web stats

CSBG Archive

Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #167

This is the one-hundred and sixty-seventh in a series of examinations of comic book urban legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous one-hundred and sixty-six. Click here for a similar archive, only arranged by subject.

Let’s begin!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: An Uncle Sam comic book featuring Pearl Harbor being bombed was released…in November of 1941!!

STATUS: True

Reader John Trumbull suggested this one a couple of weeks ago.

Astonishingly, in National Comics #18, which was a Quality Comic starring Uncle Sam, the main story involved the bombing of Pearl Harbor!

And the release date of the comic was November of 1941!!!!

The story was written by Gil Fox, with artwork by Lou Fine.

The big difference between this comic and actual events is that in this comic, it was GERMANY who attacks Pearl Harbor.

Click on the page to enlarge!

The bombing attack was actually a ruse to lure the United States Navy away from the Eastern Seabord, where Germany attacks – with Maine being their first target.

Ultimately, Uncle Sam and his sidekick, Buddy, help the residents of Maine drive off the German invaders, with an able assist from none other than the ghost of John Paul Jones (not the one from Led Zeppelin)!!!

As amazing as it sounds at first, the idea of Pearl Harbor being attacked was not exactly the most original idea – it was the home of the United States’ Pacific Fleet, so it was a natural location for an attack.

But still, for it to be released just a MONTH before it was actually attacked?

That really IS amazing.

Thanks so much to John Trumbull for making me hip to the info!

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Mike Grell’s wife ghost-wrote a number of issues of Warlord for him.

STATUS: True

Reader Jim asked the other week:

Did Mike Grell actually write all of the Warlord run where he is credited as writer? I remember a fabulous story arc, actually I don’t remember it that well, something about a double for Travis and lots of palace intrigue: but I really loved it. And it really stood out as being an atypical Warlord story. And somewhere I heard that Grell had been sick at the time and getting help writing the book – maybe from his wife or something?

You’re BASICALLY right, Jim, in that yes, most of the writing on Warlord from #53 to 71 (Early 1982 to Mid-1983) was secretly done by Grell’s then wife, Sharon Grell (nee Wright).

However, it was not a case of Grell being sick.

In an interview with Philip Schweier, Grell elaborated on the story:

Schweier: I understand a portion of the original run of The Warlord was ghost-written by your wife at the time.Certainly writing and drawing a monthly title can be a challenge, but how did this particular arrangement evolve?

Grell: I was otherwise occupied with the Tarzan comic strip, Starslayer and creating Jon Sable. Something had to give and Sharon Wright just happened to be an enormously talented writer who thoroughly understood the character (something ensuing writers seemed to lack) and told a great story. I learned a lot from her. With editorial consent and copperation we slipped Sharon in as ghostwriter without so much as a hiccup in sales. That made it possible to reveal the secret.

Pretty neat, huh?

And Mike’s right, the stories were quite consistent, quality-wise.

I believe Wright also wrote some Maggie the Cat stories, as well.

Thanks to Jim for the question, Philip Schweier and Mike Grell for the information, and Andrew Collins, because he answered Jim’s question before I could! :)

COMIC URBAN LEGEND: A Marvel artist tried to sneak a sexuality reference into an Excalibur cover.

STATUS: False

Reader R. Lewis wrote in the other day to ask about an issue of Warren Ellis’ Excalibur, where we see an alternate future, a la Days of Future Past, specifically what Britain would be like during Days of Future Past.

Wolfsbane, as you can see, like the others, is much different from her past self.

Well, R. Lewis wanted to know if they were trying to tell us something about Wolfsbane via how her name was cropped in the cover.

It is cropped to say “LFSBAN,” which is not too far off, visually, from the word “lesbian.”

So, was there some secret message in the cover?

I figured it unlikely, but can’t hurt to ask, so I checked with cover artist Casey Jones (check out his website here), and here is what he had to say:

Unfortunately, the answer is no. I wish there was something juicy here, but I had no intention of hiding a secret message in the way I cropped “Wolfsbane” on the cover. The reader is just reading too much into that one. And… I always thought Rahne’s sexuality was pretty firmly established… I seem to remember her having a crush on Doug Ramsey back in the day… and it seems like there were some good stories that Peter David and Quesada did in X-Factor that touched on it, too.

