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CSBG Archive

Snark Free Corner for 12/10

Welcome to the latest installment of your breath of snark free air!

Enjoy!

SNARK FREE THEME TIME

Here’s a bit where I give you seven comics that fit into a theme, and you try to give me more examples that fit the theme!

This week’s theme is, “Let’s Rap With Cap…About Drugs!”

That is, a comic book that spends its time telling us how bad drugs are.

1. The first, and most famous instance, where Harry Osborn was popping pills to keep it all together. The famous “No Comic Code” issue!

2. Speedy as a drug addict was a notable example.

3. Captain America – Drug Addict?!?!?! This was a story in the early 90s called Streets of Poison, where Cap realizes that he, too, is technically a drug addict (which is a poor position, if you ask me), so he decides to purge the Super Serum from his blood.

4. Born Again, where we see how Karen Page’s drug addiction has led to her selling Matt Murdock’s identity just for some drugs! Matt, nice guy that he is, helps her work through her problems.

5. Mary Jane’s cigarette addiction. Nicotine counts, doesn’t it? In any event, after having Mary Jane taking up smoking become a subplot, there was an issue of Spider-Man where Peter gives Mary Jane a long speech about how smoking is bad. She realizes he is correct.

6. New Teen Titans and Nabisco had a couple of anti-drug giveaway comics.

7. Just last week, Fred Van Lente had a strong anti-steroids moral in his Marvel Adventures: Spider-Man.

Name me some more examples!!

COVER THEME GAME

As always, here is the game. I show three covers. They all have something in common, whether it be a character, a trait all three characters share, locale, creator, SOMEthing. And it isn’t something obvious like “They all have prices!” “They all have logos!” “They all feature a man!” etc.

In addition, please note that you must have some familiarity with comic book history to correctly guess these comics. You cannot guess the connective theme just by looking at the covers solely, you must have some knowledge beyond just the covers.

Good luck! A cool point to the first person to figure it out!

1.

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2.

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3.

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SNARK FREE CHALLENGE

Explain how Spider-Man’s organic web fluid has the same consistency and chemical properties as Spider-Man’s artificial web fluid.

THE COVER GAME

This week’s game is as follows…

Find me a cover, other than her own comic and Avengers, featuring Jessica Drew in her Spider-Woman costume!

Floating heads don’t count!!

Here is an example (which you can’t use! )….

54053_20060727194545_large.jpg

Remember, only one cover per commenter!

Good luck!

WHO IS IT?

Remember, tell me who it is and what number clue gave it away!

1. This character is currently presumed dead.
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2. This character had the same name as another superhero who proceeded him.
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3. This character took on another identity at one point, and this identity was ALSO one that another hero had used.
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4. This character has a hyphenated first name.
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5. This character was created by Denny O’Neill and Joe Quesada.

Who is it?

Well, that’s it for this installment of Snark Free Corner.

Hope you had fun!

66 Comments

Thought I had it until I reread clue #4 — Jean-Paul Valley has a hyphenated first name, not last. Thanks for the pick-up, Rob! – BC

Reread #4 again. It is a hyphenated first name that we’re looking for.

Never mind. Seems that it was caught. : o

One of my first comics was that Peter David-penned Captain America anti-drug giveaway book. And yet I’m still reading.

Let’s see, other drug stories…there was that issue of “Starman” where Jack goes to visit the JLA, and Kyle says (in a remarkably dorky fashion, really – you’re a professional, Kyle!): Hi Jack!
and Jack says: Not since Saturday.

I remember an issue of Web Of Spider-Man in which Peter had a cold and had a hard time fighting a steroid enhanced bodybuilder who was trying to impress his nephew by beating Sipdey. It was clearly an anti-steroids story without being to heavy handed about it (at least that’s how I remember it).
I’m not sure which issue it was but I’m pretty sure the enforcer who popped up in the first story arc of Alias was the steroid bully in question.

Anyway… Sorry for being so vague. It was the first Spidey comic I read as a kid, so it must’ve been good enough to hook a small tyke!

The Spider-woman challenge is quite easy once you remember her second appearance after marvel Spotlight was Marvel-Two-in One- There’s afew issues which you could use- i’ll plump with Marvel Two-In-One 32 as she’s there in the background rather than the foreground
Mental note- buy Essential Marvel Two-in-One volume 2!

