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CSBG Archive

Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #154

This is the one-hundred and fifty-fourth in a series of examinations of comic book urban legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous one-hundred and fifty-three. Click here for a similar archive, only arranged by subject.

Let’s begin!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Fans traveled to Jim Shooter’s home to convince him to return to writing the Legion

STATUS: True

Jim Shooter’s run on the Legion of Superheroes (which he began when he was 14 years old) is still an acclaimed run by fans (it was in the Top 150 Comic Book Runs, as voted on by Comics Should be Good readers), but what is especially remarkable is how much his run was loved back when it happened, and to what lengths some fans went to bring Shooter back to the book.

Shooter began his run with Adventure Comics #346, a comic he wrote and drew when he was a mere 14 years old!

By 1969, Legion lost its place in Adventure Comics (moving to backups in Action Comics, then occasional backups in Superboy – talk about a drop-off!) and Shooter was graduating high school (and most likely disenchanted with working with Mort Weisinger), so the grizzled veteran of 18 years decided to quit comics entirely.

However, Legion fandom does not go softly into that good night, which Shooter would learn later.

First off, the Legion fans founded the Legion Outpost, which was more or less directly responsible for the Legion being given a permanent spot in Superboy (and, ultimately, the entire title to themselves).

Harry Broertjes was the editor of the Legion Outpost from the second issue on, and in the Summer of 1974, he went to visit Shooter, who was living in Pittsburgh and working in advertising. Broertjes interviewed him for Legion Outpost #8, and noted that Shooter seemed interested in writing comic books again.

Some time after the interview was over, Broertjes and another Legion fan, Jay Zilber, decided to go visit Shooter again at Shooter’s home. This time, it was to convince him to try writing comics again. They eventually convinced him to give it a go, and Shooter flew to New York, and wrote his first comic in over four years, appearing in Superboy starring the Legion of Super-Heroes #209.

The rest, as they say, is history.

How different would the history of comic books have been if not for these Legion fans?

Read about the Legion Outpost in The Best of the Legion Outpost, from TwoMorrows Publishing (edited by Glen Cadigan).

You can order the book here!

Thanks so much to Keith Dallas, of the nifty Silver Age Soapbox column over at Comics Bulletin, for the information!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: A comic creator was killed returning home from signing a million dollar contract

STATUS: True

When you talk about bizarre, but true, few stories fit the bill as well as this tragic tale of a comic creator dying literally at the peak of his fortunes.

(Robert) Sidney Smith began his career as a sports cartoonist at the Chicago Examiner. He routinely featured a goat character in his cartoons, and when he moved over to the Chicago Tribune, he started a comic strip there starring a family of anthropomorphic goats called Old Doc Yak.

In 1917, Captain Joseph M. Patterson, editor and publisher of the Chicago Tribune, gave Smith what turned out to be utterly brilliant career advice. Old Doc Yak was not doing too well, so he suggested that Smith try a new comic strip, this one featuring “ordinary” people doing ordinary things.

Smith gave it a shot, and started The Gumps in 1917, which soon became one of the most popular comic strips ever, and helped build the Tribune-News syndicate.

The series, with its intricate continuity and soap opera feel, was a precursor to many other comic strips that began using the same style of storytelling (Gasoline Alley, for instance).

In 1929, Smith took a character who was more important in the early days of the strip (back when it was more of a gag-a-day, and less of a soap opera), Mary Gold, and killed her off (after dragging her illness out for quite awhile). The response was tremendous.

Here is a photo of Smith with the letters he received over her death (and this was not one of the really major characters in the comic)….

Merchandising of the strip was massive, as were other media tie-ins, such as a cartoon film serial, a radio series – the Gumps were everywhere. It was making so much money that, in 1925, Smith received an unheard of ten year, one MILLION dollar contract to do the strip, netting him $100,000 a year.

Amazingly, ten years later, Smith was able to negotiate a LARGER contract, this time for $150,000 a year.

Sadly, while driving home from the party to celebrate the signing of his contract, Smith crashed his new Rolls Royce (also, I believe, part of the contract) and died.

Talk about going from the highest of highs to the lowest of lows!!

Gus Edson took over, and while the strip lasted another two decades, it never was nearly as popular as it was before Smith’s death.

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Dick Giordano brought Steve Ditko to DC Comics

STATUS: False

A few weeks ago, I was reading a comic book messageboard, and I saw the following (I’m not going to single out the poster because the whole point of this is that it is a common mistake, so it wouldn’t make sense to make it out like “Guy X is incorrect” when a LOT of people on this topic are incorrect) post:

Things were really happening at DC in 1968, with the inclusion of Dick Giordano as editor. He brought over Denny O’Neil and Steve Ditko from Charlton, and some really good stuff was going on!