There ya go!

Thanks to R. Lewis for the question and thanks to Casey Jones for the reply!

Okay, that’s it for this week!

Thanks to the Grand Comic Book Database for this week’s covers!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com.

See you next week!

85 Comments

The editors at Quality Comics were even closer to the bullseye with Smash Comics #21 (April 1941).

The Ray tale in the issue begins: “Trouble in the Orient… United States possessions have been molested by mysterious raids… Happy Terrill goes on the story.”

And in the climax of that tale: “The Mongol planes are soon roaring over Hawaii… Up from Pearl Harbor swoop the fighting planes of the U.S. Navy.”

‘Mongol’ is nonsense of course, but the Japanese were then classified as part of the ‘Mongoloid race’.

WOW! The artist for the Uncle Sam story just isn’t typical of what you expect from the Golden Age. He looks more in place with the 1981 than 1941. From just these couple of panels, it look slike some pretty good stuff.

Lou Fine was an amazing artist.

R. J. Sterling

August 8, 2008 at 6:16 am

Well, that’s why Lou Fine was one of the greats.

Agreed, that’s some gorgeous artwork for any time period, let alone 1941.

Although for all the heat we give Ed Benes… that’s a pretty gratuitous ass-shot on the cover, no? :)

DC really needs to publish archive editions of all those great Quality Comics (since I assume they own them). I mean, this is Eisner and Fine we’re talking about! How can they not treat these guys to Archive quality books?

If anything though, it seems like DC is moving away from their whole Archives publishing model… which is a damn shame to those of us who’ve bought many already.

R. J. Sterling

August 8, 2008 at 6:37 am

I think having a ghostwriter is garbage. If the nominal writer isn’t able to do the work, he and the publisher ought to admit it and credit the actual writer.

Pedro Bouça

August 8, 2008 at 6:50 am

Let me just say that Quality Comics was deserving of its name…

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

Uncle Sam (the superhero) was created by Will Eisner? I didn’t know that. I wonder how he felt about the way the character has been used in recent times…

And yeah, that Lou Fine art is surprisingly good!

About The Warlord, I remember enjoying this series despite the fact I don’t generally enjoy its genre. I guess it was because of the quality art and writing. As for why not give Grell’s wife credit, perhaps they feared that people would go, “Wait, this isn’t Mike? Screw it, then!” We fans can be SO fickle.

The only rumor I found lame is the Wolfsbane one. It’s the kind of thing you think about for a second, maybe. Then you read the story, see no evidence of lesbianism, and just forget about it. Not as good as the other two Legends.

Still, pretty good CBULR this week!

While the rest of the art is gorgeous, yes, I really find Uncle Sam’s sidekick, Buddy, really freaky…

He looks EVIL sitting on his shoulders…

As for the ghostwriting… No-one noticed. Which basically says that she did a damn-fine job! “No hiccups in sales” meant they could reveal that she wrote, and say – “See, she was so good you thought it was Mike!”

It’s much worse when someone is sneaked in to help, but messes up so much that the named writer loses fans…

avengers63, I always thought that Lou Fine was a direct influence on Berni Wrightson; look at the linework and shading on the characters’ muscles and clothing.

Fine and Mac Raboy (of Captain Marvel, Jr. fame) were amazing artists, and completely atypical for their era!

I always really liked Casey Jones’s run on Excalibur. I always felt it was a pity that he never really got much credit for it since he was technically just the fill-in for Carlos Pacheco (even if he ended up “filling in” for several months in a row while Pacheco was shipped off to do guest runs on books with better sales).

Just a bit off-topic, but…

Anyone know if DC plans on putting out any Warlord Showcases, especially since Grell is doing a new series?

I have a lot of holes in my collection, and I’m debating either to track them down or, well, “wait for the trade.”

I know that there is an issue with DC’s post-1976 reprints, but considering Grell is doing some work for the company I’d figure they’d iron those issues out promptly…

Craig, Lou Fine might have had an even more direct influence on Neal Adams as both worked for the Johnstone Cushing agency.

