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Final Crisis #3 Review

The first part of Final Crisis comes to an end, and it does so in a most unconventional manner, as has been the case for the entirety of this series, really. Like the rest of this series, unconventional is tantamount to awesome, as this end of Act I is one of the most effectively foreboding comics I have read in recent memory.

There are a couple of very specific things that Grant Morrison is doing that I find really appealing here.

1. He is taking the “big players” off of the board, with Batman captured, Green Lantern arrested, Wonder Woman under enemy control and Superman dealing with Lois’ injuries (and now, being sent on a mission to possibly help save the day).

2. He is trying to tell the story in an almost Pointillism fashion, as Morrison gives us a little bit of info here, a little bit of info here, a panel here, a panel there, and it is all designed to be combined in our mind to paint the larger picture, and it really delivers a unique reading experience.

The book has a real dire, personal feel to it, which is ably conveyed by artist JG Jones.

Remember in Crisis on Infinite Earths, when the heroes were all gathered together? Even though the situation was dire then, the gathering was almost cheerful (at least as drawn by Perez). Here, the gathering of heroes (via a superhero “draft” run by Alan Scott) is a good deal more subdued, and while all their costumes remain colorful, the dire mood is conveyed a lot better – yes, Alan might have his superhero army, but they are up against likely insurmountable odds.

There’s a great bit with the lame Japanese heroes trying to show off their worth to Sonny Sumo and Mister Miracle. The redemption of these joke characters into true heroes is going to be really fun (unless they all die, of course ;)).

What else? The Flash stuff is fun. The Question stuff was fun. The Tawky Tawny stuff was fun.

I’m still not a fan of Dark Mary Marvel, but at least Morrison seems to be playing up that this is not a voluntary thing – the thing that bugged me was Mary VOLUNTARILY becoming Dark Mary Marvel. Her being controlled by an Evil God (possibly Lashina, if you go by the hair) is a lot better of a situation.

Nazi Supergirl getting thrown to seemingly her death? Totally awesome.

The Monitor’s adjustment to Earth? Hilarious.

Sending the anti-life equation via the internet wasn’t SUPER awesome, but it was still a pretty clever idea – but really, the ending made up for any slight cheesiness of the whole internet thing, as the Flashes have gone two weeks into the future and meet the evil that has conquered Earth, and it is gruesome (that has got to be Krypto that Wonder Woman is riding, right?).

This sets up an exciting two months before #4, as we see Superman’s journey and some other cool stuff, and we come back in time for Morrison’s other tie-in mini-series, showing some of the handful of free humans.

What a wild ride, and the most amazing thing about it is that Morrison does it without really any bombast – it’s the quietest wild ride you’ll ever see, and yet it is that quietness that makes it all the more ominous and frightening.

We’ve reached the middle of the story, and evil has won!

I can’t wait until we see what happens next!

Recommended.

83 Comments

I just read this. I am honestly very suprised that you liked it. I thought it was a mess. Morrison at his worst plus the DCU at its most confusing and joyless era ever is a bad combination. Whoever this series is for, it’s not me.

Tom Fitzpatrick

August 7, 2008 at 5:20 am

Evil has won!!!!
Yaaaaay!!!!!
Down with the good guys!!!!!

I can’t wait to read it.

I personally this issue was a step up from the previous two. The story is starting to come together more and plot threads that were laid earlier are starting to pick up. Super Young Team is my favourite part of it yet, mainly because of the oh-so-fancy costumes and the attitude towards super-heroism; I can’t wait to see what Most Excellent Super Bat’s power is….

I haven’t read #3 yet, but I plan to read it tonight. But, I think the series has been a complete mess and not at all a worthy successor to the previous DC Crisis titles. I can’t say I’m surprised, though, as I’m not a fan of Grant Morrison at all. While he is constanting praised as a genius; I just don’t see it. His early Animal Man stuff was good, the first few issues of his Doom Patrol were good and there have been some various stories that I’ve found good, but overall; I am just not impressed at all. His X-Men was horrendous and got me to finally drop X-Men for good after having read it for over 20 years, I don’t enjoy All-Star Superman at all and I don’t like his current Batman run either. I’ll be happy when he gets out of the DC Universe and goes someplace that I don’t care about.

I am honestly very suprised that you liked it.

You must be new here. ;)

As someone who really liked Issue 1 and loved Issue 2, I found this one to be a bit disappointing. It seemed to run through its plot in a fairly obvious and exposition-filled way without the flair and menace of the first two issues. There was certainly nothing as weird and great as the Anthro-Metron scene or the introduction of the Super Young Team that kicked them off. But the Human Flame accusing Libra of coming across ‘kinda gay’ was hilarious.

If you thought any previous work with “Crisis” in the title wasn’t complete crap, I’m not surprised you don’t like Morrison.

I enjoyed the first two, but I’m not sure about this one. Unless I missed it being resolved somewhere, last time I saw Frankenstein he was under the control of that blue kid in Seven Soldiers – how did he escape, anyone?

Wasn’t keen on the whole “just emailed to every email address on the planet” thing, either. Generally I cringe when comics attempt to use the net in their stories, because it always comes over as if the person writing it doesn’t actually know how the net works in the slightest (“quick, we have to shut down the net!” – even if I suspend my disbelief enough to accept people flying and shooting lasers at each other, playing fast and loose with the nuts & bolts mechanics of “how stuff works” with regards technology makes it all seem a little slapdash). Like that bit in Final Crisis where Batman tells someone to “upload every virus on earth into brother eye” – are we to assume Brother Eye was running Windows? Meh, should have just waited a week or two, he’d have blue screened anyway ;)

I mean, I know its not exactly crucial to the overall story or whatever, but…..those things niggle me in a way I probably can’t explain very well. I dunno, they make a big deal (and a fairly convincing one, at that) of how all these people, characters and magic can function in a plausible manner, but screw up the “normal stuff” that gets explained alongside it. It’s weird.

Finally, the Supergirl cover puzzled me – I was expecting, y’know, some contribution to the story, instead of seeing her in one panel. I’d have thought they’d have continued with the “big guns” covers, but meh.

Random Stranger

August 7, 2008 at 6:03 am

I’m not part of the cult of Morrison. I find 90% his stuff to be generally either esoteric to the point of masturbation or horribly derivative when he substitutes part of a generic story with random craziness that never goes anywhere.

I am enjoying Final Crisis, though. The feeling I get is that this is being built as a graphic novel where the pacing and structure of the whole will be greater than the individual issues. It seems to me that it really is being written for the trade and not just two issues worth of simple story dragged out to seven. I want to get the whole thing in my hands so I can read it in one sitting.

