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CSBG Archive

Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #137

This is the one-hundred and thirty-seventh in a series of examinations of comic book urban legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous one-hundred and thirty-six. Click here for a similar archive, only arranged by subject.

Let’s begin!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Joe Staton once snuck a pedophile joke into an issue of Brave and the Bold.

STATUS: True.

Reader Ethan Kaye (who has a neat blog that is a lot of fun to read, and you can read it right here) wrote in with this one almost a year ago, but I was just recently able to get to the bottom of it.

1098_4_197.jpg

As Ethan mentions to me, in a 1983 issue of The Brave and the Bold (#197), Commissioner Gordon is sent a package from the Scarecrow.

B&B197page2.jpg

Quite clearly printed on the package is the word “pedophile.”

B&B197Box1.jpg

Beyond that oddness, the story was so good (it filled in the story of how Earth-2 Batman married Earth-2 Selina Kyle), it ended up in The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told!

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In that collection, DC edited out the word. But how did it get there in the first place?

To get to the bottom of it, I first contacted Alan Brennert, the great comic writer who wrote that particular issue. He told me:

I believe it was Joe Staton (or maybe George Freeman, who did the inks) who sneaked it in as a joke, but you should contact Joe or George and ask them. It sure wasn’t in the script! I was glad when it was taken out for the Greatest Batman Stories…aside from the propriety of using that word as a joke in an 80s-era comic book, it kind of distracted from the dramatic scene set-up with Gordon.

Other than this, B&B #197 is my favorite of all the comics stories I’ve done, and a large part of that, I must say, is due to the fabulous art by Joe and George. So I can forgiven them having a little fun with the title page…

Finally, thanks to Rik Offenberger at Archie Comics, I was able to get the answer from Joe Staton, and here is the lowdown:

Actually I think the label was more “PED-ophile”. Commission Gordon was holding a shoe box and at the time I thought is was funny that you might see “pedophile” as meaning “foot lover,” not a good pun, but not such a bad name for a shoe company.

Anyway, I put it in, but back then, DC had a pretty tight editorial process so stupid jokes and personal bits were normally caught and properly disposed of. Unfortunately, not in this case. My stupid joke was actually inked and even printed. Most people seemed not have even noticed it, but it looked tacky.

Later when editor Mark Waid told me that the story was going to be in a collection, I asked him to erase the label and he was happy to do so. It was my stupid joke and I’m very grateful to Mark for letting me set it right, especially since this was one of my best jobs, on one of the very best scripts that ever came to me, with one of the very best inking jobs I ever got.

Thanks for letting me clear that up.

A lot of thanks to hand out!

Thanks to Ethan for the question! Thanks to my pal H, from the aweseomrageous blog, The Comic Treadmill, for the scan of the page in question! Thanks to Rik Offenberger for getting me into contact with Joe Staton, and finally, of course, thanks to Alan Brennert and Joe Staton for their replies!

Wow, that was a lot of thanks! Heck, while we’re at it, let me thank The Grand Comic Book Database for the cover scan of Brave and the Bold #197!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Mike Wieringo’s next assignment before his death was going to be a run on the Punisher.

STATUS: False.

Reader Jonathon Ansley told me that he had heard on the Around Comics podcast that Mike Wieringo’s next assignment for Marvel before his tragic passing in 2007 was going to be working on the Punisher. The Around Comics podcast matches what Cully Hamner said in September at the Wieringo tribute at Baltimore Comic-Con. Where he stated, according to CBR writer John W. Smith:

Cully Hamner revealed one project the Marvel-exclusive Wieringo had been working on around the time of his death: an arc on “Punisher: Max.” At first Hamner had thought –like he had with Spider-Man– that Wieringo was probably not right for the series. “But looking back on it, he probably would have pulled it off,” said Hamner.

I asked Marvel about it, and Tom Brevoort explained:

No. Mike was going to be doing three issues of PUNISHER WAR JOURNAL, but after he got the first script, he discovered that he wasn’t comfortable doing it, and so turned the assignment back.

So there ya go!

For an extra treat, here is a sketch (courtesy of the Comic Art Gallery of Spider Guile) of the Punisher by the late, great Wieringo (for even more of a treat, click on the image to see Guile’s very nice inking job of the sketch).