And Hunter (Pedro Bouça) is absolutely correct, Quality put its contemporaries at DC and Marvel to shame. Sadly, almost none of it is available in the Archives series, barring Eisner’s Spirit (with quite a bit of the World War II-era work done by Fine) and some magnificent early work by Reed Crandall in the Blackhawk strip.

Hey, cool — you used my legend! Great job with the research, Brian! After just reading about the Uncle Sam story in an old issue of The Amazing World of DC Comics, it’s cool to see bits from the actual story. I wonder if Bluto from Animal House read this comic as a kid:

“Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?”

“The Germans?”

“Forget it, he’s rolling.”

R. J. Sterling

August 8, 2008 at 8:20 am

I also had the Grant-Morrison-for-Mark-Millar ghosting in mind when I made that remark. It’s the same as cheating in school, and it’s being done to get fans’ money. Ghostwriting or ghost art, as in ‘The Spirit’, is cheating. Not that anyone paid extra for a newspaper containing a strip with ghosted art.

That’s odd, I had a comment about how Golden Age art isn’t the pile of crap that most people think it is, but it never appeared. Was it all the links?

Wow ! Never had heard that Uncle Sam story. Too cool !

Grell’s wife writing those Warlord stories is a new one on me too. I wonder now that Grell’s overseeing the next Warlord if she’ll be working with him on it.

In addition to the Spirit archives, there are also 8 volumes of archives for Quality’s “Plastic Man”, most of them with art and story by the great Jack Cole.

R. J. Sterling

August 8, 2008 at 9:18 am

Maybe she could even get credit this time if she did.

Hey Brian, how about explaining the exact reasoning behind why all the DC Characters printed under Vertigo couldn’t cross back into DC?

Didn’t Animal Man become a Vertigo comic?

Lou Fine. Yes. His Black Condor art really did make me believe a man could fly.

People in general have no idea how much of what they read is not written by the person whose name is credited, both in comics and otherwise.

Squasha: The reasoning is that editorial doesn’t want the more “adult” Vertigo characters mingling with the “teen-friendly” mainstream DCU. If there aren’t any future plans for characters in the Vertigo line, they will generally be released back into the DCU (examples include Animal Man, Uncle Sam, Red Bee)

Swamp Thing, as a cornerstone of the Vertigo “style”, will probably never been heard from again in the DCU.

As for Mike Grell, he always seems like an egotistical jackass in interviews, so I’m sure his Ex-Wife would probably not want to associate with him again.

My comment that never appeared, sans links:
I really wish people who are basically saying “I can’t believe how good that golden age art is! Weren’t all Golden Age artists besides Will Eisner basically cavemen scratching out crude drawings that happened to sell amazingly well?” would go read a couple of issues of Alter Ego or some of AC Comic’s Golden Age reprints.

The reason the golden age art you know of looks bad is that whoever reproduced it didn’t have access to the original art or didn’t care enough to do a good job. Marvel routinely uses color photocopies in its high end reprints, and it’s not like they were published on the highest quality paper to begin with, of course they’ll llok like crap.

Hey Brian! How about an Urban Legend about how all Golden Age comics being too ugly to read?

Let me throw in some more praise for the art on that Uncle Sam story. Damn nice stuff.

To be fair, Marvel at the time had few really good artists. Jack Kirby was still far from being The King. Carl Burgos was pretty bad. Now, Bill Everett was good, but a lot of his work at the time was done in substandard conditions.

Quality had Lou Fine, Reed Crandall, Jack Cole, Will Eisner and some very talented others. No contest here!

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

Maybe we need a couple of editions of this column devoted to possible versus actual ghostwriting and ghost art.

Other notable Golden Age artists:

Alex Toth got his start in the Golden Age (and it looked pretty good), Sheldon Moldoff & Dick Sprang did some great work on Batman. Simon & Kirby produced some of the most popular art of the period (although I prefer Silver Age Kirby). Joe Kubert, Carmine Infantino, and Gil Kane were prolific in the Golden Age, although they became much stronger artists in the ’50s & ’60s.