Um… I actually enjoyed all the previous Crises…

And I’m a huge Morrison fan…

The problem with the previous Crises was that (like Civil War) there was too much happening in other comics outside the core title, so the whole thing jumped about from title to title with constant condensed catch-ups or footnotes to fill you in if you hadn’t bought Title X or Title Y…

Final Crisis looks pretty much like it will stand alone that much better…

And basically if you only enjoyed the first few issues of Morrison’s Doom Patrol, then you really don’t like Morrison at all… that’s kind of like taking the first few steps into the pool at the kiddies end, and realising that the rest of the pool looks a bit deep…

Sorry, not trying to be offensive or insulting… there are plenty of writers/artists whose work I don’t enjoy, despite their critical acclaim and vice versa, but if you really don’t like a writer that much, why are you reading this comic?

Random Stranger

August 7, 2008 at 6:05 am

“are we to assume Brother Eye was running Windows? Meh, should have just waited a week or two, he’d have blue screened anyway ”

Windows is what made Brother Eye turn evil and he was invincible since Batman installed a drinking bird that pushes the reset switch every time it crashes.

“The problem with the previous Crises was that (like Civil War) there was too much happening in other comics outside the core title, so the whole thing jumped about from title to title with constant condensed catch-ups or footnotes to fill you in if you hadn’t bought Title X or Title Y…

Final Crisis looks pretty much like it will stand alone that much better…”

Definitely nowhere near as bad as IC was in that respect – however, I must admit I’m a little bit cautious after seeing the next month blurb at the back (where it seems pretty certain you’re going to miss a whole bunch of stuff *unless* you pick up the various spinoff titles). It’ll be interesting to see (when all the issues are out) if you really can read the seven issues and not feel like you missed out if you didn’t pick up the spinoffs. My worry is that if you don’t get the Superman spinoff (for example), you’re suddenly just going to see the reverse of ROCKS FALL, EVERYBODY DIES with Lois – she’ll just come bounding in somewhere in issue 5 and someone says oh yeah, she’s better now. Ta daaaa!

I do love the way they use the DC Nation / Next month page thing as a kind of break in the action – again, when in trade I could actually see that causing a problem (I seem to recall either issue 1 or 2 using the DC Nation as a page break in a quite specific manner. Been a while since I read it so I could be wrong).

“Windows is what made Brother Eye turn evil and he was invincible since Batman installed a drinking bird that pushes the reset switch every time it crashes.”

If he’d only included an ANY key…!

Yeah, I’m torn on the tie-in stuff.

On the one hand, yeah, I don’t like tie-ins being so important.

On the other hand, if the only REALLY important tie-in is the one written by Morrison (and that seems to be the case), then isn’t this just basically a continuation of the main story?

So it’s like Final Crisis is 9 parts instead of 7 (more depending on whether Morrison’s other mini-series is important).

And since the Superman mini-series is taking the place of Final Crisis, I don’t think it is a problem.

IF that is the case.

If you “need” to read the other mini-series, then yeah, all bets are off.

I just read this. I am honestly very suprised that you liked it. I thought it was a mess. Morrison at his worst plus the DCU at its most confusing and joyless era ever is a bad combination. Whoever this series is for, it’s not me.

The point of the story is that there IS no joy right now.

Evil has won.

Then the superheroes save the day and bring the joy back.

William O'Brien

August 7, 2008 at 6:23 am

I highly recommend reading the three issues together. You see the complete picture much better that way, and it all makes sense. Like most of Morrison’s recent stuff, it reads better as a collective.

As someone who really liked Issue 1 and loved Issue 2, I found this one to be a bit disappointing. It seemed to run through its plot in a fairly obvious and exposition-filled way without the flair and menace of the first two issues. There was certainly nothing as weird and great as the Anthro-Metron scene or the introduction of the Super Young Team that kicked them off. But the Human Flame accusing Libra of coming across ‘kinda gay’ was hilarious.

Yeah, it was definitely a step down from the previous two issues, for the reasons you mentioned.

#2, I think, has been the best so far.

But a step down from two other great comics is still a very good comic.

Yeah… If it’s the same author expanding the storyline a bit, then it’s nowhere near as bad…

The Civil War bit that stood out most was the Punisher War Journal version vs the Civil War (issue 3?) version… If you’re going to re-tell something, speak to the head writer and find out EXACTLY what happens…

“So it’s like Final Crisis is 9 parts instead of 7 (more depending on whether Morrison’s other mini-series is important).

And since the Superman mini-series is taking the place of Final Crisis, I don’t think it is a problem.”

True – it just puzzles me why they call them spinoffs and not just include them as actual numbered issues of the series – its like they think people will lose interest and / or attention if it goes over 7 issues or something. Calling them spinoffs just makes us all think they might not be needed (when they probably are, resulting in much gnashing of teeth and confusion and “should I / shouldn’t I” at the counter).

Like the Superman Vs Superman fight in Infinite Crisis – a mess. The 3 issue story in the regular monthly Superman comics that covered the fight from start to finish? Awesome, awesome stuff. I wished they’d included those as actual IC issues.

I highly recommend reading the three issues together. You see the complete picture much better that way, and it all makes sense. Like most of Morrison’s recent stuff, it reads better as a collective.

The issues read fine on their own, but yeah, it does read better if you either

A. Read them together or

B. Have a good memory and can remember the plots from the previous issues.

Yeah… If it’s the same author expanding the storyline a bit, then it’s nowhere near as bad…

The Civil War bit that stood out most was the Punisher War Journal version vs the Civil War (issue 3?) version… If you’re going to re-tell something, speak to the head writer and find out EXACTLY what happens…

Civil War had quite a few instances like that.

Like the facility they held the unregistered heroes…in one comic, it was a hellhole while in Civil War it was immaculate.

True – it just puzzles me why they call them spinoffs and not just include them as actual numbered issues of the series – its like they think people will lose interest and / or attention if it goes over 7 issues or something. Calling them spinoffs just makes us all think they might not be needed (when they probably are, resulting in much gnashing of teeth and confusion and “should I / shouldn’t I” at the counter).

I think there are two reasons for it:

1. The mini-series starring Superman just stars Superman, so it is a different type of story, so Morrison didn’t want to include it in the series, proper

and

2. He just really liked the idea of having the gap between 3 and 4, to really highlight the “we’re in deep shit now!” feeling.

But yeah, I think it probably would have been better if it was, like, Final Crisis 3 1/2 or something like that.

