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Comics Should Be Good Top 50 Countdown! – #43

Here’s #43! Click here for the master list!

Enjoy!

Showcase #43

While I certainly believe that the first comic book appearance of James Bond is a notable comic book, I’d have to admit that I would like to see a different comic here, if possible, but I can’t think of one.

Fantastic Four #43 led into the wedding of Reed and Sue, but really, it wasn’t all that notable.

Swamp Thing #43, Doom Patrol #43, Amazing Spider-Man #43, Hellblazer #43, Supreme #43, Tales of the Teen Titans #43, Sandman #43 – all of them fine issues, but nothing of particular note to them.

So is there another issue that I am missing – or is the first comic book appearance (in America, at least – I think period, but definitely America) of James Bond notable enough to stay in the spot?

34 Comments

Was Supreme the first Alan Moore issue? That was the only one I really *knew* but I’m not sure it’s as notable to others.

Will Sandman ever make the cut?

Pickings are slim. 52 #43 and the memorably gristly death of Osiris? Cerebus #43 was the election returns issue, a particularly funny bit from High Society but the one right after that is decidedly more memorable as the ‘Wuffa-wuffa-wuffa-Wham!’ issue and 44’s already behind us. Waid’s JLA run starts with 43, if you don’t count the parts that were concurrent with Morrison’s. Green Lantern #43 was the debut of Major Disaster. Bond may have to be it…

Random Stranger

July 21, 2008 at 5:01 pm

I think there’s only two issues of Sandman where that particular issue stands out from the whole and one has already passed. I’ll bet money on #8 being Sandman.

Yeah, #43 is a surprisingly tough one. There’s quite a few “good” books at #43 but I can’t come up with a single stand out one.

Avengers #43 – featuring the Red Guardian – was pretty nifty.

There’s a very strong competitor for #8 (Showcase), though. Sandman might not make it at all, especially considering that Gaiman got in with Miracleman

JLA (first series) was the first appearance of The Shaggy Man, a villain the JLA couldn’t defeat – they had to get him fighting something else and shipped him off.

Justice League of America #43 is the debut of the original Royal Flush Gang. X-Men #43 is Professor X’s funeral and the first X-Men chapter of a several issue crossover with the Avengers. Legionnaires #43 was the debut of several reboot versions of older characters, including Shadow Lass, Polar Boy, Princess Projectra, Night Girl, and Arm-Fall-Off Boy. That’s all I’ve got.

Cancel – that was 45 (so notable I remebered it wrong!)

Random Stranger

July 21, 2008 at 5:53 pm

“There’s a very strong competitor for #8 (Showcase), though. Sandman might not make it at all, especially considering that Gaiman got in with Miracleman”

First Captain Cold versus first Death and one of the two issues I’d consider the best of Gaiman’s comic work? It’s not even a contest in my eyes but we’ll have to see what Cronin selects.

Arm-Fall-Off-Boy is a joke, right? I know some of the Legion had strange powers, but that seems a bit extreme.

“There’s a very strong competitor for #8 (Showcase), though. Sandman might not make it at all, especially considering that Gaiman got in with Miracleman”

I think you mean All Star Comics 8 (first Wonder Woman), rather than Showcase 8.

I like the Bond pick.

What I like about the list overall is that it samples from a great variety of subjects and eras. This is another example.

I’ve got two words regarding #8, “one punch”.

Arm Fall-Off Boy started as a joke, but ended up being too good to let go of. Don’t get the LSH fans started. Remember that Matter-Eater Lad has a major role in LSH history.

And don’t get me started on where the upside-down rocket ship came from…

Except I’m a moron and that was #5. Nevermind.

Arn Fall Off Boy was good, but Estimate Lad (Boy) takes the prize in my book. In my secret identity I work for an inventory service, so Estimate Lad is too priceless for me NOT to love.

Slim pickings indeed. X-Men #43 was the funeral of Professor X. It set the tone for many later super-funerals with the X-Men attending in full costume. Still, the real milestone was Xaviers ‘death’ in the previous issue.

West Coast Avengers 43 was John Byrne’s second issue, and revealed at the end that the Vision had been taken apart and mindwiped, effectively ending the Vision/Scarlet Witch marriage. One could argue that any and all Avengers books since this issue have been dealing with the ramifications of that marriage ending.

It is also the issue where Byrne appeared to postulate that the Vision didn’t have a penis.

Perfectly fine pick for #43.

Since you brought up #8 … I can see the fumes coming out of Brian’s ears as he chooses between Wonder Woman (All-Star Comics) and Death (Sandman). I strongly suspect Death will sneak in under the “issue everybody remembers” criteria … “everybody” being those who were reading comics at the time.

Just want to throw out there Marvel Mystery Comics #8 — the first Sub-Mariner/Human Torch battle. Yes, I’ve been bookmarking Overstreet …

I have to agree with whoever mentioned 52 #43 and the death of Osiris. I was just a baby comics nerd at the time, and that issue was the first time a comic panel ever made my jaw drop. Great stuff.

Interesting — I was unaware that Bond had ever appeared in comic books. I guess it doesn’t surprise me much either way. Dunno how memorable it is, but notable, sure, I guess.

The 52 suggestion is intriguing. I was no fan of Young Nastyman Black Adam Jr. Osiris or his death, but hooboy was it memorable.

And I say this as a big fan of Arm-Fall-Off Boy.

Oh, also . . .

I think you mean All Star Comics 8 (first Wonder Woman), rather than Showcase 8.

Thok, are you suggesting Wonder Woman’s debut is more notable than Captain Cold’s? C’mon man, his name is Snart!

“I have to agree with whoever mentioned 52 #43 and the death of Osiris. I was just a baby comics nerd at the time, and that issue was the first time a comic panel ever made my jaw drop. Great stuff.”

I was quite the opposite: a rabid, out-of-control comics nerd, reading it at the shop I worked at. It still had the same effect. Bond gets the win here, but 52 #43 is an issue that, to this day, I tell people they need to read 52 just for that one scene.

How did we get this far down the list without a mention of Quasar #43? Have we had a death in the family?

Crossovers may Promise to have ramifications, but they often don’t. Not so in Quasar #43, where the dangling plotlines of two different crossovers intersect! An evil dupe of Marvel Boy (the ’50s hero who originally had the Quantum bands) (who was created to fight Quasar in an Infinity Gauntlet crossover) goes into the White Room to officially kill the nullfiied Quasar (who nullified himself in the Infinity War), but gets defeated. Which lets Quasar back into the land of the living again!

Hey, I don’t hear cheering that Quasar’s resurrected again.

I like that Bond’s hood/mask looks like a giant marshmallow welded to his shoulders.

Also, question for Cronin et al: How come the comic Bond looks nothing like Sean Connery? Considering that the cover promotes Dr. No as a new movie, I wonder why they didn’t use Connery’s looks to drum up interest in the film. Would Connery not let them use his face or was it a decision by DC or Fleming?

Also: is this the first-ever movie adaptation for a comic? If not, anyone know what is?

To be more accurate, I meant to say: Is Showcase #43 the first-ever comic adaptation for a movie?

Oops, somehow I gave Flash two first appearances when I did my scan-through of Showcase. But Wonder Woman is also extremely strong competition too…

Flash is relevant to the conversation, though – just not his first appearance.

#8 should be either All-Star Comics or COIE #8 (death of Barry Allen, symbolic end of the Silver age, one of the most famous covers in comics history, etc.).

All Star Comics takes it in my book, but they’re both worthy choices. Sandman is kind of close, but not up against the sheer history at work in those other two.

#8 should be Secret Wars surely?
The black costume, leading to the creation of Venom, who I would hazard a guess is a more popular comic character than Wonder Woman and Death combined. (Popular amongst idiots maybe but popular nonetheless)

Hey, if we’re considering toy tie-in comics like Secret Wars, Crystal: Crystal Warrior #8 had a cover image that was later swiped by both Danzig and Samhain.

And Micronauts #8 guest-starred Captain Universe!

“The black costume, leading to the creation of Venom, who I would hazard a guess is a more popular comic character than Wonder Woman and Death combined.”

Um… no.

Wonder Woman = Legitimate cultural icon, surpassed only by Batman, Superman, and Spider-Man.

Venom = “That guy in the Spider-man movie that wasn’t as good as the other two…?” Being popular amongst the limited constiuency of comics readers doesn’t really count here, or else Giant Size X-Men #1 would be in that first slot instead of Action Comics, since that (re-)launched the most lucrative franchise in comics.

Seriously, go out on a street corner with a picture of each, and if anyone DOESN’T properly identify Wonder Woman it’d be surprising, whereas Venom will get a lot of quizzical looks at best. Or, the best example of notoriety: the “mom test.” Your mother knows who Wonder Woman is, but she sure as heck hasn’t heard of Venom.

Howdy! This is my first comment here so I just wanted to give a quick shout out and say I really enjoy reading through your blog posts. Can you recommend any other blogs/websites/forums that cover the same subjects? Thank you!

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