web stats

CSBG Archive

Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #134

This is the one-hundred and thirty-fourth in a series of examinations of comic book urban legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous one-hundred and thirty-three. Click here for a similar archive, only arranged by subject.

Let’s begin!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Louise Simonson killed off Cypher in New Mutants because she disliked the character.

STATUS: False.

Really, I could have had as the legend “Louise Simonson killed off Cypher in New Mutants because ______,” because I have seen quite a few reasons given.

Cypher, as you may or may not know, was Doug Ramsey, a member of the New Mutants.

117829-cypher_400.jpg

His mutant power was the ability to translate any language – including computers. Nowadays, that would probably be seen as quite useful, but back in the 1980s, it was not seen as the coolest of powers.

Still, Doug was a valued member of the New Mutants basically because he was such a good, nice guy.

He was killed in New Mutants #60.

4652_20060816122627_large.jpg

After this, many a reader came up with his/her own conspiracy theory as to why Cypher was killed off.

The real reason, as it turns out, was quite simple. I will let Louise Simonson explain herself (from a post she made in the 1990s on the X-Men usenet group):

As for killing poor Cypher…I did that for several reasons. (There was a rumor at the time that he was killed because the artist hated drawing him. Another that I hated him because I had to keep twisting stories to find some instance where there was language that had to be translated.)

The real reason was…I know you’ll find this hard to believe… there was a write-in campaign from LOTS of readers who hated him and thought he was boring and wanted us to get rid of him. Preferably…they wanted him dead. We got LOTS and LOTS of these letters.

So I decided to call these readers’ bluffs and do exactly what they were asking for. (On the other hand, I never kill a character without knowing exactly how I’m going to bring them back…if I so choose. It is comic books, after all! With Doug/Cypher, the way was obvious.) Sooo…

I decided to have him die a noble death of loving sacrifice, saving his dear friend Rahne. And (surprise, surprise) we started getting LOTS of letters asking, “How could you? Doug was my favorite character?!!!” (My favorite letter… and I think one of the most honest… said, “I used to hate Doug and thought he was boring and wanted him to die, but now that he’s dead, I’ve realized he was ALWAYS MY FAVORITE CHARACTER!”) Lots of folks missed Doug … after he was gone.

Comic fans DO seem to like killing off characters, don’t they?

Thanks to Louise Simonson for clearing the Cypher rumors up.

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Originally, Superman’s powers came from the fact that Kryptonians were just super-powered, period.

STATUS: True

As you might expect, back in the Golden Age, creators did not expect that anyone would be discussing their comics seventy years after the fact, so they did not concern themselves too much with consistency.

At the same time, they also did not seem to be that worried about the particulars of how Superman’s powers worked – the fact that he was an alien, to them, was good enough.

This was evident in the first storyline of the Superman comic strip, running from January 16, 1939 to January 28, 1939, where Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster gave the first in-depth exploration of Krypton, and it might come as quite a surprise to modern readers what the people of Krypton were like.

episode1_1_edited.jpg

To wit, check out Jor-L…

Copy of episode1_1_edited.jpg

Copy (2) of episode1_1_edited1.jpg

episode1_3_edited.jpg

Yep, in the original published version of Krypton (by Superman’s creators, no less!), ALL Kryptonians had superpowers!!!

Reader T makes the useful point that this was also made mention of in Action Comics #1, as seen here:

page1_edited.jpg

but it was not until a year later, in the comic strip, when we actually saw Krypton.

Still, the planet was still about to explode, and Superman still got rocketed to Earth, only check out the different explanation for his powers…

episode1_12_edited.jpg

Copy of episode1_12_edited.jpg

Copy (2) of episode1_12_edited.jpg

Neat, huh?

Soon, the more recognizable “different gravities”/”different suns” idea was developed.

The comic strip scans are courtesy of The Speeding Bullet

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: The Champions was originally supposed to be an Iceman/Angel buddy book.

STATUS: True

Earlier this year, reader Wilbur Lunch asked me the following:

I read somewhere that CHAMPIONS was originally conceived by Tony Isabella as a “buddy” comic, featuring Angel and Iceman, but apparently the EIC at the time insisted that it was going to be a team book and therefore just added a few characters who were not appearing in AVENGERS or DEFENDERS. Not sure if it’s true, though…

The Champions of Los Angeles was a rather eclectic group, consisting of former X-Men, Angel and Iceman, as well as Hercules, Black Widow and Ghost Rider.