“I’d have thought they’d have continued with the “big guns” covers, but meh.”

Well, the larger point is that a character as inherently recognisable as Supergirl (one of the only three DC characters to get a feature film, for crying out loud) SHOULD be a “big gun.” Certainly moreso than Hal Jordan or Barry Allen or, really, anyone else that isn’t the Big Three.

I liked it a lot, although it does seem that Morrison’s treading a bit into territory from his JLA run (Rock of Ages, specifically). I mean, that was a great story, but there’s a lot of repeated story beats, from a tortured Batman right down to using Lois to get at Clark. I half expect to hear someone saying “Darkseid Is” next issue.

(Actually, flipping through Rock of Ages… Batman’s big plan in Rock of Ages was… teaching a god what it felt like to be human. Hh.)

One other similarity: much like one of Morrison’s JLA stories famously did, this feels as though it’s going to get another chapter added onto the end of it. Which is good – the bad guys need to take things darker for a couple of issues before the slow fightback by the heroes.

Finally, the Supergirl cover puzzled me – I was expecting, y’know, some contribution to the story, instead of seeing her in one panel. I’d have thought they’d have continued with the “big guns” covers, but meh.

I think they’re considering her one of the big guns.

If you have seven spots, you give one to Batman, one to Superman, one to Wonder Woman, one to Flash, one to Green Lantern and….see?

Still two spots left, and even if you say Aquaman for one, that still leaves an open spot. Hawkman? I think Supergirl is just as “big” as Hawkman.

Aaarrghh!! I forgot that one…

The memory had been scabbed-over, now it’s raw again….

And yet they have these feted editorial meetings and writer conferences…

Yeah, it’s fair, Stephen, to say that Morrison is treading on some familiar ground here – but I think the delivery of the comic is what makes it stand out – the foreboding nature of the comic is unlike his other superhero work.

Compare it to JLA, which was all about the spectacle of it all, this is a much more grounded, and due to that, I think a scarier, menace.

Power Girl’s better and “bigger” than Supergirl… ;-)

Heh, I don’t think that’s how DC is measuring it, though…

I’m reading it because I am a big DC fan and I am always looking for a good story. I’ll try reading all 3 issues together and hope that I enjoy it more.

I do realize that I’m in the minority in my thoughts on Grant Morrison, but I honestly just don’t usually like the things he writes. I also think that a lot of people like him because it’s the “cool” thing to do.

“I also think that a lot of people like him because it’s the “cool” thing to do.”

That’s such an annoying, insulting falsehood. I wish people would just drop it. People like things because they like them, not to try to be cool.

Beat me to it, Joe.

I think it is time for a…Cronin Theory of Comics!!!

Quick, to the Cronin-Pole!

Plus, who (outside of comics readers) is going to think you’re “cool” because you read a Grant Morrison comic anyway? Not only do they not care (or indeed likely know who Morrison is), a good portion of them laugh at people who read comics because they think its juvenile and laughable to do so.

I can’t say I ever saw a comic reader say “wow, you’re cool” because they saw someone was reading Morrison (or anyone else for that matter) either.

So yeah, I’m fuzzy on the whole “cool” thing.

The insinuation speaks more to the self-perception of the insinuator than anyone else.

“Yeah, it’s fair, Stephen, to say that Morrison is treading on some familiar ground here – but I think the delivery of the comic is what makes it stand out – the foreboding nature of the comic is unlike his other superhero work. ”

Oh, no doubt. He occasionally dabbled with this type of tone in JLA (let’s face it, that’s the only thing we should be comparing this story to – everyone who only knows Morrison from Invisibles and Animal Man, or even X-Men… get out of the pool on this one, it’s not that type of story), but this is both differently-paced in that there’s less direct plot* per issue than the big JLA stories, and that there does seem to be a bigger scale and accompanying bigger problems as a result.

One big positive: he’s being very good about working the JSA into the story. While I still take issue with the fact that Black Canary’s something of an afterthought (I may not like the idea of the JLA having a chairperson to begin with, but at least use that if it’s there), but having Alan Scott be the one every hero turns to for leadership is a very nice touch, and a Terrific / Oracle scene was a long time in coming**. It does feel like a DC Universe story as opposed to a JLA story guest-starring the characters of the DC universe, and that’s an important distinction to keep up.

It did take a couple of reads to get all the plot points, though, since there’s some stuff in there that makes sense only if you read it with knowledge of events later in the story. The “helmet” dialogue from Libra, for instance, makes more sense once you see Wonder Woman wearing one at the end of the story.

Oh, and the line Hal gives of “only Green Lanterns in and out now” seems like it’s very much setting something up down the line.

* – Less panel-to-panel plot progression, even if the overall story has clearly progressed from where things started in the first book.

** – Unless I’m forgetting something in Checkmate.

Yeah, I’m sure the GL line will come into play, but I wonder if it will just simply be the fact that Granny, as possessing the Alpha Lantern, is able to come and go as she pleases.

By the way, anyone else notice the Monitor dude was drawing sketches (in issue 2 I think) and one of them was the Super Nazi Woman person that fell from the sky? Curious…

Stephen: I think there are also comparisons to be drawn with Seven Soldiers… lots of separate stories that are slowly going to come together/cross-over in obscure ways that feed into the overall picture…

I am liking it.

The slow, moody build of the first two seemed a little ponderous and dull, but damned if it hasn’t hooked me! It got under my skin in a way few books do, and now I’m totally down with where this is going.

And the Japanese heroes… totally killer.

Andrew Collins

August 7, 2008 at 7:40 am

Dangit Cronin, you’re almost making me want to cave in and actually read FC after all…

I think my favorite thing about the book right now is that you get this real meta sense that Darkseid somehow overturned the narrative structure of Superhero comic books as we enter a new world where evil actually wins. Weirdly enough, it makes the end of Mary Marvel’s weird flip flopping at the end of her character arc in Countdown make sense (though I KNOW that wasn’t the intent).

It’s almost that you need this Paragon of the Silver Age, who hasn’t been torn apart and remade by the corrupting, deconstructive force of the last twenty years in order to put the boat right side up again.

I also think it’s interesting that this version of Mary Marvel is so different visually from the one we saw in Countdown. There’s something almost intentionally cringe-worthy about looking at her now, which is very different from the quasi-titillation version in the black costume.

All that said, this still isn’t wowing me as much as I was hoping, but a lot of that is just unfair expectations.