Punisher - Ringo & Guile 72dpi_edited.jpg

Thanks to Jonathon for the question and to Jim McCann and Tom Brevoort for the answer!

EDITED TO ADD:

Cully Hamner wrote in with the following:

Just to clarify something from that CBR piece:

I don’t believe I ever said that Mike was “working on” PUNISHER when he died, as I knew he was doing a WHAT IF? In fact, he sent me some of those pages while we were on the phone for the last time. In that same conversation, he also told me that he had been *offered* a PUNISHER arc, but wasn’t sure how he felt about it. We also talked about maybe getting my studiomate Karl story to ink it, as he had some time in his schedule coming up.

I did say, though, that I thought he would have found a way to pull it off, mainly because Mike was an endlessly creative and resourceful guy.

Thanks, Cully!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Marvel cobbled together a one-page story to keep a character from belonging to Hasbro.

STATUS: True.

Reader yo go re brought this one to my attention earlier this year, and it’s an amusing tale of how to skirt a contract rule.

In the 1980s, Marvel had a deal Hasbro to produce comic books based on the Transformers television and line of toys.

Part of the deal was that any characters Marvel introduced in the Transformers comic would be owned by Hasbro, not Marvel. That was not that unusual, and really, it was not much of a problem, as the main characters in the comic book were ones that Hasbro already owned – the Transformers.

And otherwise, throwaway characters weren’t much of a loss, so it was not a big deal.

However, when the artist on the British Transformers comic, Geoff Senior, showed the book’s writer, Simon Furman, the throwaway bounty hunter for a late 80s storyline, inspiration hit Furman. The character was too interesting looking to be just a throwaway character.

Then a dilemma hit, though. Would they really want to lose such an interesting character to Hasbro?

So, instead, Marvel UK had the character appear in a one-page backcover strip on a number of their titles right before he appeared in his “first appearance” in Transformers #113.

113.jpg

In the one page strip, he fights against a character named Tex in a one-pager, “High Noon Tex,” by Furman and Bryan Hitch (Reader Lee Robson corrected my initial credit of Senior as the artist on the strip – it was a young Hitch who actually drew it).

highnoontexdh1.jpg

The character did, indeed, become a hit, and soon, he gained his own comic book title (check out the cover by Hitch).

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Thanks to yo go re for filling me in on the story! Thanks also to the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe for the picture of Tex and to the great Transformers site, Seibertron.com, for the Transformers cover! Thanks also to Lee Robson for the strip credit correction!

Okay, that’s it for this week!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com.

See you next week!

70 Comments

Haven’t we seen that last urban legend before?

Does Marvel still have the rights to Death’s Head? Because I know Ellis is fishing for a Marvel property to revamp on his board and that would make a whole lot more sense to me than him on Dani Moonstar or Stingray.

Didn’t Marvel do the same thing with Circuitbreaker, by using her in Secret Wars II? Of course I don’t think they ever used the character again outside the Transformers books but I always remembered her having a Marvel copyright instead of a Hasbro one.

Matt D, that is a great idea. So long as it is the regular old school real Death’s Head and not #2 or v3.0 or whatever that was.
I am always hoping maybe someone at Marvel might hand Ellis a folder with all those old Malibu characters sitting around in limbo. He is bound to find a workable idea or three in those. Myself, I would take a 616 upgrade on Men In Black, reconfigured as the Post Civil War/World War Hulk/Secret Invasion immigration unit of the Earth. MIB with Marvel aliens and a snarky satire on legal and illegal immigration could make for a killer non-underwear pervert Marvel book.

I remember Death’s Head, I didn’t realize there was a Transformers link though.

“I am always hoping maybe someone at Marvel might hand Ellis a folder with all those old Malibu characters sitting around in limbo. He is bound to find a workable idea or three in those…”

There are a lot of workable ideas to be found in the Ultraverse characters, but as I understand it (I believe it got covered during a “Cup a’ Joe” at a convention last year), the rights are really tangled up, so it’ll be a long time before we see those characters again – if ever.

Even before I read the details, I knew that last urban legend was going to be about Transformers. I was wrong on the character, though, as I thought it would be Circuitbreaker. Totally forgot about Death’s Head. Didn’t they do something with him a couple years back? I remember him being elected to be one of the character revamps from… was it Marvel Comics Presents? The book that launched the girl Scorpion. Was that ever published?