2232_4_01.jpg

Such an odd team would certainly lend itself to an odd origin, and that is just the case, as Tony Isabella himself elaborated upon in Back Issue #19, where he explained that yes, the Champions was originally conceived by him as a buddy book for Iceman and Angel, but he was told instead that the book was to be a team book, and not only a team book, but specifically, a team consisting of (on top of Iceman and Angel) a woman, a strong person and a hero with his/her own title at the time.

Black Widow and Hercules filled the first two roles, and despite the suggestion of Luke Cage for the fifth team member, Isabella instead went with a title he was writing at the time – Ghost Rider.

And thus, the Champions were born!

2232_4_02.jpg

And seventeen issues later, the book was dead.

Thanks to Wilbur for the question, and thanks to Back Issue magazine (which is an excellent magazine that all readers of this column would enjoy!) and Tony Isabella for the information!!

Okay, that’s it for this week!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com.

See you next week!

And Merry Christmas!!

59 Comments

I would very much like to know how many fans hated Jean Grey and wanted her out of the book prior to Uncanny X-Men 137.

Actually, the “All Kryptonians Are Superhuman” theory was even given as early as Action Comics #1.

On the reason Cypher was killed off:
Louise Simonson could tell anything she likes after the thing, but when I read her NM at the time, it seemed “obvious” that she had written all the characters in contrast to the Claremont characters. She destroyed all the team, all the characters, all the potential. She wanted to use new (her?)characters and she had to make some room.
If she was her idea or the editor idea I don’t know.
But her explanation is silly (for me…)

Cypher is the best POV character in Marvel ever, I think. Though Rick Jones and Kitty Pryde would be up there too.

I’m just more partial to Doug because I grew up relating to him. If you hung out with the New Mutants as a 10 year old, yes, you would be the guy hiding behind the rock.

He was a great character for kids.

Vestiges of the ‘from a planet of supermen’ actually still continued even after the gravity / red sun thing happened. I remember in Action Comics 500 (which I sadly no longer own so I’m going from memory) where Superman runs down the reasons why he has powers on earth and then basically says that also he comes from a planet where people are more physically advanced than earth people. Not enough to have super powers, but enough to contribute to why Superman has powers on Earth.

I’m curious to read what Louise Simonson’s solution to bringing back Doug.

I wonder if it had anything to do with him being infected with the transmode virus.

Yeah, that is most likely the case, J. Paul.

Considering that IS how he was brought back, we have to assume…

Anyone else remember Roy Thomas’ great Secret Origins series in the late ’80’s? In the first issue, featuring the GA Superman (it what was planned at the time to be his last appearance ever), Thomas uses that original continuity and shows Jor-L and Lara leaping around.

An Angel/Iceman buddy book sounds MUCH more fun & interesting than the odd mish-mosh the Champions became. Is there a more obvious example of a supergroup designed by committee?

If they ever do anything substantial with the new Earth 2 I hope they embrace the notion that everyone on Krypton already had superpowers.

I never understood why Doug was ever sent into the field. Aside from whatever combat training he got in the danger room, he had NO combat usefulness.

Before anyone jumps on it, yes I know Warlock became his manga armor & BFF so he could hold up in battle. Doesn’t that kinda make my point for me?

For that matter, why did he need to go to the X-mansion at all? Muties went there to learn to control their powers. What kind of control could have been needed as a language interpreter? Sure, it’s an “always on” power, but so what? “Help me! I can understand any form of communication. I need to learn how to be UNABLE to communicate with folks!” Dude…

Personally, I liked Doug. He would have been a great background supporting cast character. Need someone to man the monitors and NOT get whumped in combat? C’mere Ramsey. You suck in battle anyway. Need a hostage story? There he is. No, I think folks hated on him because of poor writing more than anything else.

I’d never really assumed there was any big reason behind Cypher’s death other than it being part of Simonson’s gradual whittling down of the cast (Magma and Karma had already been written out, Sunspot and Warlock were farmed out to the Fallen Angels miniseries for the better part of a year, and Magik wasn’t far behind Doug on the chopping block). All of these character departures I’ve always just chalked up to being another symptom of the fact that Simonson (while a good writer who has written many excellent comics) was an extremely poor choice to take over New Mutants. The book took a major nosedive in quality when she came aboard, with several years worth of terrible, terrible stories (including the horrible Bird Brain arc that led to Cypher’s death and the abysmal Gossamyr arc).