Oh, and Henry Peters on Wonder Woman: bizarre, but compelling.

Carl Barks and C.C. Beck weren’t too shabby, either.

Wow, there are people reading this site that assume that all Golden Age art was bad?? There’s a reason it’s called the Golden Age!

Several websites are devoted to reprinting Golden Age art at its best. If you were surprised at the quality of that story, please please please google “goldenagecomicbookstories” and “pappysgoldenage” both of which are on blogspot. (I tried to include the links, but my comment got deleted)

It’s worthwhile to spend several hours perusing the archives of both sites. Boy, are you guys in for a pleasant surprise!

The first page of that Uncle Sam story says that it was written by Will Eisner not Gil Fox. What gives?

He ran the studio, so he took the credit?

…And just in case nobody noticed, that flying vehicle on the “Journey Back” cover is Grell’s interpretation of the Aquashuttle from the Star Trek animated series. Grell’s was an avid Trek fan back then, and between him and the late, great Dave Cockrum, wound up moving the Legion from “bottles & fins” to ships that *looked* like starships(*).

(*) For all his ability to draw as an artist God, the one shortcoming that Curt Swan had involved drawing spaceships. The only one he could ever do that looked believable was Kal-El’s rocket!

Matt Baker shouldn’t go unmentioned when it comes to great Golden Age artists either.

RJ

(just teasin’) … we should ban the bible then, eh? if god herself didn’t pen those words, why shouldn’t we give peterpauljohnluke the credit? (just kidding)

i think ghost writers are a reality and, maybe, a necessity of our industrial culture. the most fun comes when we discover, years later, who actually did the work.

one day, mrs. shakespeare will be avenged, believe me!

cheers,
rio

“(just teasin’) … we should ban the bible then, eh? if god herself didn’t pen those words, why shouldn’t we give peterpauljohnluke the credit? (just kidding)”

That’s actually a great suggestion. People should remember those are the words of quite a few people, collected and sorted by many more other folks. It’s not an absolute book of one law. It’s a collection of interpretations.

johnson kibble

August 8, 2008 at 2:26 pm

I see god, he laughs at me

i just looooooove this site.
i had hear the pearl harbor story before.
there’s a story in x-factor or excalabor that has the twin towers buring down, that came out before the event

Moronia, the ficitonal country from the first Shield/Wizard meeting, attacked Pearl Harbor. The Wizard predicted this in a solo story of his published earlier.

avenging son: it was X-Force, but it lacks as strong a connection since it was only one tower, and it was done years ahead of time…

Black Tom Cassidy detonated a bomb in the Twin Towers in X-Force #3, which was famous at the time for crossing over with McFarlane’s Spider-Man. This was back in the days when McFarlane and Liefeld were BFF. It is interesting to note that this story occurred two years before the original World Trade Center bombing.

The Golden Age gave us Alex Raymond, Winsor McCay, George Herrimann, Hal Foster, Joe Kubert, not to mention that guy whose name we actually use in an award for artistic excellence in comics… So no one should ever believe the artistic standards of that time were poor. In fact I believe the genius/hack ratio back then was even more balanced than today.

“The reasoning is that editorial doesn’t want the more “adult” Vertigo characters mingling with the “teen-friendly” mainstream DCU.”–It’s a really sad attitude, and it’s part of what’s keeping superhero comics from being truly acceptable as literature. As long as the literati of our medium refuse to acknowledge the superhero genre that spawned and facilitated them (and in the case of Vertigo, STILL is what makes them possible), the genre will continue to be seen as a bastard red-headed stepchild.

“Moronia, the ficitonal country from the first Shield/Wizard meeting, attacked Pearl Harbor.”–Moronia, land of the morons?

The X-Force thing happened in Spider-man, too. It was McFarlanes last Spider-man issue and featured the Juggernaught taking out one of the towers I believe. It wasn’t too clear what exactly he was destroying. It was confusing, but I believe that’s what happened.

