

“I thought that the larger price point was due to the fact that there were more pages in the Essential Godzilla than an average essential volume. ”

At 440 pages, it’s over 100 pages SHORTER than the typical Essential.

Lawrence Fechtenberger

November 17, 2007 at 6:10 am

A stray bit of trivia:

The martial arts star Cynthia Rothrock once made a movie entitled BLONDE JUSTICE. Then, the producers discovered that there was already a pornographic movie of the same name, and they changed their title to SWORN TO JUSTICE.

[...] Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #128 [...]

Though I loved the Marvel series, my all time favourite Godzilla crossover had to be the bizarre DH one where he battled Charles Barkley!

“I’d be curious to see what reasons DC gives for burying his ‘Kid Amazo’ story that was so incredible?”–Late, I know, but just came across your comment.

Kid Amazo got released in JLA Classified this past year.

I actually have another little milestone secret. In the Superman/Blood Syndicate crossover we did in the late 90′s, , the Blood Syndicate were transformed into Harvey characters clones, Archie Comics clones and then X-men clones. Before the book went to press, DC legal killed it for fear of a lawsuit (although they were definitely satiric and spoofy). Only the X-men version remained while I redrew the Archie scene (in one hour) and made it an inferior prep school scene.

Aiya. I still have the art (and the original spoof of the Giant Sized X-Men #1 cover).

[...] Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #128 | Comics Should Be Good! @ Comic Book Resources It is a little less surprising when you take into consideration the 1994 crossover between Marvel and Archie Comics, where Archie and the Punisher met up. While hard to believe, at one point, Marvel was actually a planning a crossover between these two characters!! STATUS : True [...]

The first issue of “Godzilla” by Marvel is what got me heavily into comic books. IMO, the 60s and 70s Marvels are the greatest comics ever made. I never knew the “Godzilla” comic info stated here, thanks much, good reading.

Seeing Godzilla in Marvel Universes NYC was pretty awesome!!! But as expected even the combination of the Avengers, the Fantastic Four, and a suped up SH.E.I.L.D. Hellicarrier cannot stop Godzilla!!!

This actualy wasn’t the last we saw of gdzilla at marvel. a villian named Dr.Demonicus (who has showed up from time to time over the years, mainly as a foil for the west coast avengers)….mutated a “monster who had long been his enemy” this gave him spikes and such I suppose to make him unrecognizable from the actual Godzilla….he then fought the west coast avengers between thier original 1984 limited series and the start of thier 85 regular, in the pages of Iron Man #193 and #194

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