I thought the MJ plot was ultimately resolved by shock treatment in the form of having her visit a rotting-away Nick Katzenberg…or however his name was spelled, the asshole?…

One of the first Superhero comics I ever owned was a 4-page free giveaway comic showing Superman shaking Nick O’Teen around by the scruff of the neck. The accompanying tv ad was awesome:

Horrible Nick O’Teen shows up and is offereing cigs to the kids in the playground – ‘Just one puff and they’ll be in my grasp!’ he asides.

Never mind that he looks horrible, sounds wheezy and phlegm-ridden and no doubt smells too, the kids are tempted and are just about to reach for the cancer-sticks when Superman flies in. Built like a brick shithouse and landing like Butterfly!

He reaches for the cigs and crushes them. “With my X-ray sight I can see the harm cigarettes can do inside your lungs!” He says while freaking everyone out with his alien eye-rays. “That’s why I NEVER say yes to a cigarette!

Speaking of addictions, how can I remember word for word and scene for scene an ad I saw more than a quarter a century ago?

They say an alcoholic never forgets his first drink.

I’m still a Superman addict. “Just one puff..” indeed!

Re: Drug use
In the early X-Factor issues, Apocalypse’s minions were addicted to a mutant who would enhance the use of their powers.
Hourman (I and II) was once retconned to be addicted to Miraclo, until they further retconned it to a psychological addiction. They they further retconned it to an addiction to superheroics.
Cloak & Dagger were nothing but a drug-use warning.
I recall Power Pack doing a drug warning issue, but my recollection is vague.
And surely Static did one as well.

VENOM! What I thought was going to be a Batman/Spiderman was one of the best drug addiction stories ever! Anyone can kick the habit if they’ve got a well stocked batcave and loyal butler.

Hourman was the other big one that came to my mind.

Also, “Never Say Yes to a Cigarette” is my favorite PSA ever.

I have a Cover Game answer! I never have Cover Game answers! Uncanny X-Men #148. Spider-Woman is (inexplicably) staying with the X-Men, so Jessica, Storm, and Kitty take in a Dazzler show, which is interrupted by the first appearance of Caliban.

I remember that Spider-Man, Storm, & Power Man anti-smoking book. We all got a copy in 4th grade, & spent a good chunk of recess deciding which super-hero would win in a fight. I suppose there was a message in there, too.

Quentin Quire’s gang became addicted to a drug that I can’t remember the name of, while Patriot from Young Avengers had trouble with Mutant Growth Hormone.

Oh, and the cover challenge: All 3 covers feature characters (Mist, Firestorm, Wonder Man) whose bodies are at least partly inorganic.

Does anyone remeber the 4-part-anti-weed comic with spider-Man facing Mysterio and two daily bugle interns especially made up for the occasion realizing their new popstar, which was making smoking weed and doing danherous suff look cool, was a fluke?

I think it was called “The Fast Lane” or something like that. There was this panel, where the male intern had just smoked weed and is driving in a horribly distorted and bad colored street. It was so bizarre that it made me doubt that the autors had ever smoked, or even seen people that smoked. I bet reading this kind of stories while being high could be quite an experience.

Cover game: Marvel Two-in-One #30 http://www.comics.org/coverview.lasso?id=31340&zoom=4

Drug comics: Representing the opposition, showing the positive side of drugs, here’s Alan Moore. http://www.comics.org/coverview.lasso?id=40733&zoom=4

Addiction stories:

1) In Heinberg’s run on Young Avengers, we learn that Patriot did not inherit his powers from his grandfather, but rather gained through an MGH addiction.

2) MGH addiction was a main plot of the Alias arc involving Spider-Woman (Mattie Franklin), who is clearly strung out throughout most of the arc.

3) In general, MGH abuse has been a running theme in Daredevil’s title in the last couple of years (esp. the “Golden Age” arc).

4) Alcohol surely counts, right? In which case, how can you not mention the famed Tony Stark-as-alcoholic plotline?

5) Hey Brian, does Elongated Man’s addiction to Gingold count as a drug addiction? :)

6) Also from the Daredevil: Born Again arc, there’s Nuke’s pill-popping (reds, blues, etc.)

There was a spiderman anti-drug giveaway comic that I remember from the very early 90′s. I remember 3 books (Issue 1 had a kid on the cover in a Edmonton Oilers jersey…issue 2 had Mysterio? Maybe?) but there could have been more in that series.

Also if I remember right, Mcfarlane was on art.