I’m fairly certain, Juggernaught isn’t an agent of Al Queda, that would be silly. That’s like being attacked by Japan and going ot war with Germany! D’oh!:)

there’s an issue of Uncanny X-Men (181 i think) where Rachel and Magma are hanging out at the Statue of Liberty and Rachel is remembering how the Twin Towers were destroyed in her timeline. I always thought that was kinda weird, considering when the comic came out it woulda been right on track for when the Twin Towers really were destroyed. that’s kinda the same as this Pearl Harbor business, just 20 some years later from the publishing date, not a month….

No one remembers just after Worlds At War came out from DC when Supes had a black “S” shield on his chest and two towers were shown crumbling in the first few pages of the same issue under attack and it came out like within a week of 9/11 ? I remember buying it and being freaked out by it. Too weird kinda like when JFK was assassinated and the Superman / JFK issue came out just before it happened.

there’s an issue of Uncanny X-Men (181 i think) where Rachel and Magma are hanging out at the Statue of Liberty and Rachel is remembering how the Twin Towers were destroyed in her timeline. I always thought that was kinda weird, considering when the comic came out it woulda been right on track for when the Twin Towers really were destroyed.

That was issue #189, and it came out in 1985. I’m not sure I remember how far in the “future” her “past” was supposed to be, but I’m guessing it would have been a bit more than 16 years.

Thanks for the mention, Brian. I’ve been a pretty big fan of Grell’s for about 20 years or so now, and I remembered reading his explanation of the Warlord writing events from an interview some years back. Surprised the heck out of me at the time because I remember reading those comics in order and never saw a discernible change in writing styles during the ‘hand off’ of writing chores. And sadly, Grell may seem overprotective of his ‘baby’ by criticizing subsequent writers, but in my opinion he’s right in that none of them ever really seemed to write the character the same way he and Sharon did.

Felipe
August 8, 2008 at 6:23 pm
The Golden Age gave us Alex Raymond, Winsor McCay, George Herrimann, Hal Foster, Joe Kubert, not to mention that guy whose name we actually use in an award for artistic excellence in comics… So no one should ever believe the artistic standards of that time were poor. In fact I believe the genius/hack ratio back then was even more balanced than today.

Actually, McCay and Herriman preceded the “Golden Age”. Herriman’s “Krazy Kat” debuted in 1913, and McCay’s “Little Nemo” debuted in 1905 (and ended in 1914) and neither man’s career. While Herriman was still drawing “Krazy Kat” until his death in 1944, that was largely all he produced during the Golden Age (no matter when it’s defined); he’d pretty much quit drawing his other strips by 1932, choosing to continue only with “Krazy”. As to McCay, he’d largely given up drawing comic strips by 1914 (when “Little Nemo” ended) to focus on film animation (and his best work was mostly completed by the early 1920s); McCay died in 1934 (which is genuinely regarded as just before the official “Golden Age of Comics”). Raymond’s career spanned the Golden Age, but he began “Flash Gordon” in 1934 (just prior to the “Golden Age”).
Also, aside from Kubert, the names you mention aren’t really associated with comic BOOKS, but, rather comic STRIPS, widely viewed as a completely different form. While the earliest comic books were largely collections of comic strips (until around 1935) and most comic book artists started off doing strips (frequently as “ghost artists”), the big-name strip artists rarely did comic BOOK work (the reason being, they were signed by newspaper syndicates which had the exclusive rights to the artists and their works).
As to the “genius/hack ratio” being more balanced, sorry, but nope. No matter the period of history, the genius/hack ratio has pretty much stayed at the same level.
One should also remember that a number of artists only became genuinely appreciated years after their works were commonly seen (and some of the highly popular artists of yesteryear have faded into near obscurity now).

What did Grell mean by ‘That made it possible to reveal the secret.’ – did he fess up re: Sharon prior to this column?

As for ghost writing, were Roger Stern’s Legion issues actually written by his wife, Carmela Merlo – she had some kind of ‘thanks’ credit.

I seem to recall Diana, Princess of Wales, died 31 August 1997. I remember this coming out at the same time:

http://www.comics.org/coverview.lasso?id=60841&zoom=4

“I always really liked Casey Jones’s run on Excalibur. I always felt it was a pity that he never really got much credit for it since he was technically just the fill-in for Carlos Pacheco (even if he ended up “filling in” for several months in a row while Pacheco was shipped off to do guest runs on books with better sales).”