Final Crisis is a typical Morrison comic, which means it has a bunch of crazy and interesting ideas and not particularly strong pacing or execution. As evidence, see anything else he’s ever written. Even with it’s flaws, I like it so far.

There are minor things that annoy me this series (in particular, referring to the New Gods of Apokalips as “evil gods” is a big one. Either come up with a cool honorific that implies fear and deference or refer to them by their names, but consistently using “evil gods” is just horrible writing.)

Reading this comments section finally nailed it for me. FC is ‘Rock of Ages’, only slower, duller, less coherent, less imaginative, and more cluttered with fanwank. Oh, and more drastically overhyped.

But, you know, I could just be reacting to some extent to three solid years of DC’s editorial staff telling me, “This will be the big, ultimate, crossover to end all crossovers that you just can’t miss, oh, it’s going to be so awesome!” Or maybe I’m just tired and cranky.

Nope, double-checked. ‘Rock of Ages’ is just much better. :)

Reading this comments section finally nailed it for me. FC is ‘Rock of Ages’, only slower, duller, less coherent, less imaginative, and more cluttered with fanwank. Oh, and more drastically overhyped.

Brilliant. Or better yet, it’s Rock of Ages for the Didio/Johns era.

Could someone explain the “fanwankery” criticism to me? I’m not getting what’s meant by that.

Could someone explain the “fanwankery” criticism to me? I’m not getting what’s meant by that.

It’s appealing to fanboys rather than trying to write a good story. The term makes more sense if you know what wank is a euphanism for.

It’s appealing to fanboys rather than trying to write a good story. The term makes more sense if you know what wank is a euphanism for.

I think his confusion was where the criticism was coming in this particular case. As in, “What about this issue struck (the general) you as fanwanking?”

As far as fanwank is concerned… I hope it’s just a reference to “who can we cram into a corner of the picture here…” á la Kingdom Come’s barroom shots…

And not something more derisive…

Of course, Rock of Ages was a time-travel story, resolved by returning to the present and preventing the crisis from happening in the first place. Not counting the Flashes, Final Crisis appears to be a present-day story. Usually those get resolved by combating the menace and rebuilding the damage, not by hitting the cosmic reset button. (Yes, it’s a Crisis, and we’ll probably see the multiverse realigned by the end, but it’s one thing to rewrite history to give you an altered playing field, and it’s another to rewrite history such that the conflict never happened.)

Y’know, I’m going to have to track down my trade of Rock of Ages and re-read it. (Favorite line: “I think that was Europe!” — one of the heroes, on seeing a gigantic firepit.)

>It’s appealing to fanboys rather than trying to write a good story.

I’d be pretty surprised if Grant Morrison isn’t trying to write a good story.

Yeah, I’ll admit some curiosity, as well, as to where the fankwankery comes into play with this comic.

I’m not defending the statement, but I think the return of Barry could be considered massive fanwankery. On the other hand, the Super Bad whatever team seams like the antithesis of fanwankery.

I’ll admit, I haven’t gotten past the first page yet. I just don’t get it, which was a problem I had with #2. I wasn’t expecting it to jump straight off the last page of #2, and that’s not my complaint anyway. I don’t understand how the players are related, and the sequence in general felt really jumbled. Could just be me.

I’m looking forward to finishing it when I have time to digest it better, but I really feel like I forgot something important or missed something completely.

“I don’t understand how the players are related, and the sequence in general felt really jumbled. Could just be me. ”

No, the first segment this time around was the weird one for me, as well. Father Time came out of nowhere for me.

But I really disagree with the fanwank thing (aside from the Barry return, which is more appealing to people in the DC offices and Morrison himself than the fans) – unless you inherently have a problem with the basic point of a comic like this, a story which by its nature involves an entire universe, there’s certain things which are to be expected. In this case, scenes where the armies form up and get ready to go to battle are more or less expected. And Rock of Ages was plenty full of so-called fanwank, what with glances at the JLA of the future and the evil holographic JLA of the present. I mean, what’s more pandering and fanboyish than Evil Clones? But the story worked regardless of stuff like that.

(Okay, the shot of Black Canary in her bra was excessive)

Although in terms of pacing, if you’re doing a direct comparison to Rock of Ages, it’s not that bad thus far. Rock of Ages was a rarity for Morrison in the JLA days – a six-parter – and was really a pair of three-parters (vs. the Injustice League, vs. Darkseid) linked by a McGuffin (the Philosopher’s Stone). The reason it seems slow is that instead of one A-story transitioning into another, FC seems like five or six B-stories that suddenly coalesced into one A-story. All that stuff with the Lanterns’ investigation that didn’t seem like it was going anywhere? It was to get Hal offworld and ensure no one could come to Earth’s aid. We now know why Libra was doing what he did. The stuff with Turpin is more or less answered, although it seems like a vehicle to transition Montoya into another story. Stuff like that. Sometimes in Morrison’s JLA run, you’d have to wait until the story completely ended before going back and figuring out what the hell had just happened; that’s not the case here, as most of the plot points have been pretty clear.

Considering Rock of Ages was a JLA story and this is a crossover, it seems reasonable that the change in pacing would be necessary – a story with only seven leads is going to be, by definition, more focused.. That isn’t necessarily worse pacing, it’s just different – if you actually sat down and wrote what’s happened in the various plot threads, I’d bet you’d be surprised as to how much is in each issue.

(Pacing structure in this is probably closer to One Million, which was similarly broad in scope in the first couple of issues before coalescing into the core story).

“Final Crisis” is a hit in my home. (Sure, I’m the only one who lives here, but still!) I was disappointed by the first issue, but 2 and 3 have made me very happy to keep reading.

I was at my friend’s house yesterday, a good friend from years back who discovered Morrison through me when I was reading and loving “Animal Man” and “Doom Patrol.” She’s not a regular comics reader but does enjoy the occasional graphic novel (she’s been a huge “Watchmen” booster for years now). Every other year or so, she picks up a Morrison comic (she sampled his JLA stuff, which by now is also many years old), and she was definitely intrigued by this one. She laughed (in a good way) at the title, knowing that Grant loves to imagine cataclysmic reality-warping scenarios of death, doom and entropy.

We spent a good couple minutes gazing intently at the cover — specifically, at Chip Kidd’s nifty contribution in the design. The “FINAL CRISIS” lettering running down the page in those two columns? It’s deteriorating. You could barely tell in issue 2, but if you compare 1 to 3, there’s a serious breakdown in the font quality. Such a smart touch. (In fact that works as a simile for the developing plot: Things are breaking down completely and (it seems) irrevocably, but it’s taking time before everyone figures it out.)