I dimly recall reading somewhere that the main reason Marvel isn’t using the Malibu Ultraverse characters isn’t that they consider the characters especially non-viable or anything. It’s that the characters’ creators have unusually good royalty arrangements, so it’d either be harder to turn a profit, or just be a general administrative hassle to do an Ultraverse revival. So with no widespread clamor to revive the characters and a lot of other stuff going on at Marvel, there’s no great rush to do much there….

THAT was the deal, thanks Suedenim. And M Bloom, the book was Amazing Fantasy, which apparently published a “Death’s Head 3.0″ story based on ideas from Simon Furman.

God Bless Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death%27s_Head

Gérard Morvan

January 11, 2008 at 11:28 am

Speaking of funny names, will you do, or have you already done a story about Alan Moore naming a character “Sodam Yat”? How DC could let this pass, I’ll never know.

And I would like to see more international comic book urban legends. For example, do you know the reason why the first adventure of the post-apocalyptic story Simon du Fleuve will never be published? Or that Neal Adams worked once on a french super-hero?

that pic of the punisher by weringo is awesome…

reminds us that we trully lost a treasure.

at least he gave his rendition, and boy does it ever look nice. clean, to the point. he looks tough, yet accesable.

gonna miss him even more!
(goes to reopen telios to read)

Am I exposing myself as a dunce for having no idea why “Sodam Yat” is any different from any other “alien name?” Is there an obscene hidden Britishism of some sort beyond (as noted here) “So damned yacht?”

http://mightygodking.com/index.php/2008/01/05/well-have-fun-fun-fun-till-my-daddy-takes-the-lantern-away/#comments

Warren Ellis already worked on the Ultraverse characters- he wrote Ultraforce/Avengers (drawn by George Perez!) and Ultraforce vol. 2 1-3(I think Darick Robertson drew it). He also plotted the next story arc, scripted by Ian Edgington. While not great, they were sort of a precursor to his superior Stormwatch & Authority comics, and I remember liking the book at the time.

Thanks for the reminder on Deaths Head. As a Scottish Marvel reader it was great that there were two comics that were in US size with US prices, despite being properly Marvel UK (I can’t be the only one to remember Dragon’s Claws?!?!?). The last issue of Deaths Head also had a letter from me printed, which was a huge thrill as a 13 year old. I know now that the print run was probably minimal and that there was likely only three letters sent that month, but still…. If only Marvel was like every other UK comic publisher at the time and you got a prize for a publisehed letter!!

I meant ‘published’, not ‘publisehed’!!

Damn. That Punisher image by ‘Ringo made me really want a Captain Marvel series by him.

Such a loss.

Interestingly enough, I’d heard the bit about the Ultraverse creators all having such good royalty agreements that it made their characters/works hard to use/reprint. But I’d also heard many of the Ultraverse creators making public statements that they were willing to voluntarily re-negotiate said agreements, since a smaller percentage of actual money was more to their advantage than a big percentage of nothing. Which sort of puts the ball back in Marvel’s court, but I had heard nothing since then.

I liked that title Mantra, although until very recently I had totally confused her with Ultra-girl or whatever from the New-Warriors.

I wonder if anyone knows where I could get a full fun of Mantra? Couldn’t cost me much, could it?

Suedenim # 11: Yes, there is. Think of a sexual practice that is banned in most of the USA.

The female MODOK introduced in West Coast Avengers, MODAM, was originally named SODAM. I always wanted to see her team up with Gamora.

Ah…. SOdam Yay…Sodamy. Just figured it out.

To #18: I believe Lawrence v. Texas made anti-sodomy laws illegal in the US.

Haven’t we seen that last urban legend before?

I didn’t run it before, but yo go re did bring it up before on the comments to a different piece, so that’s probably what you’re remembering.

I have that issue of Brave & the Bold. I never paid any attention to the box before.

Maybe there is an urban legend to investigated in the buyout of Malibu by Marvel. I have heard that is was done to get control of Malibu’s in-house colouring department. I’d be interested in knowing if that was true.

Regardless of the reason, it felt like Marvel had bought the company to destroy it, given they immediately cancelled titles like The Strangers and The Solution, and turned Mantra into something completely unrecognisable.