Honestly, at times I felt Casey was the ‘real’ artist, and Pacheo was the ‘fill-in’ artist.

Is the character of Max Mercury based on the Quicksilver on the cover of National Comics #18?

Same guy, yeah. He also went by Windrunner and Whip Whirlwind.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Mercury

“One should also remember that a number of artists only became genuinely appreciated years after their works were commonly seen (and some of the highly popular artists of yesteryear have faded into near obscurity now).”

The industry has always been at the mercy of the fans, to a large extent. It amuses me to see whole runs of ‘hot’ books sitting untouched in back-issue bins a few years later because everyone has moved on to ‘the next best thing’. I wonder what the industry would be like if the majority of fans realized that, instead of buying into the hype and purchasing a lot of lesser-ranked series when they come out, they could probably wait a year or two and get the same titles for half the price or less. Then, when the publishers realize the hype isn’t helping, maybe they would focus more on delivering quality product and spend less time shellacking crap…

Anyway, I would argue that each era produces stand-out artists simply because their work is so different than whatever else is out there. When most younger readers think “Golden Age” (and I include myself in this group,) we think of the reprinted material showing the origins of Superman or Batman, or maybe some of the old Justice Society of America or Wonder Woman material. But, because our expectations in regards to artwork have been influenced by the new standards of art that has come later, we feel the older work in general has a lesser quality.

It is by happenstance, like this column, for example, where we see Golden Age artwork that is comparable to our internalized standards, and it becomes revelatory in nature. So, while I had heard the name Lou Fine before, until this week, in my laziness and ignorance, never really cared to pursue his work, thinking it was probably similar in nature to the work I mentioned earlier. BUT, upon seeing what he produced in the small snipped of art in this column, my interest in his work has now jumped a HUGE amount.

On the other hand, I know everyone has their own opinion about what makes good art. One of the posters mentioned Dick Sprang as doing ‘great’ art on Batman, and it jarred me, because I’m not a big fan of the ‘square-jaw’ Batman. Again, my perceptions of ‘great art’ have been influenced by artists like Neal Adams, I find it hard to comprehend how those growing up under the influence of Sprang artwork could have enjoyed the stories. Again, because I have been bombarded with a lot of different images by many different artists, I see a totally different version of Batman in my mind’s eye, and he’s nothing like the caricature created in the Golden Age, but obviously Bob Kane liked Sprang’s work enough to keep him on the artistic chores.

And while I believe there are some artists who establish the ‘definitive’ look for a certain character, I found it very interesting to read that Frank Miller was ‘savaged’ by both Neal Adams (twice) and Joe Orlando when he tried to break into the comic book industry.

[…] Pretty interesting history, check it out. […]

Is no one else hugely impressed by a 10 (?) year old Buddy, who can handle a large bore machine gun and mow down the advancing Nazi horde with the ease of a sidekick twice his age?
I was.
Also, Uncle Sam should wear socks.

Another Golden Age great I hear a lot of the older artists talk about in interviews but he doesn’t get the recognition he deserves is Mort Meskin. It’s hard to describe but to me it’s almost a supple Kirby. Does that make sense ?

Mac Raboy did the definitive Captain Marvel Jr. and really knocked it out of the park with a great use of light and shadow similar to Alex Raymond.

Here is a link to one of Meskin’s Golden Age tales: http://www.meskin.net/action90pg1.html

And this offers a look at the work of his contemporary George Roussos: http://www.meskin.net/roussos/airwave.html

I can’t say for certain, but I believe Roy Thomas paid homage to that Uncle Sam story in ALL-STAR SQUADRON #31-15. In it, he detailed Sam’s account of thwarting a Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour, but on a parallel Earth (later revealed as Earth X), with a different set of Freedom Fighters.

Damn I miss ALL-STAR SQUADRON.

Funny that eerie coincidence came up this week, since I was just telling someone else earlier about that Uncanny X-Men #189 thing. Here’s the panel in question:

Thank god this column came up on the top of the page. I’ve missed the last dozen or so after the site’s confusing re-design. Who let this mess through?