Not sure if it counts as an anti-smoking PSA but I remember an issue of X-Men during the Claremont/JRjr run (196 IIRC) where, on a quasi-stakeout, Wolverine is smoking his (then) trademark stogie and Kitty asks him about it. He explains it has no negative effects on him, because of his healing factor.

Then Kitty takes a puff, turns green and hacks and wheezes her way through a few panels, calling them disgusting and not understanding why Wolverne would want to smoke, or something to that effect.

Certainly wasn’t an attempt to ram home a message (and really, was just one completely unrelated page out of the book) but even as a kid, it struck me as an attempt to rationalize Wolverine’s smoking habit while at the same time, showing the kids at home how gross it was, and that since they don’t have mutant healing powers, they shouldn’t smoke.

I remember those Teen Titans drug specials pretty well. I was confused as a kid as to why Robin/Nightwing wasn’t in them and was instead replaced with a lookalike named “Protector” or something like that. I found out years later it was a rights issue thing…

For the drug issues-

1. I’m pretty sure every issue of INVISIBLES is an anti-drug message. “Don’t do whatever Grant Morrison does, kids.” :)

2. Abby ‘ingesting’ Swamp Thing’s tubers for their lovemaking is a kind of drug addiction too. Plus, Chester was always shown as a big pothead in the series.

3. If we’re counting nicotine, then John Constantine’s lung cancer would definitely count as an anti-smoking story…until he tricks the Devil into curing him and starts smoking again…oh well…

when exactly did spider-man’s web-fluid become organic? i’ve read every issue of jm straczynski’s run and it soesn’t happen in there…is it in avengers? WHERE? it’s like it happened off-page…

Power Pack had a rather lengthy story arc that started with one of Alex’s classmates dying from a drug overdose, and the team following the trail back to dealers with super powered teenagers protecting them. It was quite violent and dangerous compared to the enemies the Pack usually fought up to that time and I thought it illustrated well the fact that not only do drugs kill people, but people to do drugs can also kill people. (I think this was one of the first fights during which one of the Pack was seriously injured by an enemy.)

I remember that Kitty / Wolverine exchange Teebore mentioned. I think it was the moment that Kitty went from being afraid of Wolverine to respecting him. He told her not to, then watched without helping while she recovered.

The Avengers did a story arc where they held an intervention for Warbird after she went into battle while drunk.

Oh, I also have an answer for the Cover Theme Game: All the covers feature a character who has undergone an appearance change so dramatic as to be nearly unrecognizable since the cover shown.

Starman’s change from the red and green to the emo in glasses look.
Firestorm’s change into a fire elemental with the flaming shoulder pads.
Abomonation went all melty for a while. (Did he ever get better?)

Theno

Re the “Nick O’Teen” ad that Stephen Sanders mentions, it made a deep impression on British sub-culture in the late ’70s and early ’80s. It even inspired a post-punk band, The Night The Goldfish Died, to produce a 1980 record called “I Never Say Disraeli To A Cigarette”. I’ve been waiting 27 years to have a reason to impart that information.

Re addiction stories; pre-Code crime comics are full of them. The most famous examples are probably the Feldstein-Orlando story “The Monkey” in Shock SuspenStories 12, and Jack Cole’s “Murder, Morphine and Me” from True Crime Comics 2 (Laughin’ Fred Wertham’s favourite “injury to the eye motif” example). Jack Cole also inspired a 1980 post-punk record in 1980, The Fall’s ‘How I Wrote “Elastic Man”‘ (which for reasons lost to time they sing as Plastic Man). With such coincidences, you’d think Roy Thomas was plotting this comment.

A lot of the Spidey comics mentioned I’m pretty sure they were all Canadian give aways. They had to do with the Oilers, Calgary Stampede and Blue Jays and such. Somehow they connected to not doing drugs, to not cheat, not to bully and such. They were dumb but I remember as a kid reading and collecting all of them. I don’t think they count though as they aren’t canon or anything. Though I’d like to think Turbine could put up into regular continuity someday..

There was the Spider-Man/Black Cat: Evil that Men Do limited series. Most of it ended up being about heroin addicts and the horrors of heroin. The main villain was able to teleport heroin directly into your system, no needles, no pain but would purposely make people OD. I think that counts, right?

Seems like Spider-Man is the most recurring comic for drug PSAs.