My eyes perked up, because this is a point that I see mentioned every so often when the topic of DC in the late 60s comes up, and it bears noting – Giordano did NOT bring Ditko to DC Comics, it was the other way around.

This is not to diminish the impact that Dick Giordano had on DC in the late 60s, which was considerable. Giordano is a comic book legend, and his influence was important.

However, when it comes down to “who was there first?” the answer is Ditko.

Giordano broke in at Charlton in 1966, editing a number of their titles, such as…

Judomaster…

War Attack…

Go-Go….

and Sweethearts…

Essentially, the whole line of comics.

In 1967, he notably edited the first issue of Blue Beetle, where Ditko debuted the Question.

In April of 1968, Ditko started at DC with a story in Showcase introducing the Creeper.

This issue was edited by Murray Boltinoff, not Giordano.

Once at DC, according to noted comic historian Mark Evanier (who also noted last year how often this error comes up), Ditko recommended that they hire Giordano, who started shortly after, with Aquaman #39,

and the same month, the first issue of Ditko’s Beware…the Creeper.

That same month, Ditko introduced Hawk and Dove in Showcase (Carmine Infantino edited it).

Talk about a productive few months!

Yes, Giordano did bring Charlton creators with him (most notably, Denny O’Neil), but not Ditko.

Thanks to Mark Evanier for the information!

Okay, that’s it for this week!

Thanks to the Grand Comic Book Database for this week’s covers!

While you’re here, check out the Top 100 Comic Book Runs countdown (you can follow it here)!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com.

See you next week!

54 Comments

>>Harry Broertjes was the editor of the Legion Outpost from the second issue on,

Apropos of not much, as a more or less newspaper lifer (if, that is, you exclude the last 5 1/2 years … hard for me to believe) I was a bit taken aback a year or so ago to come across a familiar name from the distant past while reading about an industry quasi-scandal of sorts concerning campaign contributions by supposedly objective journalists. Apparently, the genesis was some contribution to a GOP candidate or PAC or whatever by a Miami Herald copy editor named … Harry Broertjes. Small world.

Jesse Farrell

May 9, 2008 at 7:04 am

Did Shooter actually draw his Legion stories? I thought he layed them out and then more experienced DC artists drew the art in the comics that saw print.

Yeah, he laid them out.

fourthworlder

May 9, 2008 at 9:36 am

Shooter’s LSH was the first title I can remember buying and saving each month, my first little comic book collection. It was also the source of my first great comic book disillusionment.
I was about nine years old when it was replaced by Supergirl in Adventure Comics. With I believe that same issue the price of the comic (and all comics, obviously) went up to 15 cents.
(I remember running back outside the store to my mom waiting in the car, and telling her I needed three more pennies. And she made a face and said something like, “well, just this one time. Fifteen cents for a comic! That’s just too expensive!” I reminded her of that twenty years later when she bought me Arkham Asylum as a birthday present)
I bought the comic anyway, thinking that somehow it was a mistake and the Legion would still be, somewhere, inside. They were not.

So my world view suddenly changed.
The LSH had always, always been in Adventure Comics but NO MORE.
Comics had always, always cost twelve cents but NO MORE.

At least I knew who to blame.

And so, since then, through all the years, every time a comic or a TV show I like gets cancelled, or a band I like breaks up or a singer dies, every time prices go up, of comics, movies, gasoline, whatever, I always know, deep down in my inner nine-year-old core, who to blame.

Girlfriend broke up with me?
Job got down-sized?
War in Iraq?
Deep down I always know who’s to blame.

“Supergirl!”
(said the way Seinfeld says “Neuman!”)
The bitch did it again.

Well in all fairness I think the lesson you should have learned there is to always look beneath the covers before being suckered by a pretty face asking for your shiny pennies.

fourthworlder

May 9, 2008 at 9:57 am

And she wasn’t even pretty, not to a boy who’d spent the last three or four years imagining how I could get rid of Ultra Boy and capture Phantom Girl’s affection all to myself.

I was going to question his drawing the issues, as I had never heard that. Doing layouts would not be out of his reach. Like most in the industry, they have at least some basic artistic talent. Being a fan who would love to go professional, I wish I had even the most meager amount of artistic talent, but I don’t.