The Fleischer cartoons repeat the line about “race of supermen/peak of human perfection” almost verbatim. They also imply that Superman was completely raised in an orphanage.

I can’t believe the lack of love here for Simonson’s New Mutants run. I always enjoyed it, and only dropped the book when Liefeld came on board. It seemed very much in keeping with Claremont’s tone to me. The book wasn’t the striaght out wonderful that Power Pack was, but it was darn good.

Nice job as always, Brian.

Suggestion for future columns – I’ve heard that Fred Hembeck assisted Bob Layton on inking an issue of Iron Man — I think I heard it was 117.

Hembeck did an issue of Spider-Man (I think) in Assistant Editors Month.

I never read New Mutants so I don’t know anything about Cypher but I would think it could be somewhat interesting if they went the Ex Machina route and he was able to “talk” to guns and such (which doesn’t really make much sense but whatever). Then he could have jammed guns and lasers and so forth. And become mayor of NYC…

Cypher never really came back. Douglock ended up being a resurrected Warlock. Cypher’s body was still in the casket in Warlock (M-Tech) #1.

Whether or not Douglock was intended to be Doug is up in the air. It seemed that the writers when they introduced Douglock into Excalibur always hinted towards Douglock not being Doug.

As for Doug being in combat situations, at the time of his death the New Mutants had been repeatedly grounded by headmaster Magneto. The reasoning behind the grounding was because the New Mutants were not ready for combat situations, especially Doug. Magneto wanted them to learn the use of their powers in a controlled environment at the school, not in the real world where they could get hurt or killed.

Doug was at the school not to learn how to control his powers, but because it is where he felt he belonge.d When he first met the New Mutants everyone thought he was just a very smart human kid.

Schnitzy Pretzlepants

December 21, 2007 at 11:22 am

I never understood why Doug was ever sent into the field. Aside from whatever combat training he got in the danger room, he had NO combat usefulness.

Before anyone jumps on it, yes I know Warlock became his manga armor & BFF so he could hold up in battle. Doesn’t that kinda make my point for me?

“For that matter, why did he need to go to the X-mansion at all? Muties went there to learn to control their powers. What kind of control could have been needed as a language interpreter? Sure, it’s an “always on” power, but so what? “Help me! I can understand any form of communication. I need to learn how to be UNABLE to communicate with folks!” Dude…

Personally, I liked Doug. He would have been a great background supporting cast character. Need someone to man the monitors and NOT get whumped in combat? C’mere Ramsey. You suck in battle anyway. Need a hostage story? There he is. No, I think folks hated on him because of poor writing more than anything else.”

Thanks for making me laugh!

Seriously good, and funny points – I love how considered logic – even the internal logic of comics can be fodder for such humour.

It’s like that issue, years ago of Superman where he wears a hazmat type suit to clean up Kryptonite. Seriously, what type of selfish world is the DCU that the rest of the heroes wouldn’t offer to do the job for him.

No, better to let the one guy for whom the stuff is lethal clean the Kryptonite up.

I only read a handful of New Mutants comics, but I always thought Doug was cool simply for the fact his power wasn’t useful in battle. I know it’s comic books, but it always seemed a bit weird to me that 99% of mutant powers were battle realted. How useful is that, really? If I could shoot lasers out of my eyes, it would do me no good whatsoever. I’m 33, and I have yet to be in a battle. Being able to understand any language in the world, including computers? That could make you some money. I’ll take that power.

Cypher to me was a modern twist on Bouncing Boy. A young hero with a silly power that still was a part of the team.

I never associated with Bouncing Boy. But I did with Cypher. He had a cool power but it wasn’t very action packed. Still Claremont put so much character into him that I loved him.

Not too long ago I was thinking that had Cypher lived, and his power grown with him, they could spin some interesting uses for it. I think by now he’d be able to verbally “hack” the backdoor of hardwired language centers of people’s brains, and “rewrite their code” they way he could with computers. From there he could do all kinds of cool “MY NAME HAS BECOME A KILLING WORD!” stuff. Imagine a character like Black Bolt, afraid to speak not because of the physical power of his voice, but because he could damage people’s cerebral operating systems if he’s not careful.

Isn’t it a Marvel rule that every character who has even a passing romantic relationship with Kitty Pryde has to die (for a while, anyway), or at least fake his own death?