Addiction – there was a Frank Miller DD story where Ben Urich spends the entire issue saying “damn cigarettes,” especially when his lack of wind stops him from escaping from Bullseye (or was it Elektra?)

Hey Brian – I hate to be a prick but “This character had the same name as another superhero who proceeded him” should be “preceded”.

fanboy d said …

when exactly did spider-man’s web-fluid become organic? i’ve read every issue of jm straczynski’s run and it soesn’t happen in there…is it in avengers? WHERE? it’s like it happened off-page…

Fanboy, it happened not during JMS’s run on Amazing, but rather during the “Disassembled” arc of Sensational Spider Man (issue #22 perhaps?). Spidey gets kissed/bitten by some insect queen which starts to turn him into a literal giant spider. When he finally reverts back to human, he finds that he now can produce organic webbing.

I’m reading through all the comments thinking “How can no one have mentioned that Aresenal used to be a drug addict?” Then I saw it up there under #2, my bad.

For the who is it- Azrael/Jean-Paul Valley, didn’t get it until #5.

If we’re counting Mary Jane’s smoking we should also bring up Iron Man’s alcoholism. And wasn’t Bane addicted to his super steriods? I remember a one shot about him kicking the habit and escaping from jail.

Grant Morrsion used the drug “KICK”-a mutant power enhancing drug throught his New X-Men run. Emma described it as making her feel violent and extremely happy, and the Redneck said it made him feel like the Incredible Hulk. Considering everyone who used it wound up doing nefarious things, I’d say that counts as an Anti-Drug message.

“I thought the MJ plot was ultimately resolved by shock treatment in the form of having her visit a rotting-away Nick Katzenberg…or however his name was spelled, the asshole?…”

Yep. He was dying of lung cancer.

I was thinking of the same Canadian comics. One issue featured the heroes from Texas like the guy that makes tornados right? The ones that are now the Texas Avengers or whatever.

Spider-Man’s organic webshooters (introduced in Spectacular Spider-Man: Disassembled)have the same composition because the spider that bit Peter also gave him the knowledge of how to make the webbing. He already had the instinct just not the ability, now he has the ability.

Ian, the thing about the spider-bite giving Peter the knowledge to make webbing is just from the 90s cartoon, and was never considered true in the comics. Comics-Peter is supposed to be just that smart, and he was constantly inventing wacky stuff in his early stories.

On the drug stories topic, there was also the whole Archie Goodwin/John Byrne run on the Wolverine solo title that revolved around a South American cocaine crop turning out to have an ancient Deviant blob-monster’s consciousness inside it. The opening of the story is a flashback to Daredevil getting the crap kicked out of him by a cokehead who got a batch of the infected blow and gained short-lived super-powers from it.

And as to the cover challenge — all of them feature characters who got the powers they display on the cover via a disintegration accident of some kind:

— The Mist’s revised origin in Sandman Mystery Theatre, which was referenced in that Starman tale, retconned his mist-powers so that he had them from the beginning thanks to his prototype disintegrator being used on him.

— Jason Rusch got the Firestorm Matrix thanks to Ronnie Raymond exploding into a ball of Firestorm energy that needed to fuse with another human being.

— In the WCA issue seen above, the Abomination is in his possessed-by-Tyrannus phase, brought about when a disembodied Tyrannus who’d been hurled into space by the Hulk encountered the atoms of the Abomination, who’d been disintegrated by MODOK for his failures in another story.

Has nobody mentioned that comic Grant Morrison wrote in which he used Magneto to demonstrate that drugs will turn you into Hitler?

Sure, it got retconned, but still.

Bishop also spent some time dealing with drugs in District X, but that was more a modern grim-n-gritty crime comic rather than being about established characters gaining substance abuse problems.

Mirror Master was established as a heroin addict in a Flash comic that I saw some scans of once.

Mirror Master was established as a heroin addict in a Flash comic that I saw some scans of once.

Coke addict, actually, in Flash v.2 #212.

There was a Daredevil/Punisher story during Frank Miller’s run featuring either crack or heroin.

SanctumSanctorumComix

December 11, 2007 at 1:40 pm

For both IAN & OMAR (and Brian, too)…

Frankly, I don’t remember much of the 90′s Spidey cartoon and didn’t know that is what they stated as how Peter was able to replicate spider-web fluid, but INDEPENDENT of that, I always thought that once the Spider bit Peter and imbued him with the INSTINCTS and ABILITIES of a spider, I always assumed that it passed on the innate know-how of how to manufacture web-fluid.