As far as Ditko and Giordano, I’ve always heard that Giordano was the one over at DC that helped to bring some of the previous Charlton creators to DC after he got there including Ditko, Aquaman writer Steve Skeates (who was hot stuff at the time), and Denny O’Neil who went on to write some of the best Batman stories ever. Was there anyone else who came over from Charlton ? Is it possible that even though Ditko’s publshed work appeared before Giordano’s that Ditko followed him to DC ? I just can’t see Ditko going first. It seems very out of character for him.

It’s Super B!tch’s fault !

I remember when comics went from a quarter to a whole 30 cents each. Outrageous !

I can’t believe they average about $ 3 each now. If I hadn’t read them religiously for the last 30+ years would I come into them at that price now ? Probably not.

Wow… I’m famous! I’m the idiot who made the stoopid comment about Dick Giordano bringing Steve Ditko over to DC in 1968, as evidenced by this link http://cbgxtra.com/default.aspx?tabid=42&view=topic&forumid=30&postid=43951 I had read that comment on a follow a couple of days later and realized I was wrong (I think I meant to type in Steve Skeates), and was hoping nobody would notice! Didn’t mean to make you wince Brian! (Memo to self: No computer access before the first cup of coffee!)

>>And she wasn’t even pretty, not to a boy who’d spent the last three or four years imagining how I could get rid of Ultra Boy and capture Phantom Girl’s affection all to myself.

As drawn by Win Mortimer or especially, 16 or so issues later, Mike Sekowsky? True. As drawn by Neal Adams (as on the ADVENTURE #381) or Curt Swan (on many subsequent covers)? Au contraire!

Huh. I didn’t realize till just now, trawling through the “Time Machine” cover galleries at Mike’s Amazing World of DC Comics, that a handful of the first DC 15-centers (ADVENTURE 381, DETECTIVE 388, ACTION 377) were cover-dated *June” 1969, My intro to the higher price came with various July issues — STRANGE ADVENTURES 219, SGT ROCK 208, probably ANTHRO 6.

Man, that was downright traumatic. I mean, I was operating on a 50-cent allowance … those 3 cents represented SIX PERCENT of my budget!

Ah, well — my beloved 80-Page Giants had been trimmed to *64*-page giants about a half-year earlier, so my childhood had already been raped.

(Of course, about 9 1/2 years alter, when the cover price went from 35 cents to 40 cents, I swore off comics for about a quarter-century. How little I knew …)

fourthworlder

May 9, 2008 at 11:09 am

Every price increase since then has been basically a revisitation of the original, deeper trauma.

And, to continue my sad tale, and to touch again the theme of re-visiting trauma, the Legion of course returned, in Superboy, three or four years later. I was by then a much older, wiser thirteen-year-old.
And I took one look at the new Dave Cockrum uniforms, particularly the formerly modest Phantom Girl’s tight new bodysuit with the cleavage and the holes cut out so bare skin showed through, and those stupid pig-tails to each side instead of the flowing raven hair, and my immediate thought was “poor Tinya, what the hell did that bitch Supergirl DO to you?!”

From the wikipedia article on Jim Shooter…

“Rather than submitting a standard script, Shooter’s early method was to actually draw out entire stories in art breakdowns, and then add the dialog. LSH artist Curt Swan was so impressed with Shooter’s sense of artistic layout and design he would often copy from the youngster’s sketches.”

If you’re interested in reading the Gumps and Old Doc Yak, they’re both at Barnacle Press…

http://www.barnaclepress.com/list.php?directory=Gumps

http://www.barnaclepress.com/list.php?directory=OldDocYak

Posted by Hondo
May 9, 2008 at 10:09 am
I was going to question his drawing the issues, as I had never heard that. Doing layouts would not be out of his reach. Like most in the industry, they have at least some basic artistic talent. Being a fan who would love to go professional, I wish I had even the most meager amount of artistic talent, but I don’t.

Actually, for “breakdowns”, you don’t really need to have very much artistic “talent”–just an ability to sketch out the basics (even as stick or block figures) so that the *real* artist can follow your story.
Of course, in the real world of comics publishing, I think most contemporary writers will admit they’re largely incapable of drawing stick figures. Many of the current writers have a strong foundation in writing screenplays or other forms of non-comic fiction so they’re able to translate that foundation into a written form of “breakdowns”.

That’s true, and that’s how I’ve largely taken it, but I’m truly shocked at how many writers I’ve found over the years are frustrated artists with a surprising amount of talent beyond stick figures. I’ve seen some pretty impressive art by Grant Morrison, Jim Shooter, and Alan Moore, all very good writers, with surprisingly decent art, though they don’t have the speed, and certainly don’t compare with the artistic professionals in the field now.