I’m picking up Jones’ portrait covers (not the variants that show a slice of the action) and I agree that Supergirl was an odd choice for this issue, since she didn’t do much. (But wow! She’s a visual artist and a musician? Talented teen, that Kara. Nice pad too.) Seems like it should’ve been Wonder Woman’s cover. Anyway, I agree, Brian: It’s clear DC wants to promote Supergirl as a big gun. (I much prefer Oracle or Black Canary, but … [shrug]) With each of the “trinity” sure to snag a cover, I wonder who that leaves for the seventh slot? I have a fantasy that J’Onn might be back at the end and he’ll take the final cover. (But I suppose it’ll be Aquaman or Hawkman.)

One of the plot beats that I’m most eager to see followed up (and by that I mean, I want ot see the very next moment, not where we’re at two weeks later): the Libra/Luthor confrontation. Clearly Libra knows that Luthor’s brain is too valuable to waste by turning him into an anti-life-equation zombie, so he offers him a chance to swear allegiance. I’m guessing Luthor’s smart enough to realize he can’t fight back at the moment, so he “swears” on the Crime Bible and bides his time (?). Anyway, also loved the Alan Scott stuff and the Sumo/Shilo/Super Young Team sequence.

Finally, I was super-stoked to see Frankenstein back in action. And how sweet is Jones’s layout on page 2? What a gorgeous sequence.

I don’t get complaints that this is “joyless” — sure, it’s dark and bleak now. Isn’t that the point of most plots that rely on supervillains? If there wasn’t a dire threat worthy of an army of heroes, then nobody would read the comic. I mean, come on — it’s not like we’re not getting gratuitous rape scenes.

In a similar vein, I don’t know why anyone should care if DiDio et al. hype this as a can’t-miss event. I mean, don’t read “Final Crisis” if you already know you dislike Morrison’s writing, but are you really going to hold the publisher’s attempt at creating buzz against the book? That doesn’t make any sense to me. People would be better off judging the likely quality of a comic by its creative staff, not by the ads and the buzz. Of course DiDio, Quesada and their marketing departments are prone to hype and dissembling — that’s their job. And sure, one of the best rules of thumb in comics is that company-wide crossovers are junk. “Final Crisis” might be an exception that proves the rule (especially insofar as it’s got less than two dozen tie-in issues, instead of more than 100).

The bottom line is: Read what interests you. I like the Rogues, so I bought “Rogue’s Revenge,” but I don’t see any tie-ins, really, to “FC” (at least not yet); I can only imagine “Rage of the Red Lanterns” or “Legion of Three Worlds” will be similarly self-contained stories that simply use the “FC” setting as backdrop. At any rate, we won’t know conclusively for another few months.

I thought “fanwankery” was writers refering back to fondly-remembered stories or concepts in their current work, often disregarding storytelling in the process. (e.g. bringing back the “classic” Legion; returning Barry Allen to life)

I don’t think Barry Allen’s return counts as fanwankery. Let’s be honest, Wally never really worked as the Flash. Some may say that he did, but he never really started gaining widespread popularity, acclaim and acceptance until Waid. And what did Waid (and later Geofff Johns) do? Turn him into Barry anyway.

More mature? Check.
Girlfriend is a journalist? Check.
He marries journalist girlfriend? Check.
No longer a playboy or jerk? Check.
Gets a secret identity? Check.
Gets his own Reverse-Flash archenemy? Check.
Has twins? Check.

Personality-wise and in many other ways, Wally West has just been made into a watered-down Barry since Waid and Johns. So why not just get the genuine article back?

Wally worked just fine as the Flash for plenty of people. He may not have appealed to you specifically, T., but that hardly means he didn’t work at all.

Most of the things you classify under “turning him into Barry” are entirely circumstantial. Aside from the twins, your list could just as easily describe Superman — who marries his journalist girlfriend, has a secret identity, isn’t a jerk, has an enemy who is his opposite (Bizarro), etc. Additionally, most of them didn’t come into play until the end of Waid’s tenure or into Johns’. As for the twins, given that there never were any stories about Barry and his kids, I’m not entirely sure how they’re relevant. The current “Flash Family” run is vastly different from any actual published Barry Allen Flash stories.

Now, what does this have to do with Final Crisis?

Yeah, it’s off-topic, but boy, they really did do a number on Wally, didn’t they?

I used to really love the character, but now, I could really care less if he or Barry is the Flash, that’s how much interest has been sapped out of the character for me via the end of Johns’ run and the Flash Family stuff.

It’s funny, the twins’ creation almost seemed reactionary to all the complaints in the wake of Identity Crisis – namely, that there was too much tragedy. So Johns hit a reset button on one of the tragedies that worked well, namely Zoom making his debut by causing Linda’s miscarriage and a wedge subsequently being driven between Wally and Linda.

(… still say it made more sense for Linda to be the Indentiy Crisis killer….)

But more mature / no longer a playboy / etc. aren’t “turning him into Barry”, it’s just Wally growing up. If anything, much like Nightwing, he’s a more emotionally complete, and therefore preferable, version of his mentor.

Back to the topic: am I the only one getting a kind of anti-Infinite-Crisis from this? Infinite Crisis was hyped up as the worst day in DC’s history, with all the buildup focusing on the trinity being driven apart and potentially at each other’s throats, then it death spiralled into a multiverse storyline tying up plot points from twenty years earlier that most people didn’t know or care about. Final Crisis was hyped up as being the end of the multiverse, but so far we’ve gotten very little indication of anything in that direction happening. Not that it CAN’T happen, mind you, but so far there has been precious little mention of multiple earths, for which I’m thankful.

Thanks for the answers. My question was a bit of both. I thought I knew what “fanwankery” was, my understanding being something along the lines of Mike Loughlin’s. And based on that definition, I didn’t see the “fanwankery” in the story. Interesting, though, to see the alternate definitions thrown in.

So, aside from Barry Allen coming back–which from the tone of issue 3 may be self-contained in Final Crisis–were there any other instances that I missed? Am not trying to be snarky, am genuinely curious.

So, aside from Barry Allen coming back–which from the tone of issue 3 may be self-contained in Final Crisis

No, DC made some big announcements in San Diego relating to Flash: Rebirth, which comes out early next year and stars Barry Allen. (I’ve been collecting interviews and commentary, if you want to read up on it.) IIRC, Grant Morrison actually was going to use an alternate reality Barry, which I assume would have been self-contained within FC, but Geoff Johns and Dan Didio convinced him to use the real thing.

