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Emoticons from the 1880s

A cute bit I came across while looking at Joseph Keppler was the discovery of emoticons in his magazine, Puck, in 1881!

Or as they term it, “typographical art.”

Hilarious!

25 Comments

That IS funny.

Talk about being ahead of your time. He didn’t even copyright them!

I think we need more “tyrannical crowd[s] of artists”…was this in response to anything in particular?

I think they’re just having a little joke.

…I remember when the emoticons started appearing back in the mid;80’s on BBS’s and BITNET relay chats, and someone quoted Keppler back then. Most people didn’t know who he was anymore, and apparently didn’t care that much. :-P :-P

I wonder what the Acronyms were like?

PTMS – Pray tell me, sir…

SSICL – Shifting Slightly In Char Laughing

FSIMI – Fanning Self in Mock Indignation

No doubt, these were meant to be used on Babbage’s Difference Engine?

And… I think I’m going to have to start using PTMS in ordinary ‘net conversation….

LOL. This is almost as good as when I found out that 1830s New Englanders liked to use “comical misspellings”. If only photography had been more advanced, they may have come up with lolcats on their own.

wow! love it!

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