The knowledge would have bneen passed on a sub-conscious level (like how your body knows how to produce sperm or white blood cells), but Peter’s science-mindedness allowed him to “reverse-engineer” it just from thinking of how to do it.
The knowledge was passed on by the DNA of the bite, but Peter’s science mind was able to consciously extract the knowledge and implement it.

That’s just how I’ve ALWAYS thought about it (from as far back as the 1970′s when I first encountered Spidey and his origin).

That’s just me.
As far as I know it’s never been stated in the actual comics, but I don’t think that was the point of the question for this blog, just “HOW are they the same and why?”

There ya go.

;-)

~P~
P-TOR

“There was a Daredevil/Punisher story during Frank Miller’s run featuring either crack or heroin.”

PCP, actually.

The problem is that Peter’s chemical webbing really isn’t much like real spider-webbing if you think about its properties. Anyone who’s ever cleaned a house knows that spider webs don’t dissolve in an hour; and the stuff like “web-glue” and “web-balls” that he’s used for decades aren’t things you can do with actual spider webbing, which is extruded in single, long, super-tough filaments rather than as either crosshatched nets or spaghetti-looking McFarlane glop.

More to the point, Peter’s a brilliant inventor who had, even in high school, apparently self-trained in everything from electrical engineering (spider-tracers and the original Walkman-like signal detector) to chemistry (as when he develops a chemical to fuse Doc Ock’s arms together in their first battle) to physics (the anti-magnetic inverter with which he initially defeats the Vulture). He doesn’t need magic spider knowledge to make the webs based on his stated level of brilliance, and tossing in the idea that he needed “help” to make the webbing more plausible tosses out Stan Lee’s and Steve Ditko’s fairly clear desire to treat Peter as just that smart.

I’d also add the the body doesn’t “know” how to do the stuff it does, not even “subconsciously.” The cells and organs of your body, excepting the brain, are not conscious. They’re physical structures that do what they do whether you’re reading an anatomy textbook or sleeping or in a persistent vegetative state. More to the point, instinct isn’t knowledge in any real sense.

Thousands of years of recorded attempts by human beings to figure out their own instincts and the working of their parts yields some quite hilariously insane stuff — read, for example, the first major anatomical work by Galen of Perganum. Did you know that a woman’s uterus wanders around her body, hungry for love, and is an exact inversion of the male sexual organ? Galen’s subconscious and the subconsciousnesses of generation upon generation of Arab and European medical theorists prior to the late 16th century must have been on vacation.

Add in that Peter doesn’t even get spider-spinneret organs to “feel” subconsiously and the whole idea is just ludicrous. It doesn’t stand up to the most cursory logic.

I remember in my middle school nurse office there was a Powerman anti drug comic

I’m a touched surprised nobody mentioned anything about Bane overcoming the Venom drug that gave him his strength. I pretty sure there’s an issue involving that.

There’s also a couple of Justice League issues from the Bwa-ha-ha era about the Martian Manhunter’s addiction to Choco’s. Of course, both of those are more humorous than serious.

Good call on the Venom. More pertinently, perhaps, there was the original Venom story arc, in which drugs turned Batman into an ultra-violent psychopath (how could they tell? Well, he stopped wearing the Batsuit). In the end he had to break his addiction by having Alfred lock him in the Batcave for a month. During which time he grew a very impressive Mountain Man beard.

There’s the Alias storyline about Spider-Woman’s (the young one) dirtbag boyfriend who makes her keep an open wound, so he and his friends can smoke/sell her genetic tissue and get temporary superpowers.

I can’t believe that in all of this talk about anti-drug comics no one has mentioned the Falcon comics from the 1970s and 1980s (he had at least one run in Marvel Comics Presents). Buddy was a social worker and was always telling junkies to clean up their act! In one issue, he made some kid who was in training with a gang (the Pirates!) sling some rock to his parents. Those rockheads cleaned up real quick!

And of course, there is the classic Wolfpack series, about a gang of kids in 1980s NYC who are an anti-drugs gang and are always fighting with coke dealers!

http://www.comicvine.com/comic/wolfpack/4081/&i=15933&f=y

I’ve got issue #5. That Samurai coke dealer was bad ass.