To me (and I feel I should comment, since I brought it up) the fanwank comes in the form of gratuitous shout-outs, call-backs, and “easter eggs” for the die-hard Kirby fans. Things like the return of Sonny Sumo, an event only important if you’re enough of a Kirby fan to remember who he was from the 1970s, the inclusion of Dan Turpin, and others that I’m probably missing because I’m not a Kirby fan of that magnitude (at least, not of his Fourth World mythos–I thought he did better work back in his Marvel days.)

But you read the work, and there’s all these odd little moments that Morrison is putting emphasis on that don’t actually seem to be important to the plot. (Like the appearance of several characters from his work on Seven Soldiers and 52–are they there because they’re going to turn out to be vitally important to the plot, or just because he’s throwing up the horns and shouting, “Wooo! 52 and Seven Soldiers fans, give it up!”) Some of this might be less fanwanky by the time the series ends, but right now these characters and moments feel like they’re shoehorned in there just to get that thrill of fan nostalgia, fandom for the sake of fandom. Which is the definition of fanwank.

I have to agree with Kent. I think Grant Morrison is overrated and I haven’t enjoyed anything since Animal Man. Final Crisis is a mess as far as I’m concerned, and this is probably my last issue of it. I also look forward to him finishing this up and leaving the DC superheroes alone. I’ve tried and tried to like Morrison but everytime I read him, I’m always disappointed. Of course, I think alot of why Final Crisis is so bad is Dan Didio, I think his fingerprints are there everywhere. It’s not just Final Crisis that is a mess it’s alot of DC.

But more mature / no longer a playboy / etc. aren’t “turning him into Barry”, it’s just Wally growing up. If anything, much like Nightwing, he’s a more emotionally complete, and therefore preferable, version of his mentor.

Those things ALONE are just signs of maturity and are not enough to turn him into Barry, but those things combined with gaining a secret identity, marrying a reporter like Barry, having speedster twins like Barry, having the same powers, codename and costume as Barry, and living in the same city as Barry while having the same Rogues’ gallery? He’s pretty much Barry Allen lite. There’s barely anything to make him unique anymore. He’s not even humorous anymore. And Barry Allen, unlike Bruce Wayne, was never emotionally stunted in any way, so it’s not the same as Nightwing where the former sidekick is a more emotionally complete version of the mentor. If anything, Barry Allen is usually presented as more emotionally complete than Wally.

Most of the things you classify under “turning him into Barry” are entirely circumstantial. Aside from the twins, your list could just as easily describe Superman — who marries his journalist girlfriend, has a secret identity, isn’t a jerk, has an enemy who is his opposite (Bizarro), etc. Additionally, most of them didn’t come into play until the end of Waid’s tenure or into Johns’.

Okay, but in addition is Superman’s primary power super-speed? Does he share the same codename, powers and base of operations as Barry did? Have the same family structure? The same villains? See, Superman has superficial similarities to Barry Allen but he also has things to differentiate. In Wally’s case, when there are already so many things to make him similar to Barry already, adding more of these circumstantial similarities are really horrible for the character because you reach the point where the only difference is hair color, eye color and that he knows a little less science. You’ve taken away everything that made him unique. I’m not saying I dislike Wally West, I used to love the Mike Baron and Messner-Loebs version of Barry. I’m just saying that since then he’s just lost everything that made him unique to the point that’s if we have to have Barry Allen-lite, why not just go all the way and get the real Barry Allen now?

Now, what does this have to do with Final Crisis?

Someone in this comments section used Barry Allen as an example of how Morrison’s Final Crisis is engaging in “fanwankery.” I was showing how Barry Allen’s return wasn’t just an exercise nostalgic fanwankery but actually smart from a storytelling perspective.

Re: Rock of Ages

I’m kind of surprised by the way people are comparing the two… I guess none of you are working under the assumption that the DCU post-Final Crisis #3 is the future shown in RoA?

“The point of the story is that there IS no joy right now.

Evil has won.

Then the superheroes save the day and bring the joy back.”

Until Geoff Johns takes it away again :)

Okay, I’ve been searching since last night to get some views on #3 because I know the guy who also reads comics in my office probably hasn’t picked up the issue yet. So, I’m glad to see there’s been talk out there.

Here’s my honest opinion (without trying to make it seem like my opinion is more important or more “right” than anyone else, just trying to be honest with my own feelings toward the series to this point)… I don’t know what to think about this “event”. I have liked some Morrison and haven’t been interested in some of his other stuff. When reading, I like being challenged to either 1) stay on the edge of my seat and wanting to see what happens in the next issue, or 2) think of comics/characters in a different way.

I really liked Crisis on Infinite Earths and Infinite Crisis. Maybe I’m biased because the first was drawn by my personal favorite artist and the second written by my personal favorite writer, but I liked them. A lot. But I’m getting that weird feeling that this Crisis is obviously the third of a series. I feel like I’m watching Spider-Man 3 or X-Men 3… I have such endearing thoughts and feelings about the first two Crises that maybe Final Crisis cannot possibly match any expectations I give it.

I can deal with Morrison’s new ideas to tell the story and I can finally say that I’m over how very, very little Countdown had anything to do with Final Crisis (yes, I know… Morrison wrote Final Crisis while 52 was going on, but I’m not really seeing any correlation to much of anything else in the DCU at all). So, maybe my criticisms should be pointed at the chief editorial staff of DC (who allowed other stories to happen without guiding things into the same direction as this series) instead of the writer who did his job. But I just feel that if the first Crisis dealt with the destruction of the multiverse and the second Crisis dealt with the return of the multiverse, then where do you go? Do you keep it or destroy it or do they just simply don’t know what to do? I’ve kinda yet to see how the multiverse has much of anything to do with Final Crisis. This is billed as “The Day Evil Won”. Cool! Maybe call it something else other than “Final Crisis”, so those of us who think about something with the title of “Crisis” won’t wonder where the Earth-45 Superman is or when the Earth-Whatever-the-Hell Ambush Bug will come in and do something totally awesome. Yes, there is “Identity Crisis”, but I doubt anyone went into that thinking there was any connection to the original Crisis. Also, killing the New Gods and bringing them back with different costumes and different attitudes and the same old names, doesn’t make them cooler. It really kinda takes a whiz on Jack Kirby’s grave. If they are dead, leave them dead and do something new.