The prettiest Supergirl was drawn by Alan Lee Weiss on the cove of a Super Team Family.
See the website “Mike’s Amazing World of DC Comics for a picture.
I’m sorry, but I don’t remember the issue number, but I think it was the only one with her on the cover.
If not, it makes no difference. Weiss’ depiction of her is so pretty that she would stand out in a room full of gorgeous women, as will this cover.

Just wanted to stop bye and say how much I look forward to this column and lying in the gutters every week, more than anything else in the comic blog-news-sphere…keep up the great work, its very much appreciated.

I’d never heard that about Smith and The Gumps. Actually, the only thing I’d ever heard about The Gumps was that it was the strip Martin Landau used to assist on before he became an actor. I imagine that was during the later Edson period.

Wow, that Hawk and Dove character certainly fits Ditko’s cruel, closed-minded, aggressive, harsh objectivism to a tee. You can’t exactly mistake his work with anyone else’s, except maybe some of Frank Miller’s dumber stuff.

People speculate on why kids of my generation preferred Marvel to DC, but a big factor is that, when I started collecting in 1980, Marvel was $.50 and DC was $.60! That settled that for me.

comb & razor

May 9, 2008 at 3:59 pm

Matt Bird –

yep, that’s true… a lot of people assume that once Marvel came on the scene with their new, modern comics, that it was automatically curtains for DC. but actually, Marvel didn’t pull into a firm lead until the whole price increase fiasco.

Dang, I heard never heard that about The Gumps and (Robert) Sidney Smith. Wow ! I had never heard that Martin Landau ever had anything in the comics industry at all. Amazing !

Hey boys, I can’t believe you are complaining about having to pay three bucks for a comic! Here in Argentina we have to pay the argentinian equivalent of nine dollars to buy a marvel or Dc comic!….non a giant size, non a double issue, just a common one….
There’s always someone in a worse situation….

it is even worst in colombia!! it is pretty hard to find those suckers, and you can buy a house for that price!!

well… actually, not. but you know what i mean

I’m paying it, and in all fairness the quality is excellent, but as has been said by many others before me, it’s hard to justify the return on investment when you’re done reading the book in 10 or 15 minutes for $ 3. Compare that with a paperback, a movie, or a video game. Maybe it’s just because some of us who were paying much less back in the past seem to compare how comics have gone up far more than other items in the same time period. I can’t speak to foreign sales. I have no idea.

I read where it was mentioned that Giordano “broke in” at Charlton in 1966, but could that have been as an editor? Because he had been drawing stories for Charlton since at least the mid-1950s (in titles like
Racket Squad in Action, around the time the Code started appearing on comics covers).

Back in my day, comic books were made out of *coal*, and we liked it! But the important part is that I had an onion tied to my belt, which was the style at the time.

The owner of a shop I occasionally go to shared with me the story of when comics went from 20 to 25 cents, he refused to go along so he didn’t buy comics any more (for I don’t know how long). The specific issue which he refused to buy? Hulk 181. He still doesn’t have it.

fourthworlder

May 9, 2008 at 10:08 pm

Sorry i don’t get the coal and onion reference. Is that from some old tv show or something?

fourthworlder

May 9, 2008 at 10:18 pm

When I was little, of course, the tv show of choice was Herculoids. It was a Saturday morning cartoon made by Hanna-Barbara, who were popular at the time.
Most boys I was acquainted with back then chose Tundro as their personal favorite of the five Herculoid creatures. He was a sort of armoured rhino-dinosaur who could shoot energy bombs from a hollow horn on his nose.
Girls of my acquaintance by and large tended to be more partial to Gloop and Gleep, twin lovable blobs who could could assume all sorts of interesting shapes, while making a distinctive “nninngg-nnninnnggg” sound.
Which was the style of the time.