Of course Omar is right…but stand aside while a master of pseudoscience, dare I say, spins his web…

Immediately after his lab accident, young Peter Parker tested a sample of his own blood to see what the spider bite had done to his biochemistry. He found his cell organelles were synthesizing an odd protein sequence (consisting of the amino acids glycine and alanine) but this protein was being broken down via hydrolysis of the peptide bonds as quickly as it was formed. It was as if his body was trying to produce its own spider silk, then immediately destroying the silk compound because his body had no use for it! (If it didn’t do the latter, the silk goo would have accumulated in his endocrine system to nasty effect.) Using his own blood sample as a model, Parker was able to reproduce this unusual protein…which when crystallized had all the strength of spider silk, but also dissolved spontaneously after a while due to the hydrolyzing component from his original sample.

Later, when Parker grew his own spinnerets, his body could actually use the spider silk protein his body had been producing all along, so he no longer needed to manufacture a synthetic copy but it was still essentially the same stuff.

Sure, RAB, but the real reason I hate the whole bit of speculation — which, thanks to that cartoon of the 1990s, is all over the place — is that it’s the very worst sort of overexplanatory, pointless fanwank. It complicates a simple story, it doesn’t do so in a way that generates stories or new ideas, and is basically a “fix” for something that wasn’t broken in the first place.

Your version doesn’t really do what the other version does, of course: the other version tries to explain how Peter could invent webbing when he was just a high-schooler and pulls in some sort of transfer of knowledge from spider to man in the name of a misguided notion of “plausibility.” In your version, he’s still got to be smarter than legions of biologists and chemists…and it’s still adds complexity to the backstory with no particular purpose.

There’s an entire canon of pre-Crisis Superman stories devoted to explaining things that need no explanation, things that clutter stories and prevent new ones rather than generating new premises and ideas. These sorts of origins, retcons, and explanations detract from rather than adding to the story engine.

Omar, don’t misunderstand my motives here. My sole purpose In crafting that pseudoscientific rigmarole is simply to follow the bidding of Cronin, who said “explain how thus-and-such” not “tell me why explaining this is a hollow and meaningless endeavor.” He asked, I answered. This sort of eager helpfulness is precisely why he invites me to all the cool parties and karaoke outings.

Unless I missed it nobody’s mentioned the Wally West Flash storyline where Vandal Savage was flooding the streets with drugs to speed everybody up–sort of a joke and a serious message all together.

That’s not bad, RAB!

And yeah, Omar, obviously none of this stuff is particularly GOOD, but since we’re now stuck with the illogical fact that his organic webshooters act JUST like his REAL webshooters, it’s fun to try to think of a way to explain how that (seemingly impossible) scenario could actually occur.

I thought the MJ plot was ultimately resolved by shock treatment in the form of having her visit a rotting-away Nick Katzenberg…or however his name was spelled, the asshole?…

You’re totally right!

I remember Peter’s big speech, but I forgot that the clincher was bringing her to see Katzenberg in the hospital.

Oh, and the cover challenge: All 3 covers feature characters (Mist, Firestorm, Wonder Man) whose bodies are at least partly inorganic

I dunno – is Kitty Pryde partly inorganic because she can become intangible? That’s basically the way that the Mist is intangible, no?

That said, it’s clever enough for a cool point!!

Hey Brian – I hate to be a prick but “This character had the same name as another superhero who proceeded him” should be “preceded”.

That’s a fine point! Nothing prick-ish about it!

And as to the cover challenge — all of them feature characters who got the powers they display on the cover via a disintegration accident of some kind:

— The Mist’s revised origin in Sandman Mystery Theatre, which was referenced in that Starman tale, retconned his mist-powers so that he had them from the beginning thanks to his prototype disintegrator being used on him.

— Jason Rusch got the Firestorm Matrix thanks to Ronnie Raymond exploding into a ball of Firestorm energy that needed to fuse with another human being.

— In the WCA issue seen above, the Abomination is in his possessed-by-Tyrannus phase, brought about when a disembodied Tyrannus who’d been hurled into space by the Hulk encountered the atoms of the Abomination, who’d been disintegrated by MODOK for his failures in another story.

I dunno if I’d count Ronnie’s death as a “disintegration accident,” per se, but fair enough, I’ll give you a cool point for it!

Starman’s change from the red and green to the emo in glasses look.
Firestorm’s change into a fire elemental with the flaming shoulder pads.
Abomonation went all melty for a while. (Did he ever get better?)