My favorite Superman origin also happened to appear in my first ever comic book, Superman #137 “The Two Faces of Superman”. The Superman origin was retold to include the Kryptonian space rocket’s collision with another alien spacecraft. The alien ship housed a duplicator ray which made exact copies of the rocket and baby Kal-El.
As the Kents discovered one ship, the other was discovered by a gangster and his moll. The Kent’s Kal-el would become Superbaby, Superboy and eventually Superman, the other Kal-el became Super-Brat, Super-Bully and finally Super-Menace. As Super-Menace comitted suicide after killing his parents at the end of the story, there was no reason to include this one-time character in continuity and it was later decided that this story would be the very first “Imaginary Story” in the Superman mythos.

jazzbo said:
“I know it’s comic books, but it always seemed a bit weird to me that 99% of mutant powers were battle realted. How useful is that, really? If I could shoot lasers out of my eyes, it would do me no good whatsoever. I’m 33, and I have yet to be in a battle. Being able to understand any language in the world, including computers? That could make you some money. I’ll take that power.”

Ha ha, good point. I think that was one angle that Morrison was trying for during his run, the idea that a “MUTATION” would be just that. That a ‘mutant’ wouldn’t always look like a GQ or Victoria’s Secret model and have some awesome offensive power. His characters were sometimes badly deformed and/or had pretty useless powers, but were no less interesting characters for it. I didn’t agree witheverything Morrison did on New X-Men, but I liked his take on a realistic approach to mutated genes.

As for Cypher- so I guess dying by write-in vote makes him Marvel’s answer to Jason Todd?!

I heard or read somewhere that Guido got the name Strong Guy because Peter David knew of the Champions story and was poking fun at it. Because, as Champions proved, every super hero team has to have a Strong Guy.

Theno

I knew that all Kryptonian’s had super powers originally, but until seeing those reprinted panels I had no idea that baby Superman was originally found by Dick Tracy.

I’m a huge fan of The Champions (especially the random, bizarre pre-Byrne issues), but I may have enjoyed an Iceman/Angel buddy book even more.

Of course, it probably wouldn’t have lasted nearly as long, since Bobby and Warren weren’t exactly top-tier characters at the time.

He did have the most useless power. I mean, yeah I can ‘translate good’ would come in handy today in like dipolomatic applications. Jobs in the government maybe, but you have to apply to something more here, so that’s why I assumed he was killed off. Yeah, he got a lot of page time in annuals looking at Psylocke before she became Asian somehow and was a good friend of Kitty Pryde. He knew Computers.

True Story, I saw the name Doug Ramsey somewhere in a data entry job. I laughed and realized I was the only one who would get the joke.

I wanted to call this guy up and say ‘hey man, you’re dead!’ and he’s still dead. Douglock doesn’t count, that’s not him. He’s dead. Dead.

BACK ISSUE magazine is, indeed, a great read! Recommendation seconded.

Champions lasted 2 1/2 years — like most books at the time, it was bi-monthly for most of its run. (almost all books started at bi-monthly then until they proved themselves — remember folks, newstand sales only, no direct market yet. it took up to 4 months to get accurate sales reports back from the newsstand distributors). books were started and died within 6-8 issues all the time back then. This one lasted 17 issues. it was a mish-mash and the characters never fit together at all, but it sold enough to stay on the schedule for over 2 years. for 76-78, that’s saying something.

I seem to remember reading an X-Men story about mutants with crappy powers – one was really good at math. I thought they were a Morlock-type group that hid out somewhere. Did I imagine that?

Re: #29
“He did have the most useless power. I mean, yeah I can ‘translate good’ would come in handy today in like dipolomatic applications. Jobs in the government maybe, but you have to apply to something more here, so that’s why I assumed he was killed off. Yeah, he got a lot of page time in annuals looking at Psylocke before she became Asian somehow and was a good friend of Kitty Pryde. He knew Computers.”

Think about this: his power logically means he would be able to read any sort of computer encryption instantly by looking at the raw data.

Still the most useless power? :D

If Cypher’s still alive in the storyline today he could have evolved into something more powerful (due to the trend with most mutants in the current continuity). Plus, the fact that computers right now have become more complex, Cypher has a lot of potential in becoming a more credible member in whatever X-Team he’ll be drafted in. In fact, I can compare him to Heroes’s Sylar.

Kylun still has the best mutant power: the power to replicate any sound exactly. Alan Davis is awesome for coming up with that one.

It’s funny but if Doug was still alive, he would no longer be nearly as worthwhile because he would be overpowered.