Interesting to see Alan Brennert’s name brought up, I was just rereading my old copy of Daredevil #192 written by him the other day, and wondering why I had never come across anything else by him. Wonderful character driven done-in-one piece which compares very well to the Frank Miller issues which had just ended the previous month. Kudos to you sir if you are reading this, 25 years on and your script still gave me a lump in the throat and a tear in the eyes.

Going from “Sodam Yat” to “sodomy” isn’t obvious enough to bother with. It would be like complaining that “All Star Squadron” is abbreviated “ASS.”

I don’t think Ringo would have been a good fit for a Punisher story, at least not the kind seen in MAX. Which thankfully aren’t in-continuity.

I knew Death’s Head was originally a Transformers character and I did wonder how he stuck into the main Marvel Universe afterwards. Then again, he’s also met Doctor Who, another non-Marvel property.

Speaking of Death’s Head, I’ve always wondered what the deal with Death Wreck was- especially the rumor that his creator, a female mad scientist, was secretly Reed Richard’s long lost mother. Anybody know?

This should at least help:

http://www.marvunapp.com/Appendix/deathwre.htm

http://www.marvunapp.com/Appendix/drnecker.htm

Dr. Evelyn Necker seems do be quite a bit younger than Mrs./Dr. Richards would be, however.

I’m pretty sure the Punisher title they were trying him out for is Punisher War Journal, which is written by Matt Fraction and considerably more light-hearted than MAX. Didn’t the first issues concern the death of Stilt-Man?

I’m pretty sure the Punisher title they were trying him out for is Punisher War Journal, which is written by Matt Fraction and considerably more light-hearted than MAX.

Yep. That’s what Brevoort says in the above piece.

Interesting to see Alan Brennert’s name brought up, I was just rereading my old copy of Daredevil #192 written by him the other day, and wondering why I had never come across anything else by him.

I believe he moved on to other media. I know he just came out with a novel.

hey brian, not to be nit-picky, but i find it odd YOU never typed Death’s Head’s name in the article… it doesnt appear until the cover at the end. Kind of odd he’s a pronoun or ‘bounty hunter’ the whole article.

I don’t know if this would count as an urban legend (or if maybe I just missed it somewhere), but during the publicity for 52, didn’t Dan Didio say something about the series having the appearance of a famous character that had never appeared in a DC comic?

I swear I read that somewhere, but don’t remember hearing anything about it during the series or since.

“Regardless of the reason, it felt like Marvel had bought the company to destroy it, given they immediately cancelled titles like The Strangers and The Solution, and turned Mantra into something completely unrecognisable.”

i had heard that Marvel only bought the company to have access to their superior coloring methods, or something like that.

Alan Brennert wrote a novel about 15 years ago too. I own it. He was also brought on as a producer and writer for L.A. Law in its later years and has written other television.

Regarding Sodam Yat, I never gave the name a second thought before but I guess it does sorta, kinda sounds a little like “sodomite”. But I think it’s a stretch either way.

In regards to what has said earlier about Dan DiDio, 52, and a ‘character that had never appeared in a DC comic before’…isn’t that Isis?

She had that TV show, and had a bit of a cult following, but had never appeared in an actual DC comic until 52.

Dan Didio probably meant Isis, but wasn’t aware that DC published the tie-in comic to her TV series, and that Isis made a guest appearance in one issue of Shazam!

In regards to what has said earlier about Dan DiDio, 52, and a ‘character that had never appeared in a DC comic before’…isn’t that Isis?

She had that TV show, and had a bit of a cult following, but had never appeared in an actual DC comic until 52.

…Unless you count the Isis comic from 1976-78 published by NPP, DC’s forerunner.

OT PS. I keep getting this “You can only post once every 15 seconds. Slow down cowboy” page when I try to post lately. WTF? I’m NOT double-clicking or anything.

They can’t have anti-sodomy laws in Los Angeles. If they did that, Hollywood would go out of business

As wonderful as the art would have been, the only Marvel arc I can imagine being more excruciatingly wrong than One More Day would be a Punisher series drawn by the great Mike Wieringo.

I’m glad Ringo had the good sense to turn that assignment down.

[...] Article: Something different with comics: a column that addresses comics’ urban legends. [...]