But that is Ted Knight, not Jack Knight. He kept looking that for the rest of his Starman career.

And that Firestorm cover is AFTER the fire elemental thing.

thanks David – kinda glad i missed THAT story…

Oddly, the first comic that came to mind for the Snark Free theme time was a Daredevil Annual story about drugs are good. Some kids’ Dad is a cop who is killed by drug dealers so he hates drugs. When he catches his mom shooting up he runs away. Eventually Daredevil(or was it a Matt Murdoch adventure?) discovers mom is a diabetic and we find out some drugs can be used for good.

SanctumSanctorumComix

December 12, 2007 at 6:27 am

OMAR (and RAB),

Yes, I UNDERSTAND that my whole theory is full of holes and “real science” problems.

But as RAB pointed out (and as I alluded to earlier) it doesn’t HAVE to be exact science, but more “comic book science” since it’s just a mental quizzler posed to us by Cronin.

I know all about the early works of Galen and other pioneering anatomy scholars.
The fact that they thought we were big bags of meat and air with the weirdest little doodads for innards is hilarious.
BUT, we’re not talking about that level of thought.
Admittedly, Peter Parker is a “super-genius” and that isn’t being contested.

He was able to use MODERN techniques to “reverse engineer” his webbing (and heck, even in 1960′s comics, science had some advancements that we STILL don’t have, so they get some added leeway).

And, yes, I knew going into it that the “sperm and white blood cell” analogy was a tough sell, due to the fact that we really don’t know how it’s done (consciously), but since Peter is a scientist and actually DOES know how many biological processes occur (he’s not just guessing as Galen did), he was able to accurately envision the process and replicate it due to the added insight of Spider DNA.

I DO like RAB’s little twist.
That’s kinda complex, and perhaps overly so, but within the parameters of Cronin’s game here, is a good explanation.

No one is trying to rewrite the canon.
We’re just having fun with it.

My theory was one made up by myself when I was a kid and it worked for me for years (so I never really delved too much deeper into it than that).

Peace out.
~P~
P-TOR

Thanks, Brian- the way I (mis?)understand it, Kitty turning intangible does not alter the chemical composition of her body, but the Mist turned himself into a gaseous substance not made of, um, person.

“Born Again” has been mentioned already, but I don’t recall anyone writing about Nuke’s addiction to his red, white, & blue pills. Miller = Subtle.

SanctumSanctorumComix

December 12, 2007 at 7:46 am

Oh lordie…

Lest I dip my foot one too many times into this subject’s thought-pool, I should add that I forgot to mention that since Peter Parker is a science genius, he was able to not only replicate the webbing, but to MASTER it’s composition to the point where he is able to manufacture VARIATIONS of it (ie: the 1-hour dissolving variety, the web-ball version, etc…).

THAT is where his genius really kicked in.
Not necessarily in the general manufacture of webbing (since A: he may or may not have gained instinctual knowledge through the bite – and – B: with all of modern {and comic-book version} science at his command, he could have found a way to replicate it irregardless of the bite), but that he was able to ADVANCE the technique and tweak it to serve his needs.

OK.
I’m done.

ThanX for humoring me on this.

~P~
P-TOR

Cover theme game:
All three covers involve a hero’s death at the hands of Golden Age villains
The Ted Knight Starman died in a bomb made by the Mist (as did the Mist)
Firestorm (Jason Rausch) got his powers when Shadow Thief killed Ronnie Raymond
Wonder Man was killed in his first appearance by the first Baron Zemo not giving him a serum

Too much of a stretch?

Drug comics: Representing the opposition, showing the positive side of drugs, here’s Alan Moore. http://www.comics.org/coverview.lasso?id=40733&zoom=4

Not that positive. Of the two or three people who taste the hallucinogenic tuber in that issue, not one of them survives the experience.

I’ve never read the book, but apparently Angel Love was about Cocaine.

Re: anti-drug comics;

IIRC Paul Dini wrote a story for Oni Press that involved a drug-addicted college student. Don’t recall much, except that it certainly didn’t make the drug-use glamorous. Of course the story was part of an anthology title that also featured a Bluntman and Chronic story by Kevin Smith, so maybe that wasn’t such a good idea after all…

Also, in Mark Waid’s Empire(about a world where the supervillains won), the lead villain, Golgotha(I think), kept his minions under his control with a drug called Eucharist(made from the blood of a fallen superhero).

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