I was wondering about Jim Shooter’s 2nd go-round at writing LSH. He was swapping leads and back ups with Cary Bates, then he wrote a full length (17 pages at the time) encounter with Time Trapper, a real moody, intense story with a mysterious new enemy in the back ground. This enemy came to the forefront the next issue in “When Stargrave Strikes” and that issue rocked my young pre-teen comic book reading world: great art from Grell & Wiacek while Shooter ratcheted up the drama: Stargrave beats the crap out of everybody (including a full pager with Superboy literally knocked into orbit.) Then the LSH find themselves transported back to their citadel where Braniac 5 seeks to enlist the LSH to actually help Stargrave take on a larger threat. The issue ends with Brainy telling Stargrave that the LSH isn’t cooperating but “I’ll help you with your war on Mordru….father!” And then it ends. And then nothing. Levitz takes over (not the good “working with Giffen on Great Darkness” but the first not-quite as good Levitz run) but even he does not take on the Stargrave stuff except for 1 six pager (with a lame “Stargrave’s really the original Braniac android”) and then Gerry Conway wraps it up, (with Joe Staton on pencils, hardly in the Mike Grell mode), totally undermining every bit of mood and menace that Shooter had set up. (Whew!). One of the great disappointments during my time reading comics. Why did Shooter set that all up, then leave? Why did such a cool story get so botched up on the follow thru?

The coal and onion bit was inspired by Dana Carvey’s Crotchedy Old Man routine from SNL (Something like: “In my day, we didn’t have TV’s. We stared at candles for entertainment. Our eyes melted and we suffered third degree burns but WE LIKED IT! We like it fine!”)

Or maybe he was going for Abe “Grandpa” Simpson, now that I think of it.

Laying a book out involves drawing the book, right?

Would anyone contest that George Perez “drew” Avengers #32 and 33? The ones that Paul Ryan penciled and Al Vey inked (over Perez’ breakdowns). I think laying out/doing breakdowns for a comic constitutes drawing the comic.

Wow… I’m famous! I’m the idiot who made the stoopid comment about Dick Giordano bringing Steve Ditko over to DC in 1968, as evidenced by this link http://cbgxtra.com/default.aspx?tabid=42&view=topic&forumid=30&postid=43951 I had read that comment on a follow a couple of days later and realized I was wrong (I think I meant to type in Steve Skeates), and was hoping nobody would notice! Didn’t mean to make you wince Brian! (Memo to self: No computer access before the first cup of coffee!)

Ha!

Dave, my whole point of not mentioning you was because it IS such a common mistake! So no shame in it! :)

Just wanted to stop bye and say how much I look forward to this column and lying in the gutters every week, more than anything else in the comic blog-news-sphere…keep up the great work, its very much appreciated.

Why thanks!

I’d never heard that about Smith and The Gumps. Actually, the only thing I’d ever heard about The Gumps was that it was the strip Martin Landau used to assist on before he became an actor. I imagine that was during the later Edson period.

Yep, he was there under Edson.

Jesse Farrell

May 10, 2008 at 6:56 am

“Laying a book out involves drawing the book, right?”

Well, in the sense that Shooter’s drawings were probably only seen by the artist who then adapted them, like a blueprint, and they never saw print themselves, not exactly (that is, if what I’ve heard is correct). As far as I know- and again, I may be off here- the actual pencillers and inkers of Legion did not draw over Shooter’s work, just looked at it as reference. I don’t really consider that drawing the book.

Hate to nitpick, but saying Shooter drew Legion seems to be crediting him with a bit too much.

Why is Shadow Lass shooting Aquaman in that Aquaman cover?

okay I know it’s probably not Tasmia, but you have to admit it looks a lot like her

Hate to nitpick, but saying Shooter drew Legion seems to be crediting him with a bit too much

I don’t think it’s a nitpick.

I mean, I disagree, but it’s a fine criticism.

It’s funny how the creativity level was there in the 60’s. So many things that were dared….some that hit it…or some that slipped away to the corners of obsecurity…but still an amazing time.

Ah…i remember my first great price increase (funny how we all seem to recall them!)…DC went from 40 cents to 45 cents…and then later to 55 and 60 cents. But when they did that, they actually gave you more stories with great backups, at least for awhile. My favorite was the “Whatever happened to…” segments in DC Comics Presents. Introduced me to alot of great obscure and long-lost DC characters like Rex the Wonder Dog, Sargon the Sorcerer, Crimson Avenger, etc. Now price increases without added content. Sheesh, now i sound like the crotchity old man…..

Brian wrote:
>Shooter began his run with Adventure Comics #346, a comic he wrote and drew when he was a mere 14 years old!

So start the urban legends running now: if Brian doesn’t modify this, he’s going to have to write up a response in a couple years to the urban legend that runs “Curt Swan was a fake name used by DC to hide that the teenage Jim Shooter was both writing and drawing the Legion of Super-Heroes”. Or some other equally wrong info caused by this very article saying that Shooter was the artist on the feature.