[...] Así es, la caja dice PEDOPHILE, ¿de qué se trata todo esto? Aquí está la respuesta. [...]

I’d love to see an Ultraverse revival. If anyone wants to buy a full run of any Ultraverse title, except for a few issues that are harder to get, just ask your local retailer. If he/she/it has a large backstock, you might be in luck. Also, you might be able to get almost all for a buck apiece, like I did.

They can’t have anti-sodomy laws in Los Angeles. If they did that, Hollywood would go out of business

Just a little homophoic-sounding, there.

hey brian, not to be nit-picky, but i find it odd YOU never typed Death’s Head’s name in the article… it doesnt appear until the cover at the end. Kind of odd he’s a pronoun or ‘bounty hunter’ the whole article.

I’m pretty sure he did that to build up anticipation while you were reading the article, so the cover would be more of a reveal.

“…the throwaway bounty hunter…”

Freelance peacekeeping agent.

Pays to observe protocols, yes?

Haha, good call, EvilDeathBee!

I like your explanation, Dan! :)

But yeah, puckett’s right, I just plum didn’t notice that I hadn’t mentioned the name for most of the piece.

Ah, fair enough, then.

I think the “Character that never appeared before” in 52 might have been Super Chief from about halfway through the run. Wasn’t he from an old DC cartoon?

Nah, Super Chief had, like, two appearances in 1962. :)

Regarding the Ultraverse characters, I’ve heard that discussed several times, and what I understand happened is this:

When creating the Ultravese titles, Malibu made a deal with various creators where it would retain copyright of all the characters in exchange for paying royalties to them whenever they were used. A very small amount, I hear.

Marvel did buy Malibu for both its printing system and the characters, who were surprisingly popular back then. When they did, they also bought the royalties arrangement. It didn’t stop them from publishing Ultraverse comics for a while. However they changed them so much, their appeal was lost and sales plummeted (that and the market in general was falling in the late 90′s.) So no, it isn’t a matter of entangled rights; Marvel just doesn’t want to have to pay royalties to the original creators anymore, not even very small ones.

Alan Brennert did a few comic fanzines in the mid1970s, before becoming a TV writer, where he’s spent most of his professional career. check the IMDB for the specifics

Go to Steve Englehart’s website and look up Strangers under his comics resume. He actually wrote a new Ultraverse/Strangers comic script for Marvel but so far it goes un-published. Too bad – it’s pretty good.
Alan Brennert wrote a handful of great comics:
(in no particular order)
Daredevil #192, 195 (special thanks)
Brave and Bold #s 178, 181, 182, 197
Wonder Woman #s 231 and 232 (story)
Star Trek (Marvel) #12 (plot)
Detective Comics #500 (lead Batman story)
Christmas with the Super-Heroes Special #2 (Deadman and a special pre-Crisis super casualty)
Detective Comics #600 (Batman text tribute)
Secret Origins #50 (Black Canary)
Batman: Holy Terror
Batman Gotham Knights #10 (b&w back-up)

He also has 3 or 4 novels, a couple of short story collections and he worked on such tv shows as LA Law, China Beach, CBS’ 1985 Twilight Zone and the recent revival of Outer Limits. The guy is good; really good.

Re: the Sodam Yat ongoing discussion

Just looking at it and hearing someone say it was a hidden naughtiness, my first thought was “So damn yat? What’s yat?”

On a similar note, for Brian: I seem to recall Ennis saying somewhere that Baytor (of Demon and Hitman fame) was so named because the last line of Ennis’ last Demon issue was to be “All hail our new Master, Baytor!” until the editor nixed it. True?

Re Pedo Phile… just checked my copy of The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told and, right enough, the box in Gordon’s hand is blank.

However! On the next page, the box partially appears again, and the ‘Pedo’ part of the name remains clearly visible. So DC did remove the name. But made quite a mess of it..!

Sodam Yat was an in-joke by Alan Moore meant to imply that all Daxamites were Sodomites… the Super guy who had the Power Ring. And I heard the reason Marvel bought Malibu was for their digital colouring business.

Re: Pedo joke…

The reason it doesn’t work is that the word for “foot lover” is PODOphile. The admiration of feet is called “podolatry” and people who treat feet are called “podologists”.

[...] A pedophile joke in an old The Brave and the Bold? Sure enough. Another Urban Myth revealed at CBR. [...]