Dough always puzzled me. First, he was introduced as a normal, nonmutant love interest for Kitty. That alone annoyed me as a fan of Kitty+Colossus. Then it turned out he WAS a mutant, just with a seemingly useless power (for combat, anyway.) Then they bring him into the team; sure, the New Mutants were never intended to be in danger, but the fact is that they were. And finally they killed him off. Good thing I missed that, since I left the book when Sienkewiez started drawing it (could not stand his style.) That he was brought back as Douglock made sense, since he and Warlock had melded so often. OK, so his body is dead, but if his personality lived inside Warlock, then it was him, and the rest are just details. Heck, Tony Stark died, was replaced by his own young self from another reality, who then died and was recreated as an adult, yet every agrees it IS Tony Stark now. Go figure.

“I seem to remember reading an X-Men story about mutants with crappy powers – one was really good at math. I thought they were a Morlock-type group that hid out somewhere. Did I imagine that?”

There was an issue of the Dazzler/Beast miniseries “Beauty and the Beast” that included a scene set at a group home for mutants with lame powers. The only one I remember offhand (without fact-checking, mind you) was an older lady who could change the color of flowers.

(I assume when she needed a place to stay, the Island of Misfit Toys had its “No Vacancy” sign lit.)

I’m curious to know exactly whose bluff Louise Simonson thought she was calling.

With the exception of the one letter she named, did she really compare all the “Kill Doug” letters with the “How dare you kill Doug” letters to see if they were written by the same people?

Hey look, an urban legend requested by me. How cool!

As for Cypher, realistically, that guy just had “casualty” written all over him. He was bound to be killed sooner rather than later. And there was something a little queer about wearing another team member as an armor, I think. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Cypher is the New Mutants’ Aquaman. Amazingly useful power in the right situations, but those situations didn’t seem to come up. Leading to undeserved disrespect for the character.

He did beat the Magus, though.

I love whenever I’m mentioned here. It means that, for just a few hours, I can be a legend in something other than my own mind. Best holiday wishes and keep the fun stuff coming.

Re: #27
Ha! Ha! Ha! That was hilarious!

Brian from Canada

December 22, 2007 at 10:22 am

Non-powerful mutants were also being hunted in one of those early Generation X issues, IIRC. Or maybe it was one of the novels. All I remember — and this is going from memory due to the issues being packed away at the moment — is that there was a guy who was good at numbers and odds who became a successful stock broker because of his powers. But then he got killed.

I had to flip open my “X-Men Turn Thirty” special edition of Wizard magazine. I was sure Simonson specifically said Doug was killed because artists were frustrated drawing him hiding in the background.

Ends up, I was wrong. Well, half wrong:

“The artists hated Doug because he never did anything!” Simonson laughs. “He wasn’t fun to draw. He just stood around and hid behind a tree during a fight. And the only time he didn’t hide he got killed. It just goes to show! Every artist who ever did him said ‘Can’t we kill this guy?’ We would get letters from fans about how much they hated him. We never got any letters from people saying they liked him until he was dead.”

I read that to mean he was killed because of artist demand. But she also brings up the fan letters. Add her quote from this Urban Legends and it clears everything up.

I wonder if Doug had lived, whether some writer could have used him much like how Oracle is used in the DCU.

As a middle school student being dragged down by years of mandatory French classes in school I envied Doug Ramsey’s powers and was upset at his death.

Honest.

Mmm, Luke Cage and Hercules on a team together. That might have made for a few amusing arm wrestling scenes and what not. Ghost Rider just doesn’t seem to fit too well. Of course I guess the whole team was, as already mentioned, a mismash.

His mutant power was the ability to translate any language – including computers. Nowadays, that would probably be seen as quite useful, but back in the 1980s, it was not seen as the coolest of powers.

This is one of those powers which, in the context of superhero comic books, where you are supposed to have brutal throwdowns with costumed criminals each and every month, is pretty useless. But if someone had this in the real world, damn, it would be one of the most incredibly useful abilities ever.

Which is one more example of how trying to injet too many real-world sensibilities into superhero comic books just does not work.

Mmm, Luke Cage and Hercules on a team together. That might have made for a few amusing arm wrestling scenes and what not.

They would probably get into a heated argument over which one of them was the biggest playa. And the Tony Stark would show up, and they’d both realize they’d been totally outclassed :)

Astonishing X-Men, Danger Room goes bad. Doug Ramsey walks in and shuts down the Danger Room’s Operating System. End of story.