Please save yourself the troubles later on! Shooter had a role in the art, but he didn’t “draw” the comic in the sense we usually think of with comics.

Shooter drew the issue.

Swan drew the issue, AS WELL.

But Shooter drew the issue.

Did Jim Shooter’s drawing pencil touch the art boards that Swan and the inker used, which the printing plates were then created from? If not, then he didn’t actually draw the issue, even if his breakdowns were explicitly lightboxed.

As I said, if you don’t change the text above, you’re just setting up a new urban legend that will need to be debunked. (Probably too late by now, actually.) Then again, this is the Legion’s 50th Anniversary year, so having a few more Legion Legends probably isn’t a bad thing, and to be sure, many aspects of Shooter’s wunderkind status bear repeating and confirming and clarifying. (And fortunately, he’s still around to help with that!)

(Mmm, speaking of which, have you done one on the idea that Ferro Lad was supposed to be a black Legionnaire, years before Tyroc?)

It is not an “urban legend,” it’s simply a difference of opinions on what it means for someone to “draw” a comic. I am saying a guy drawing a comic constitutes him drawing a comic. You are arguing that a guy drawing a comic has to involve his drawings being published. We differ on this.

And yep, I featured the Ferro Lad one!

Do you have any basis for the “disenchanted with working with Mort Weisinger” comment? I hadn’t heard there was any animosity between Shooter and Weisinger. And why no mention of his current, brilliant run on the title?

As for the Gumps, I’ve been aware of them for years, ever since I read a collection of books in my high school (pre-Internet) days. A sad, but fascinating story. And a wonderful strip that any fan of good storytelling should seek out.

Do you have any basis for the “disenchanted with working with Mort Weisinger” comment? I hadn’t heard there was any animosity between Shooter and Weisinger.

No, I just threw that in there to test you. ;) Seriously, it’s in the aforementioned Legion Outpost interview I mentioned.

And why no mention of his current, brilliant run on the title?

It’s a conspiracy, I say! :) Again, seriously, didn’t seem relevant. Unless, of course, some Legion fans went by Paul Levitz’s house to get Shooter the most recent gig! :) By the by, the most recent Lying in the Gutters suggests that Shooter is off the title, which would be a shame.

As for the Gumps, I’ve been aware of them for years, ever since I read a collection of books in my high school (pre-Internet) days. A sad, but fascinating story. And a wonderful strip that any fan of good storytelling should seek out.

Most definitely.

Crazy Diamond

May 13, 2008 at 3:20 pm

Folks, Shelly Moldoff is credited as the interior artist for Adventure #346. Curt Swan did the second part of the story in the subsequent issue.

Either in Outpost or DC’s Wide World of Comics, Shooter revealed the sketch that he made when creating Validus, a design that Curt Swan followed with the introduction of the character.

As to Jim Shooter’s ability to draw, he’s given at least pencil credits for Marvel’s “Super-Villian Team-Up” #9. There, he was basically trying to keep Marvel going and seemed to need to have a story drawn but with no artist available.

Talk about comic book price shock — remember going to the newstand on June 1, 1970, with thirty cents to buy two comics, only to discover that DC Comics were now twenty-five cents (with reprint material) and having to decide whether to buy the first issue of “The Forever People” or another DC comic…

>You are arguing that a guy drawing a comic has to involve his drawings being published.

Yeah, I would say that’s the very definition of “drawing the comic”.

Maybe I drew that issue, too. My drawings weren’t published either.

The comics industry today has some reasonably good mechanisms for crediting the work that different creators do on a comic. You can see credits for “Layouts” and “Breakdowns” and “Finishes”, among other terms. Every reference I’ve seen to Shooter’s art being involved in these Legion stories falls under Layouts or Breakdowns. Your use of “drew” is ambiguous at best, misleading at worst. And the very purpose of these columns is to avoid ambiguity and misleading, is it not?

Did you get Forever People or the other comic?
I MUST KNOW!

P.S:- Comics cost about $9 – $10 here in Australia too.

“Sorry i don’t get the coal and onion reference”

The onion reference is definitely Grandpa (Abe) Simpson while the coal would be any “Back in my day” reference common to many folks. Dana Carvey would be one but I was just last night reading a Terry Pratchett book detailing how two mayflies (who only live 24 hours) were talking about how “you never see the same quality of daylight that you used to see back in the their younger hours”. So it’s a pretty common device.

[…] featured Sidney Smith’s The Gumps in the column before (right here!). The Gumps was one of the first comic strips that was dedicated to “ordinary” folk, […]

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