Okay, so some of my disappointment can be attributed to DC. What about Morrison? He’s doing what he does. People will either like it (or in a million circles, LOVE it) or dislike it. However, I do feel that he’s maybe taken this to a far more “mature” level than it needs to be – even though I like maturity in comics. At the end of issue #3, I can deal with Pig-Face Wonder Woman and Creepy as Hell Giganta. Where I’m really, really, really put off is S&M Batwoman (come on, a freakin’ ball-gag???) and Strung Out on X, Raver Chick Mary Marvel (uh… if you didn’t read Countdown will anyone really know what the f*** is going on with her and why she’s acting like Darkseid’s starry-eyed cult follower?). Catwoman kinda looks like Catwoman, but maybe she more dominatrix now? You can have a badass chick character without turning a lesbian into a sadomasochistic freak or an obviously confused girl into a leather clad, pink haired, reversed mohawk nutjob. I dunno… That last page made me feel like I’m reading “Crisis on Infinite Vertigo Worlds”.

I’m in the minority, I know. I’ll continue reading, just like I stayed in the movie theater through the entire showing of “Batman and Robin”, because I do that. I’m looking for that one moment in the story that turns things around. Unfortunately, “Batman and Robin” never had that, and I’m hoping this doesn’t end in some kind of great big disappointment. Also, before you jump my case, I’m not comparing this to “Batman and Robin”, but simply illustrating the point that I stick things out to see what happens – no matter what.

Oh yeah… Where was I when Martian Manhunter died? I shrugged and waited for something that gave me some kind of emotion about a major player being killed by some jobbers.

Where was I when Barry Allen returned? Waiting for it to be played out in a meaningful manner.

I’m in it for the long haul and maybe letting this stuff off my chest will help me open my mind to what’s coming. Although, I do realize as soon as I hit Publish, I’m hanging a target around my neck ;)

I’ve always seen “fanwank” used to refer to the stuff fans come up with to gloss over plot holes in stories they like and don’t want to admit sometimes have big stupid flaws (e.g.: the many, many explanations of why Han Solo appears to use “parsecs” as a unit of time; the insistence that when Xander on Buffy the Vampire Slayer claimed to have summoned the demon Sweet, he was just covering for Buffy’s sister Dawn; the explanation for why Klingons in the movies and after look nothing like the ones on the original Star Trek show (those were infiltrators!) etc.)

Granted, it’s hard to say that a piece of Internet slang has a “real” definition (see the many discussions of what the “true” definition of a Mary Sue is on this very site), but if you type “fanwank” into Google, that’s primarily what you get.

The definition people have been using here is what I’ve generally heard referred to as “fanservice.”

Not that I’m trying to say everyone has to use the word the way I say, but if some people are confused by the use of “fanwankery” in reference to Final Crisis, that might be part of it.

“2. He just really liked the idea of having the gap between 3 and 4, to really highlight the “we’re in deep shit now!” feeling.”

Also gives the artist time to catch up, and pre-emptively avoid delays that delays in artwork can provide (see Civil War).

“But, you know, I could just be reacting to some extent to three solid years of DC’s editorial staff telling me, “This will be the big, ultimate, crossover to end all crossovers that you just can’t miss, oh, it’s going to be so awesome!” Or maybe I’m just tired and cranky.”

That’s one reason why I’m reading it…to see if and what the new status quo will be. Maybe it is all a bunch of hoopla invented by DC’s hype machine…we’ll see.

“You can have a badass chick character without turning a lesbian into a sadomasochistic freak or an obviously confused girl into a leather clad, pink haired, reversed mohawk nutjob. I dunno… That last page made me feel like I’m reading “Crisis on Infinite Vertigo Worlds”.”

Isn’t that one of his stock in trades? ;) Well, him and quite a few other writers…

I’ve always been ambivalent about Morrison. I always found him to be a good, but waaaay overrated writer. This IS a step-up from IC, but I still liked the original Crisis more (what can I say, for an event like this, I much prefer seeing dozens and dozens of spandex clowns beating the crap out of each other while I’m wading in the shallow end :D ) Still, we’ll see how it goes. I’m still waiting to see what the whole ‘the day EVIL won!” thing is all about. Doesn’t evil always win 1/2-way through events like these anyway, and then the good guys mount an offensive at the end and triumph? If, at the end of #7, evil has still won, then yeah, it’ll be interesting…

This Final Crisis had one strike against it before I ever read the first issue, because it’s certainly not “Final” and what will the next letstakebelovedcharactersandmessthemup crossover be called, the “Post Final Crisis’? The “We’re Not Kidding This TIme It’s Really Final Crisis”?

Over the past few years, the industry has decided shock value is the only yardstick. Gee, remember when the death of Supergirl was such a heart tugging event? That’s because it WAS a special, rare event that had meaning in the story. Now, the question is only which character is going to be killed or mangled beyond redemption next month so the hype can continue. I mean, Freekin Dark Mary Marvel??? Sure, let’s take one of the few superheros in the DC universe that embodies childhood innocence and twist her around completely because we can’t have a universe with innocence in it, can we?

I remember reading the first Spiderman issue. I have grown up with the superhero world. And what is happening now in issues like Final Crisis is not great writing. It’s a self-destructive path of topping the last big blockbuster death and mayhem special with something even more destructive next time.

“Catwoman kinda looks like Catwoman, but maybe she more dominatrix now? You can have a badass chick character without turning a lesbian into a sadomasochistic freak or an obviously confused girl into a leather clad, pink haired, reversed mohawk nutjob.”

I took it as a visual gag. Everyone else is in S&M gear once they turn evil, but they can’t do that with Catwoman as she’s already wearing the stuff.

D. Eric Carpenter

August 8, 2008 at 4:44 am

I’m not seeing using the lesser known Kirby characters as indulgent…it’s part of the actual story. We’re pretty much seeing Morrison’s New Gods war at this point–anti-life equation and all. Sonny Sumo and others actually played a part in that back in the day.

But I don’t think it’s necessary to know that to understand what’s happening. Actually, I think it’s been pretty hammered in that the Gods are now taking possession of other bodies as opposed to actual physical incarnations: Darkseid, Granny, Mr. Miracle and Orion have pretty much all been displayed.

Morrison COULD have created wholly new characters and plugged them into the plot…but what purpose would that fill? It is a throw out to the people that read the original stories, but it’s not indulgent…it’s gives readers who are familiar with the older stories and idea of what’s going on a step or two ahead of the rest.

The same for the people that read Seven Soldiers…and I do agree that Final Crisis (at least the early issues we’ve seen so far) is more a sequel to that than to any crises.

I think the balls are still up in the air at this point. I’m curious to see how things all tie together in the next two issues. I’ll fully agree that if everything isn’t coming together by that point (not every plot point, but at least hte main themes), then I’ll have a problem with the series.