Possible legends
Nick Fury Empyre has a Saddam Hussein analog attacking cities by crashing airplanes-published in 2000.

Did Dick Giordiano coin the phrase “action hero”?

Yes, George Roussos was excellent too.

According to wikipedia….

“Several stories in the 1970s featured Catwoman committing murder, something that neither the Earth-One nor Earth-Two versions of her would ever do; this version of Catwoman was assigned to the alternate world of Earth-B, an alternate Earth that included stories that couldn’t be considered canonical on Earth-One or Earth-Two.”

Since wikipedia isn’t always accurate, I am curious to see more on this whole “Catwoman kills” thing.

Hey Edda, which comic was that?

Nice legends, as always. Good work. Peace.

It was not a comic, but a novel by Will Murray with Nick Fury. Quorak serves as the Iraq analog, with references to Hydra supporting this country during a Gulf War.

Good god, Excalibur. After the crap going in New X-Isles you’d think someone would blow up this franchise. But no. Marvel is too sympathetic to Alzheimers infected Brits.

I’m fairly certain, Juggernaught isn’t an agent of Al Queda, that would be silly. That’s like being attacked by Japan and going ot war with Germany! D’oh!:)

Or being attacked by an Arabian terrorist and going to war with Iraq!

Or being attacked by an Arabian terrorist and going to war with Iraq!

Well, Iraq *is* an Arab nation.

Dragging this back to comics, Quality Comics — which is where this column began — had a sympathetic character named ‘Abdul the Arab’, introduced in Smash Comics #1.

Thank god this column came up on the top of the page. I’ve missed the last dozen or so after the site’s confusing re-design. Who let this mess through?

I’m sorry, RobotBacon, I don’t exactly understand the complaint. This column wasn’t showing up where?

I’m confused too. It’s always shown up in the “Suddenly…” section and the “Meanwhile…” section for me, though a bit later than in the CSBG sidebar. (This week, I don’t think it showed up in “Suddenly…” until Friday afternoon.)

Ajit,

“Well, Iraq *is* an Arab nation.

Dragging this back to comics, Quality Comics — which is where this column began — had a sympathetic character named ‘Abdul the Arab’, introduced in Smash Comics #1.”

That’s implying ALL Arab nations are the same… Like going to War with Germany, because an Italian attacked you (well , they’re both European!)

I think what J to the AAP meant was Osama bin Laden is from Saudi Arabia (originally) and is therefore an Arabian terrorist (though most would prefer the term Saudi, just to be clear) and not an Iraqi terrorist…

Being attacked by Japan and declaring war on Germany isn’t as stupid as it sounds… By this point, World War II had already been raging for about two years, and Germany, Japan and Italy were supporting each other (they were “the Axis”-against the rest o the world-“the Allies”)

I’m confused too. It’s always shown up in the “Suddenly…” section and the “Meanwhile…” section for me, though a bit later than in the CSBG sidebar. (This week, I don’t think it showed up in “Suddenly…” until Friday afternoon.)

Aha, I gotcha.

So you guys are just getting here from CBR’s front page?

That makes sense.

So yeah, during July, one of the weeks, the column wasn’t linked on CBR’s front page at all due to a comic convention that week (WonderCon, I believe), and then another week, it was linked to during San Diego ComicCon, so it fairly quickly fell off the front page due to other news stories pouring in from San Diego ComicCon.

Sorry about the inconvenience!

Best thing I can say is to bookmark the category “Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed” http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/category/comic-book-urban-legends-revealed/

That way you’ll always see the most current column!

I suppose we can’t have a precognitive comics conversation without mentioning John Byrne.

The following is quoted from my Psychology textbook (My Psychology textbook!):

“This has been the experience of comics writer John Byrne. Six months after his Spider-Man story about a New York blackout appeared, New York suffered its massive blackout. A subsequent Spider-Man storyline involved a major earthquake in Japan “and again,” he recalls, “the real thing happened in the month the issue hit the stands.” Later, when working on a Superman comic book, he “had the Man of Steel fly to the rescue when disaster beset the NASA space shuttle. The Challenger tragedy happened almost immediately thereafter” (with time for the issue to be redrawn.) “Most recently, and [most chillingly], came when I was writing and drawing Wonder Woman and did a story in which the title character was killed as a prelude to her becoming a goddess.” The issue cover “was done as a newspaper front page, with the headline ‘Princess Diana Dies.’ That issue went on sale on a Thursday. The following Saturday…I don’t have to tell you, do I?””