Zach Adams: a Yat is a semi-derogatory/semi-self embraced term for native New Orleaneans, who have a somewhat brooklyn sounding accent. It comes from the phrase “Hey dahlin’, where y’at?” (Hey, darling, where are you at?—basicly, hello friend, how are you doing?).

Perhaps Alan Moore has a thing against New Orleaneans…or really like’s his Bourbon Street visits.

For more on Yats, visit your local library.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yat_(New_Orleans)

I didn’t run it before, but yo go re did bring it up before on the comments to a different piece, so that’s probably what you’re remembering.

Ah – That must be it.

And is sodomy really illegal in some states of America? What century are those states living in???

Reminded of this from reading today’s Pipeline at CBR:

“SPIDER-GIRL was cancelled and brought back after a fan letter from a little girl.”

After a quick search of the archives, I could not find coverage of this. Didn’t I hear that it wasn’t a little girl, but rather an adult male that happened to be a fan of Spider-Girl?

It WAS illegal up until a couple of years ago.

The Supreme Court ruled said laws unconstitutional.

I wish we had a constitution in Britain sometimes

I don’t know about this character Baytor, but there is a recent character in Star Wars comics; a Jedi Master named Soon Bayts. In other words, “Master Bayts”. And he’s actually had more than one appearance.

Just clarify something from that CBR piece:

I don’t believe I ever said that Mike was “working on” PUNISHER when he died, as I knew he was doing a WHAT IF? In fact, he sent me some of those pages while we were on the phone for the last time. In that same conversation, he also told me that he had been *offered* a PUNISHER arc, but wasn’t sure how he felt about it. We also talked about maybe getting my studiomate Karl story to ink it, as he had some time in his schedule coming up.

I did say, though, that I thought he would have found a way to pull it off, mainly because Mike was an endlessly creative and resourceful guy.

Thanks for the information, Cully. I’ll add it in!

I know this is WAY late (I’m trying to find a specific old Legend that isn’t linked from the “arranged by theme” page), but looking back at the ‘Ringo legend after the fact and thinking about the dates, I wonder if perhaps the Punisher storyline they offered him was the one with Kraven the Hunter and all the animal-themed villains. I can see both why Marvel would think that would suit his style, and why he’d be uncomfortable doing it…

ParanoidObsessive

November 21, 2008 at 9:06 am

>>> I am always hoping maybe someone at Marvel might hand Ellis a folder with all those old Malibu characters sitting around in limbo. He is bound to find a workable idea or three in those…

>>> There are a lot of workable ideas to be found in the Ultraverse characters, but as I understand it (I believe it got covered during a “Cup a’ Joe” at a convention last year), the rights are really tangled up, so it’ll be a long time before we see those characters again – if ever.

It’s worth noting that the Ultraverse characters aren’t the only Malibu characters Marvel might have access to – in theory, they should have also gained the rights to the Malibu versions of the public domain Centaur Publications characters (the Genesis line), along with any new characters created for that particular line. Not that they’d necessarily WANT to use those characters…

>>> I liked that title Mantra, although until very recently I had totally confused her with Ultra-girl or whatever from the New-Warriors.

I quite enjoyed Mantra when the book was basically a study in a male warrior forced to live in the body of a female sorceress, along with the added complication of child custody issues. After Marvel obtained the property, they just sort of turned it into a more traditional – and less interesting – book.

>>> I wonder if anyone knows where I could get a full fun of Mantra? Couldn’t cost me much, could it?

From what I’ve seen, most price guides suggest they’re only worth slightly more than cover price now ($2.50).

As for where one could get a full run… no idea. I’ve only got #1-9 myself, as post-Break-Thru is more or less when I started to lose interest in the Ultraverse.

>>> The reason it doesn’t work is that the word for “foot lover” is PODOphile. The admiration of feet is called “podolatry” and people who treat feet are called “podologists”.

“Ped” is used for “foot” as well, though, as can be seen in words like pedometer, pedestrian, and pedestal.

For that matter, the word “pedology” means either the study of child behavior or the study of soil, depending on the context.

[…] issue for years and I spotted it long ago. But I never knew the story behind it before and luckily, Comic Book Resources already got to the bottom of it. Via CBR, here is the explanation from Joe Staton […]

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