Back in the 70’s I was hanging out with Steve Grant. It was week after Christmas, so we went stereo shopping and ran into Chris Claremont. We ended up going to Claremont’s place, where he showed us (if I remember correctly) New Mutants #2 original art, which he was dialoging. He told us about this new character Doug Ramsey, who was going to save the day by reading the NORAD nuclear missle code, written in ADA, which Claremont mistakenly believed was a classified computer language (read totally top secret).

I pointed out that he didn’t need to be able to translate ADA, since Doug could just go to McGraw-Hill Scientific Bookstore in Rockefellar Center and get ADA books. Poor Doug was never the same.

And that is my contribution to comic books. Well along with yelling at Peter Parker for falling asleep in my meeting at the Bugle, and being on Nexus’s list of terrible people who need killing.

The real reason was…I know you’ll find this hard to believe… there was a write-in campaign from LOTS of readers who hated him and thought he was boring and wanted us to get rid of him. Preferably…they wanted him dead. We got LOTS and LOTS of these letters.

Yeah, I call B.S. on this one. I remember back around the time she first took over the title. I was a teenager and went to my first comic convention, where she was featured. Someone (probably Louise) had leaked that a New Mutant would die. I was a big Doug fan for reasons other people have stated–he was essentially an everyman character and it took some actual thought to work him into a storyline. He was the type of character readers could identify with. I stood in line to get her autograph and said something like, “It’s not Doug who’s going to die, is it?” She gave me this big “cat ate the canary” smile. It was clear to me at the time that it was Doug who was going to die and that it pleased her greatly. Not sure why, all these years later, that still bugs me–probably something about me being young and it being one of my first encounters with a comics pro. But it just seems like an example of taking the easy way out.

I dunno, seems to me there’s stil a good Cypher story arc out there if a good writer wanted to tell it. The potential for his powers just wasn’t recognized back in the 80s. I could see him brought back as a mysterious, behind-the-scenes type villain, for instance. His power, as someone else noted would allow him to decrypt any computer code… dude could countrol the world if he wanted to.

It seems to me that Cypher’s translation powers could have been extended to not only human language, but also, say speaking to animals, like Hawkman & Aquaman. Also with all the space-faring going on, he could communicate with Aliens, instead of everyone either speaking English automatically, or having universal translators.

It’s so strange, but is true: two or three months ago, I bought a Compilation of X-men Comics (a so-called Comic Encyclopedia of X-men)in my country, Argentina, and one of the selected stories was “Actuacion” (I don’t know how was the original english name, maybe “Acting”, the translation of “actuacion”) a really interesting story about the New Mutants facing the X-men in Mojoverse. That was my first approach to New Mutants and I was immediately attracted by the Cypher character, maybe for being almost a normal kid, shy and tender (for his love for Psylocke, I mean) and then when I found out the stupid circumstances of his dead, that his body was possessed by a crazy Warlock and the Douglock issue, I went mad. And reading the “are-just-comic-books” like response of Miss Simonson, makes me wonder how it could hurt the feelings of the kids that were identified with Cypher (I think that a lot of shy, “boring” boys read comics), that He was killed for being “boring”.
Well, and I don’t think is queer to use a partner like an armor, I use to do that sometimes… hehe

It seemed as though the Warlock M-Tech series was setting the stage for Warlock/Douglock to be transmutated from techno-blah blah to flesh and blood by Hope.

I have read Louise Simonson’s excuse for killing Cypher in several places, and it seems only half true. I am sure there were fans who didn’t like him…that doesn’t mean she had to kill him. She certainly didn’t apply that logic to Bird-Brain or Gossamyr, who fans would have liked to have seen die repeatedly.

Also, the poor writing of Doug during her tenure didn’t exactly show her as capable of writing the character. His powers had made Chris Claremont develop thought-out storylines to employ his powers. She tacked on a relationship with Rahne because she obviously needed to make his upcoming death more dramatic. Of course she missed that the whole Warlock/Cypher dynamic was loaded enough already.

So I don’t think this is really accurately labelled an Urban Legend…its not like she brought the character back for the fans who were upset!

I’m in no way questioning that the Angel/Ice Man team-up was the intent for Champions; just questioning the idea. Where have Ice Man and Angel ever been particularly close, and what in the world do they have in common, other than being X-Men? Ice Man and Beast were buddies, so that would have made sense, but Hank was with the Avengers. Unless it was going to be an odd couple book, rich self important Warren and joking, regular guy Ice Man don’t seem like they would be hanging out. Other than the fact that they were the two free rejected original X-Men.

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives