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CSBG Archive

Let’s check out the answers to the panels contest

Well, I’ve been holding off revealing the answers until I could alert all the winners, but now it’s time! Aren’t you excited?

I received 21 entries, which was neat. Some people did quite well, and others … not so much. But that’s okay, because we’re all about the comics here anyway! I’m going to show the panel again plus the cover of the comic book from which I took it, plus comments. And I’ll break down which panel was the most difficult to identify. Shame on you people for not liking more crappy comics!

1. Strange Tales #166 by Jim Steranko, who wrote it and drew it. Even if you didn’t let me know that Steranko wrote and drew it, I gave you two points. I forgot to mention in the instructions to indicate that one person wrote and drew it, so it’s my bad. Nick Fury, by the way, didn’t get his own book until a few more issues of this comic had come out.


(Well, obviously someone stopped Voltorg, or he’d still be rampaging around!)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

2. Annihilation: Conquest – Starlord #2 by Keith Giffen and Timothy Green II. If you just wrote Starlord, I gave it to you. The Annihilation story is really good, if you want to know.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 9
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

3. My Greatest Adventure #85 by Arnold Drake and Bruno Premiani. This is the Doom Patrol, of course, but the name of the book hadn’t changed yet.


(There’s more than one “fury from 4,000 miles below”? That has to suck.)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 3
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 4

4. Legends of the Dark Knight #193 by J. H. Williams III, Dan Curtis Johnson, and Seth Fisher. Fisher, as you all know, is flingin’-flangin’ awesome.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 5
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 6

5. Inhumans #10 by Paul Jenkins and Jae Lee. This is a very cool story with stunning art. Paul Jenkins really fell off the map, didn’t he? Now he’s writing ancillary junk for Marvel. Strange.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 5
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 7

6. H-E-R-O #6 by Will Pfeifer and Kano. A forgotten gem. Shouldn’t there be more trades of this book?

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 10
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

7. Hellcat #1 by Steve Englehart and Norm Breyfogle. Breyfogle’s art is certainly distinctive, but how many people knew this was the epic Hellcat mini-series he and Englehart did in 2000?


(Englehart actually incorporates Ellis’s run on Hellstorm: Prince of Lies into this mini-series. That’s because Englehart is awesome.)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 1
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0
This was one of the most difficult one to identify. I was a bit surprised, as Breyfogle doesn’t work all that often so it seems like his work would be easier to track down. Or maybe I just like Breyfogle a lot more than most people do, so I recognize it.

8. Tales of the Unexpected #8 by Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang. Another trick one. There was no “Dr 13″ comic book; this was the back-up story in the comic, of which that largely panned Spectre story was the main feature.

(“I just ade my own vomit.” Tee-hee.)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 7
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 5

9. DC Comics Presents #85 by Alan Moore and Rick Veitch. Superman goes nuts, and only Swamp Thing can save him! Alan Moore proves once again that, even if he hates superheroes, he writes them pretty damned well.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 14
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1
I guess a lot of people own the Alan Moore trade paperback of random DC stories. There’s some good stuff in it!

10. Captain Marvel #3 by Peter David and ChrisCross. I ought to get more trades of this. The first one is interesting. Cap goes a bit loopy and remakes the universe. Isn’t that always the way?

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 4

11. Bloodstone #2 by Dan Abnett, Andy Lanning, and Michael Lopez. Before Warren Ellis reformed her, Elsa starred in a truly crappy mini-series. But it’s a guilty pleasure, thanks to asinine panels like this one.


(Man, that’s an awful cover. Really, really awful.)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 4
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

12. Avengers #93 by Roy Thomas and Neal Adams. This is part of the Kree-Skrull War (well, it’s included in the trade), but it’s Ant-Man inside Vision, finding out what’s wrong with him. A weird digression, but Adams’ art is, of course, wonderful.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 10
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 3

13. The Question #2 by Dennis O’Neil and Denys Cowan. Batman has nothing but contempt for Vic Sage! Check out the sneer!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 5
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

14. X-Men and Alpha Flight #1 by Chris Claremont and Paul Smith. Apparently the trade that includes this story is out of print. It has Paul Smith art on the mini-series, and Arthur Adams on the annuals that come out as a sequel. Come on, Marvel, get a new printing out!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 8
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

15. X-Force #102 by Warren Ellis, Ian Edginton, and Whilce Portacio. This was part of Ellis’ “Counter-X” thing he did with the minor X-books back in the day. Marvel is bringing them out in trade these days. It’s not bad. Not great, but not bad.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 4 (although no one, I believe, gave me Edginton’s name)
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

16. Wonder Woman #193 by Mike Sekowsky (writer/artist). It’s Diana Prince kicking ass! You really ought to pick up one of these kooky trades.


(“This is the only kind of law for a rat like him!” The Sixties rocked, man.)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 4
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 4

17. The Thing #3 by Dan Slott and Andrea Divito. One of Slott’s doomed seried. Oodles of fun.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 8
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

18. Spider-Man Loves Mary Jane #4 by Sean McKeever and Takeshi Miyazawa. Marvel does manga! And does it well! But it doesn’t sell a lick! Sigh.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 5
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 11

19. Silent War #1 by David Hine and Frazer Irving. Frazer Irving = awesome. The story is okay, but Irving’s art makes the book better than it should be.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 9
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

20. She-Hulk #1 by Dan Slott and Juan Bobillo. More Slott! Why doesn’t Bobillo get more work? This is great art. His Howard the Duck series wasn’t as good. But still – he should get more work.

(“It’s one of Iron Man’s loser villains. Snowflake? Freezer Burn? Chilly Willy?” Oh, Slott, you slay me.)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 12
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

21. Superman: Secret Identity #3 by Kurt Busiek and Stuart Immonen. This is a great story. I vacillated about this, because it seems like it’s obviously an Elseworlds, but it’s not listed as such, so I counted it.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 10
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

22. Legion of Super-Heroes #294 by Paul Levitz and Keith Giffen. This is part of the Great Darkness Saga. Darkseid takes away everyone’s power! Oh no! It’s always interesting to see Giffen’s art before he became so stylized.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 4
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 4

23. Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. #2 by Geoff Johns and Lee Moder. I like this comic, but don’t love it. It does feature some solid and not-at-all disturbing writing by Johns, though. I suppose he decided that didn’t pay the bills!

(Paintball should fight Batman. It has to happen!)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 7
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

24. Birds of Prey #59 by Gail Simone and Ed Benes. Huntress kicks ass and takes names!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 4
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 11

25. Sword of Azrael #1 by Dennis O’Neil and Joe Quesada. Look at Joey Q, drawing stuff! How cute!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 10
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

26. Fantastic Four: First Family #3 by Joe Casey and Chris Weston. This is an odd little comic. Weston just isn’t well-suited for superhero action, but the comic itself is interesting.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 4
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 7

27. Alpha Flight #13 by Steven Seagle, Duncan Rouleau, and Ashley Wood. This is actually a creepy issue, and Seagle probably got away with it because the book’s sales were in the toilet. Nice art by Wood, before he got really weird (and I like his weird art).

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 8
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

28. DC One Million #4 by Grant Morrison and Val Semeiks. You could just tell this was the God of All Comics, couldn’t you? It’s just that bizarre.

(“I’m holding the sun in my hands!” Come on – Morrison writes stuff like that while he’s eating his Froot Loops!)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 14
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

29. Strikeforce: Morituri #1 by Peter B. Gillis and Brent Anderson. Here’s another one that can’t be in continuity, can it? I guess it was supposed to be part of the New Universe (wasn’t that the subject of an Urban Legend recently?), but officially, it was released with just a Marvel logo, so it counts. Some of this series features early Whilce Portacio art, which is interesting to check out.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 2
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

30. X-Men Annual #3 by Ian Edginton and Gene Ha. Yes, Edginton and Ha writing a story about Storm, whom Shinobi Shaw tries to seduce. Good times!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 4
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

31. Xenobrood #0 by Doug Moench and Tomm Coker. Ah, Xenobrood! God, this series sucked big-time. I don’t know what Moench was thinking with this. I wonder if these characters have ever made any appearances in the DCU since this? Maybe one of them was slaughtered in Infinite Crisis and we missed it!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2
The fact that several people knew this was Xenobrood makes me sad. You should be ashamed of yourselves! (Of course, I own every issue, so I’m pretty embarrassed, too.)

32. X-Men Unlimited #32 by Will Pfeifer and Jill Thompson. Hulk watches a “Behind the Music” episode about Dazzler. One of the great obscure stories in recent Marvel history.

(“Hulk’s TV busted in fight with Abomination. Hulk hate Abomination.” Poor Hulk!)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

33. Black Panther #2 by Christopher Priest and Mark Texeira. Everett K. Ross sells his soul for a pair of pants. Brilliant.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 7
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 4

34. Sandman #5 by Neil Gaiman and Sam Kieth. Another trick one, as Sandman was not a Vertigo book in the early days. This was the issue in which Morpheus visits the Justice League and disturbs Scott Free’s nightmare.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

35. Fate #20 by Len Kaminski and Anthony Williams. Another lousy series, but I own every issue. I rule!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 0
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0
Yes, it’s the hardest one to identify (well, tied for the hardest), as absolutely no one guessed any part of it. Most people who guessed wrote “Dr. Fate,” but although that’s a good guess (what with all the Nabu talk), it’s incorrect. I suppose congratulations are in order, because nobody has read this crappy comic. Good job, people!

36. Resurrection Man #2 by Dan Abnett, Andy Lanning, and Jackson Guice. I got the first three issues of this and then dropped it. I know it didn’t last long, but I should go get the rest of them, just for the hell of it.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 9
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

37. Sleepwalker #2 by Bob Budiansky and Bret Blevins. Bill Reed’s favorite ongoing series EVER! This is the origin of 8-Ball, a truly classic villain. Who doesn’t love 8-Ball?

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 12
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

38. Spider-Man’s Tangled Web #4 by Greg Rucka and Eduardo Risso. Tangled Web was a cool little comic. This issue is about a soldier for Wilson Fisk who screwed up a job and needs to face the consequences. Cool stuff. The next two issues were the Milligan/Fregredo issues in which Rhino becomes smart, and then a three-parter by Bruce Jones and Lee Weeks. Good comics all!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

39. What If …? #87 by Dan Abnett, Andy Lanning, and Frank Teran. I guess this is another cheat, because it’s a “what if?” story, but it only has a Marvel logo on the cover, so it counts. This was the first (and best) issue of the revamped What If …?, which featured much darker stories. Sabretooth hunts Jubilee after killing a couple of X-Men. A pretty good book.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 10
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

40. Beyond! #2 by Dwayne McDuffie and Scott Kolins. Secret Wars III! Cool stuff with obscure Marvel characters!


(Well, that’s a charming cover.)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 8
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 6

41. Elongated Man #1 by Gerard Jones and Mike Parobeck. Bill Reed’s favorite mini-series EVER! Very funny story, with fantastic art by the late, great Parobeck.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 9
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

42. Heroes Reborn: Masters of Evil #1 by Joe Casey and Charlie Adlard. Back when Marvel did the whole “Heroes Reborn” thing, they did a few of these one-shots. This was a very funny one by Casey and Adlard. Of course, it ends rather seriously, but it’s a good comic.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 1
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0
Another very difficult one. Only Chad Nevett, who has an abnormal love of Joe Casey comics, knew this one.

43. Marc Spector: Moon Knight #55 by Terry Kavanaugh and Stephen Platt. The third volume of Moon Knight started well, but by the time Platt came on as penciler, it was pretty hopeless. I know Platt was a “hot” artist back then (and whatever happened to him?), but these issues (#55-60) are awful. Really, really awful.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

44. The ‘Nam #3 by Doug Murray and Michael Golden. Here’s another one that I don’t think was “in continuity” when it started, but didn’t Frank Castle make an appearance later on, which made it part of the Marvel U.? Great art by Golden.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 1
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 6

45. Livewires #4 by Adam Warren and Rick Mays. More poor-selling manga-influenced stuff from Marvel! This was part of that teen thing they tried a few years back that died on the vine quickly. But this series is pretty keen.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 4
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 4

46. Justice League America Annual #4 by Keith Giffen, J. M. DeMatteis, and Mike McKone. Yes, it’s Justice League Antarctica! And evil penguins! You know who doesn’t love the Giffen/DeMatteis Justice League? Commies, that’s who!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 11
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

47. Invasion! #1 by Keith Giffen, Bill Mantlo, and Todd McFarlane. Oh, that wacky Invasion! (yes, the exclamation point is required). Early McFarlane, early Sears, and 240 pages of sheer awesome.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 10
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

48. Chase #4 by Dan Curtis Johnson and J. H. Williams III. Poor Chase. It deserved better.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 12
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

49. Conspiracy #1 by Dan Abnett and Igor Kordey. I don’t know what was going on with Conspiracy, because it was two issues long and seemed ready to go somewhere, and then it never did. Has Marvel just decided to claim this never existed?

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 10
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

50. The Brotherhood #3 by X and Essad Ribic. Whoo-hoo, it’s The Brotherhood! It wasn’t a great comic, but it was part of that Bill Jemas “let’s throw everything at the wall and see what sticks” Era at Marvel. Good times! I don’t know if “X” was actually Howard Mackie, but “X” is credited, so “X” is the writer!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 0
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0
Here’s another one that no one guessed any part of. I thought The Brotherhood had a lot of potential that it never quite fulfilled. I’m actually surprised about this – it’s an X-book, after all. Fate I can understand – it was a spin-off of a book that never sold well in the first place. But this comic came out when Marvel was doing some keen things with the mutants, so it was interesting that no one knew this.

51. Aztek the Ultimate Man #7 by Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, and N. Steven Harris. Oh, Aztek! Why did you have to go? Was this one of the Morrison issues, or one of the Millar ones? Based on the Joker’s speech patterns, I’d say G-Mozz, but who knows. Either way, they’re both credited!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 2
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1
It’s out in trade, people! Pick it up!

52. Damage Control #2 by Dwayne McDuffie and Ernie Colon. DC collects an unpaid bill from Dr. Doom. Hilarity ensues. If this isn’t out in trade, it ought to be.


(“When Doom Defaults!” Bwah-ha-ha-ha!)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 8
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 2

53. Black Widow #1 by Devin Grayson and J. G. Jones. This is a fine series with gorgeous art by Jones. Okay, it’s only three issues, but he actually finished it!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 9
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 4

54. Doom Patrol #14 by Paul Kupperberg and Erik Larsen. I was trying to trick you by showing Dorothy Spinner, as she played such a big part of Morrison’s run. But she actually showed up first in this Kupperberg/Larsen classic!

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

55. Detective #470 by Steve Englehart and Walt Simonson. Silver St. Cloud was onto Bruce even before Marshall Rogers started drawing her! This looks nothing like Simonson’s art, but it was 1977, so he hadn’t grown into the master he became.

(His hair is damp because he digs the skinny-dippin’, of course! Come on, Silver, it’s just logical!)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 8
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0

56. Starman #66 by James Robinson and Peter Snejbjerg. This is part of the “Grand Guignol” story that went on and on and on (after the space story went on and on and on). I still liked it! Culp does nasty things. Because he’s, well, nasty.

(Boy, I hated the French in this title. Of course, I can’t read French, which is probably why I hated it so much.)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 7
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 6

57. Swamp Thing #60 by Alan Moore and John Totleben. Another pre-Vertigo Vertigo comic. This is part of the Swamp Thing In Space arc that Moore did after he made our hero too powerful to stay on Earth. This issue, “Loving the Alien,” is one of the weirder issues you might stumble across. Very cool.

(The purplest of prose!)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 5
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

58. Aquaman #6 by Shaun McLaughlin and Ken Hooper. Some people prefer McLaughlin’s Aquaman series to Peter David’s. I can’t agree with them, but this had its moments. Whatever happened to McLaughlin and Hooper?

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 5
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 1

59. Marvel Fanfare #5 by Roger McKenzie and Luke McDonnell. I apologize again for trying to trick you. This isn’t even the lead story in this issue. It’s a neat little story, though.

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 1
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 0
Another very difficult one. Sorry!

60. Batman: The Cult #3 by Jim Starlin and Berni Wrightson. Cool art by Wrightson, and not a terrible story by Starlin, but not great, either. Batman loses his mind to a charismatic preacher who tries to take over Gotham. Wrightson was a good choice, because parts of this are pretty creepy. Plus: A monster truck Batmobile!

(Does Robin look really freaky in panel 4, or is it just me?)

Number of people who got the entire answer correct: 6
Number of people who got everything right except the issue number: 4

There you have it! There were 309 total points (9 extra because two writers were credited), and here are the top three points-getters:

1. Peter Garcia Sanchez: 259
2. Zeb Aslam: 243
3. Satya C: 234
[Edit: More scores!]
4. Mike Loughlin: 188
5. Matias Duarte: 184
7. jazzbo: 168
9. Travis Pelkie: 147
12. Maxwell Y.: 136
13. Tim Callahan: 121
14. Chad Nevett: 114
16. Billy F.: 76

If you want to know how points everyone racked up, give me your permission in the comments section and I’ll edit it in! The fourth place finisher wasn’t really close, so I don’t feel bad about leaving him out of the money!

Thanks a lot for participating, everyone. It’s always fun to have contests, and I’m sure I’ll have another one in the future. I always like to share weird and wacky comics with our readers!

32 Comments

If my computer hadn’t died, I probably would’ve actually participated in this. And lost.

But still, awesome to see Sleepwalker and Elongated Man and McLaughlin Aquaman in here! Woot.

Never heard of Xenobrood.

I have a bad feeling that i was the one that ended up in 4th place…

Well, judging by those scores, I wasn’t even CLOSE to winning… but I’ll take pride in being the only one to get that Masters of Evil one-shot page… although, is “pride” what I SHOULD be feeling?

Actually “The Brotherhood” writer turned out to be J.D. Salinger, from “Catcher in the Rye” international fame.

I recall having read it in some Wizard Magazine Anniversary issue of this past year.

Who doesn’t love 8-Ball? Abnett and Lanning, who pointlessly killed him off in the Heroes for Hire mini that launched the most recent failed Heroes for Hire series. Boo, Abnett and Lanning, boo! 8-Ball just strikes me as a perfect Spider-Man style villain somehow.

Dammit…I own that damned Hellcat mini and I still didn’t get it. I have no clue why I couldn’t remember that. Bah!!

The rest of the ones I didn’t get I don’t mind so much…at least I don’t own them. But that one…AAGH!!!

And I’m gonna have to look up that Brotherhood book. Sounds cool and the early Esad Ribic artwork is pretty decent.

I kinda like that Bloodstone cover, actually- it’s kinda retro-fun. But then again, I have no taste.

I think that Simonson art was inked by Al Milgrom or someone like that, which is why it doesn’t look like him.

And you’re not so special- I have that Fate series, too! You’re right, though, it does suck, although it does have its moments.

“Actually “The Brotherhood” writer turned out to be J.D. Salinger, from “Catcher in the Rye” international fame”

Well, there’s a new Comic Book Legends for you guys to research.

ARGH! I’m kicking myself for not recognizing that issue of The Question! I love that series! At least I got Denys Cowan right.

Also, I missed the classic Greatest Adventure story by one issue and lost six points because the title was renamed “Doom Patrol” with the next issue… but I was winging it so I don’t feel that stupid.

(You have my permission to show the world how badly I did, btw. I’m Maxwell Y.)

Congratulations to all the winners!

You have my permission to post my *sniff* losing score.

Yeah, I want to know my score. I did a lot worse than I thought.

I was one of the 2 that got Strikeforce Morituri, though. At least that was something hardly anyone else knew. Everything else I knew everyone else knew.

And I have the Great Darkness Saga and I didn’t get that one. Arrgh!

“And I’m gonna have to look up that Brotherhood book. Sounds cool and the early Esad Ribic artwork is pretty decent.”

Don’t bother. It’s really awful. It tries really hard to be significant and subversive, but it’s just trite and meandering. The art’s not bad, but nothing to write home about, either.

Also, feel free to post my score.

Chad: Sure, you should be proud! That comic is quite fun!

Johnny B: I don’t mind the the layout of that Bloodstone cover, but the drawing of Elsa is just weird.

Wow, I honestly thought I had a shot at winning this, mainly because I figured no one would take the amount of time I did looking up so many answers, and just call it quits. Because, damn, I spent way too much time looking up answers, and obviously still didn’t do that good. Oh well, it was fun. You can post my score.

Ah, yes, Invasion! I was always a big fan of that series. It’s a shame it seems to be rarely referred back to anymore. Unless I’m just reading the wrong books.

Oh, and I may be one of those who preferred that Aquaman series to Peter David’s. In fact, there’s a lot of David’s work I don’t like. But that earlier Aquaman series was a little more subtle an thoughtful, I think. Some may have just found it boring. Now, does anyone remember that the series hinted that Aquaman’s inability to stay out of water for more than a certain amount of time was hinted at as being not true or part of some lie? Did I just imagine that?

FunkyGreenJerusalem

December 7, 2008 at 8:34 pm

It does feature some solid and not-at-all disturbing writing by Johns, though. I suppose he decided that didn’t pay the bills!

I find it weird to read stuff like this – I’m not doubting at all that he’s written stuff that is, people have posted panels etc, it’s just I’ve got a few of his books, and I’ve never seen him write horrific violence or misogyny or killing children etc.

Wow, I can’t believe how many issues I actually own on this list but still didn’t recognize (a Sandman AND a Swamp Thing issue slipped by me..?).

I didn’t participate, which is just as well as I could only identify about eight panels browsing through them (and only the Great Darkness Legion panel was instantly recognized…)

A fun contest, though, even if only viewed from the sidelines…

Actually “The Brotherhood” writer turned out to be J.D. Salinger, from “Catcher in the Rye” international fame.

I recall having read it in some Wizard Magazine Anniversary issue of this past year.

I think you should note the probable April Fool’s date on that particular issue of Wizard.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

December 7, 2008 at 9:39 pm

I think you should note the probable April Fool’s date on that particular issue of Wizard.

I think he’s gotten it confused with the end of the Chuck Austen run on Action Comics, where either they changed it from Austen’s name for sales reasons – both companies got sick of him at the same time – or the editor stepped in and re-wrote the issues.
The name credited on the issues was ‘J.D Finn’, a combination, if I remember correctly, of J.D Salinger and Huck Finn, the editors fave writer and character presumably.

I obviously got dominated. But you can post my score.

Wow, 9th place, not too bad, sorta.

Tim, you were obviously too busy trying to figure out RIP :)

And on a tangent, wouldn’t it be cool if JD Salinger was writing comics? Let’s get him, Thomas Pynchon, and Harper Lee together on, let’s say X-Men. Who’s a reclusive artist that could do that book?

Re: Conspiracy.

It seems to be in continuity — there was a mention of one of the characters featured in it and some conspiracy theorizing in the current volume of New Warriors #7.

As someone who bought the issues of Conspiracy when they came out and enjoyed them enough to re-read them a couple of times after, it was a nice and awfully obscure tip of the hat.

Have a good day.
John Cage

Tim: Well, you beat Chad! That’s something, isn’t it?

GAH! By seven points!

Strange that our scores were so close, though.

@Travis Pelkie: Bill Watterson?

4th place! Aaargh!!!

Oh well, at least it wasn’t close. It’s easier to lose by 46 points than 2 points.

Oh wow I did terrible. I just know it.

And the sad thing is…I own half these comics!

Damn. You can post my score Greg. I’d like to see how terrible I did.

How did I miss Sandman and Aztek? Son of a bitch…

Fate’s not that bad, but it didi get mildly better after it became Book of Fate.

And you really should get the rest of Resurrection Man, it really was an engaging read right up to the end.

The Rouleau-era Alpha Flight never got the love it earned.

Maybe J.D. Salinger became interested in comics after son Matt played Captain America! ;-)

@tk : Yes! I would totally buy the JD Salinger/Bill Watterson “Wolverine fights Sabretooth, and phonies” 12 issue maxiseries!

Harper Lee and Gary Larson’s “To Kill Ronin and a Mockingbird”. Wah-wah!

@Lee: Since you’ve got a smiley by it, I assume that Matt Salinger isn’t actually JD’s son. But that might explain why Wizard picked JD as the ID of X. Way too many initials.

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