Nice review, Brian:

Just a thought: so far the three “alternate” covers are all heroes that have fallen and have been (or are being) resurrected. Barry, Hal Jordan, and Supergirl were all removed from the mainstream DCU and came back again one way or the other. So while the “column” covers seem focused on hopelessness–batman is helpless! wonder woman is evil! the big three are, um, cave paintings!–the alternate colors, on the return of these heroes, would suggest the opposite.

Anyway, I’m enjoying the series very much, to boot.

Geoff asked: “Oh yeah… Where was I when Martian Manhunter died? I shrugged and waited for something that gave me some kind of emotion about a major player being killed by some jobbers.”

I felt the same way, Geoff. It’s one of the reasons I was disappointed by the first issue. But I read “Requiem” and really liked it — it fleshed out J’onn’s assassination (complete with his attempts to fight back), then gave us the emotional aftermath on the part of his friends/fellow Leaguers (including Gypsy, which I think was key, because they historically had a surrogate father/daughter relationship that began in those crazy Detroit days). I kinda wish some of those “Requiem” pages had been in the main book, because they treated the death in a manner deserving of his character; it didn’t seem like a quick knock-off plot device.

I think Tomasi & Mahnke were able to wring genuine emotion out of a cheap death in Requiem. J’Onn is one of my favorite characters, and Requiem was a fitting tribute. I know he’ll be back (although I hope we don’t get Martian Manhunter: Rebirth. i don’t want to feel like I’m missing out because I won’t spend 18 bucks to read about his resurrection).

Thanks for your thoughts, John. And that also explains why I didn’t catch some of the “fanwankery” there. Even as a Kirby fan, I didn’t know who Turpin and Sonny Sumo were until I caught up online. Frankenstein I know, but he seemed there more to set up future stories with SHADE and the Question. To me, at least, that seems to be setting up some future plot points.

On Turpin and Sumo: would it then be better if Morrison had used new characters that served a similar role? If I’m not mistaken these are a couple of characters that haven’t done much post-Kirby (but I am definitely not up on DC continuity). As such, and as someone who didn’t know them before, I don’t see the problem in using them again.

Three issues in, it seems pretty clear that Sunny Sumo, Shilo, Turpin, and the Super Young Team are all going to play a significant role in the plot of FC. I’m not sure how that constitutes “fanwank” exactly. The Tawky Tawny, Streaky, and Cave Carson cameos might fit that bill, I suppose. Your mileage may vary, but I enjoy the occasional easter egg and the flashes of the Z-listers in crowd scenes in crossover books as long as that’s not the only thing the story has going for it. If FC was simply heroes and villains beating the shit out of each and and -hey look, Space Cabbie! – I think it would fit the bill of being fanwankery. But there’s a lot more going on, and it think it’s being done, so far, pretty well- certainly a step up from prior Crises.

“But there’s a lot more going on, and it think it’s being done, so far, pretty well- certainly a step up from prior Crises.”

As long as it doesn’t degenerate into the nonsensical “let’s invade Metropolis and have a mass brawl for no real reason whatsoever because comic events demand we have one at this point in the final issue” idiocy of final crisis, i’ll be happy.

I took the time to reread all three issues in one go today, and apart from one or two jarring moments it fits together really well – a lot better than I felt when reading the issues over the 3 months, certainly.

My main worry now is if this story just became a “what if” due to the Flashes being a few weeks into the future. Unless Morrison has some clever way of negating the “in the future” bit, nothing is going to feel particularly “final” as some loophole somewhere will magically undo everything because its “in the future” which I’m always a little wary of.

Also, while the “few weeks in the future” bit is a clever way of showing the world has gone to hell very quickly, it does seem a little like it was done purely so they could shoehorn Wonder Woman in for a dramatic final page in a way that made sense (as opposed just magically appearing there even though she was in Bludhaven a little while earlier). On reflection, I wish they’d used some other device to show the world had gone to hell in a short space of time. Even if they’d done a “two weeks later” text box somewhere and had the Flashes appear then complain they’d been running for weeks to escape the Racer or whatever, I’d have been happier with that even if that had meant they’d have to leave out a “shocking” final page reveal of Wonder Woman because putting her there wouldn’t have made much sense.

My mind didn’t actually go to Krypto on the last page. They showed us Wonder Woman hanging with the Atomic Knights and their mutant dalmatians in the previous scene, so I figured these were just offshoots of them.

[...] not sure two reviews of Final Crisis #3 could be more different than Brian Cronin’s and what I’m about to write. Cronin loved it, while I, well, [...]

i dont think that Barry Allen or Wally west should be flash. I think that it was unfair taking away Bart Allen’s turn to become the flash. Jay Garrik got like 20 to 30 years. Barry Allen got 30 years. Wally West got 20 years and Bart gets like 1? whats up with that? they killed bart way too fast. and wot i did like about the crisis’ was that wen people died, it meant something. but now, Barry is back and i havent read a booster gold in a long time but i think Blue beetle is back but no one is allowed to kno about his existance, right? I just think that Bart should hav been given the chance to be the Flash instead of giving it to Wally who’s character has changed from being a main character to now being a supporting character and Barry Allen who was the flash for a very long time and had a great death that i dont think should have been changed but mebe its like Jason Todd to Batman, it doesnt change anything.

FC is splendidly strange. These three issues have, so far, evoked a sense of foreboding. The build-up has been slow–with a lot of jumping around. Over all, the story works–in my opinion, anyway. That’s the impression that I get. And if that’s the impression that Morrison has intended so far (And I do believe it is.), then he has succeeded.

I’m still holding out to see what it is building up to, and to see if Morrison will tie up all the plots threads, and answer alot of questions I have…

Brad: Blue Beetle (well, Ted Kord anyway) Isn’t back from the dead. Booster tried to save him, but learnt the consequences of messing with time… Ted went back to make sure that he died in order to stop Max taking over the world.

Bart became Flash way too soon.. I really didn’t like the speed-aging to get him to adulthood… Bit of a “this Crisis we removed Wally from the story, but Bart’s a bit young to be Flash proper – I know, let’s age him!”…

Have to admit that I didn’t recognise Mary Marvel, because of herr hair colour.. It’s only a page or so later that I realise it’s dyed!! Doh!

I also agree that I don’t think it’s Krypto… Just another Dog-Pony like all the knights are riding…

And do you know what? I reckon that by the end, Countdown will be resolved with FC… I think we will find out what happened…

Fingers crossed anyway..

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