I loved that Psych class.

“That’s like being attacked by Japan and going ot war with Germany! D’oh!:)”–You seem to be making an odd point, there, Tex. Wanna elaborate?

I think what J to the AAP meant was Osama bin Laden is from Saudi Arabia (originally) and is therefore an Arabian terrorist (though most would prefer the term Saudi, just to be clear) and not an Iraqi terrorist

Yes, I guessed that is what was meant, but what was said was “Arabian” — which can mean everyone from Morocco to Iraq.

Being attacked by Japan and declaring war on Germany isn’t as stupid as it sounds…

For the record, the United States did not declare war on Germany, it was Hitler that declared war on the United States. FDR specifically turned down requests to ask Congress for a declaration of war on Germany alongside Japan.

Sorry for the very delayed response, I just saw this.

Ajit,

Sorry, wasn’t meant to be having a go at you… I’d just had a really bad day at work…

Your response is interesting though…

So, the USA only actually declared war on Japan? Germany declared war on the USA? What happened with Italy?

That is a genuine question by the way, not snark… We didn’t cover that much US history in my school…

So, the USA only actually declared war on Japan? Germany declared war on the USA? What happened with Italy?

The sequence is:

December 7: Pearl Harbor + attacks on British and American possessions in Asia

December 8: U.S. Congress declares war on Japan as does British government (British Cabinet didn’t require Parliament’s approval)

December 11: Germany and Italy declare war on United States (both are already at war with Britain)

December 11: Senate and House formally approve state of war with Germany following news from Europe

Hitler was in such a hurry to get his declaration in first that he apparently ordered his chargé d’affaires in Washington to stay away from the State Department.

The declarations were a formality; actual fighting between the U.S. and Germany had begun before Pearl Harbor, when a German U-Boat torpedoed an American destroyer, the Reuben James.

Thanks Ajit!

As far as Pearl Harbor attacks in books, I remember reading a novel by Jack London that had a scene in it where the Germans attacked Pearl Harbor to draw the US into a war. I remember that the book was written way before the actual attack, but I can’t remember the title of the novel or find it via Google. Searching “Jack London Pearl Harbor” and so on gets too many hits on real events and people.

Anyone remember this? Sounds similar to the story in the comics.

Jeff L.

Some other legends
Max Allan Collins predicts Traci Lords/US vs. X-Citement Video
Milton Canniff predicts Patty Hearst

ParanoidObsessive

November 22, 2008 at 4:09 am

>>> The following is quoted from my Psychology textbook (My Psychology textbook!):

I hope that chapter was about Apophenia or Confirmation Bias, and quite rightly pointed out the fact that we notice moments of synchronicity while forgetting all the moments that DON’T mean anything. :-)

It’s like, in a business that produces hundreds of issues in any given month, and often draws its story ideas from current events, it’s almost inevitable that SOME stories are going to mesh with real events. And then, after the fact, we’ll notice, remember, and find meaning in the few issues/events that mesh, while ignoring the thousands of other issues/events that don’t mesh at all.

ParanoidObsessive

November 22, 2008 at 4:11 am

…and, of course, after writing all that, I open up the next installment of CBUL and find Brian has more or less addressed the issue himself, along with a Byrne post that basically says the same thing I just wrote.

Damn you, Cronin – you have won THIS round, but I shall have my revenge! ~shakes fist~

You make the point that it was Germany and not Japan that attacked Pearl Harbor. But Gil Fox got one thing right on the money. Look at the attack on Guam in the center right panel. That really did happen, within hours of Pearl Harbor and by the Japanese. The People of Guam suffered under Japanese rule for almost 3 years.

Written from Guam by a former high school teacher of Guam’s history.

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives