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Morrison/Quitely on a Batman Title?

Let’s hope the rumor (courtesy of Rich Johnston) is true!

I really would like to see Morrison actually conclude his run as intended rather than see it cut short like it looked like it might be. So, hooray (if true)!

And Quitely, too?!?!

Awesome!

61 Comments

It’d be the bee’s kness!

They should announce it just in time for Christmas. It could be DC’s gift to the world.

So, let’s see how often a new issue will come out …. every 3 months?

That ought to please Morrison/Quitely fans.

After all, look what happened to the New X-men with Morrison/Quitely.

“So, let’s see how often a new issue will come out …. every 3 months?”

Oh seriously, grow up.

If your that bothered about a comic coming out regularly then i suggest you go and read the hundreds of titles that both big publishers put out like clockwork month on month that are sh*t.

Il take a quality title that trickles out over some generic sludge any day of the week. Can i suggest that you gain some interests outside of comics that could perhaps provide you with some relief inbetween the harrowing wait you must experience waiting for late comics.

Whatever happens, a comic penciled by Quitely is a gain at all!

Revolving artistic teams, like on Green Lantern at the moment, would minimise delays and allow artists better suited to the story arcs to do those issues. Someone on the Batman forums said JH Williams, Andy Kubert and Quitely might be the best bet and I’d agree except I’d add Doug Mahnke to the list too.

Quite frankly, it’s a wonderful notion. Perhaps we can all get the clarity and closure we crave!

Or not.

Hmmmmm.

This is fantastic, but please, for the love of God, I hope DC isn’t insane enough to think they’ll get a regular monthly title out of Morrison and Quitely. I’d be happy with Quitely doing, like, three or four issues a year with the rest filled out by whoever’s available, especially if Morrison goes through with having more oneshots and small arcs – I’d love to see Tom Mandrake, Cameron Stewart (as long as it doesn’t screw with Seaguy too much), Sensational Artist Find of 2008 Marco Rudy, Dustin Nguyen or any number of talented artists doing Dick and Damian versus Professor Pyg oneshots or whatever.

Mr. P.

I’ve been reading comics for nearly 30 years.
Never have liked late books (especially if they’re supposed to be monthly).
I’ve seen the Morrison/Quitely team-up several times, and with the exception of New X-men, the collaboration has rarely been on time.

If this one is a 4-6 issue story arc for Batman. Good.
If this is on-going, then expect lots of fill-in artists.

Late books should not ever be accepted as the norm.

Hope its nice and warm where you live, cuz’ its colder than hell over here.

Notice that Johnston’s rumor doesn’t say that Morrison will be “back on Batman”.

It says that Morrison will be “back on a monthly Batman book”.

There are a lot of ways that phrase can be interpreted. Only one of them involves Quitely penciling for “Batman”.

And as far as lateness goes – there is one writer/artist team that I will happily wait for years to get the final result from, rather than have a fill-in artist come in to pick up the slack. That team is Morrison/Quitely – each of their best work has been when they were working together and anything that encourages that collaboration is excellent as far as I’m concerned.

No doubt Jer, that Rich’s phrasing was curious enough to think perhaps it will not be in continuity. But the thing that makes me think that perhaps it IS is the fact that he says “monthly book.”

If it was, say, a new All Star Batman comic (which would be fine, of course, I’d have no problem with that notion), would they call it a monthly comic?

If you think so, then yeah, Rich’s phrasing makes it look like it likely is an out-of-continuity comic. But if you think not, then I believe this is a continuation of Morrison’s run.

I could see it being a new, third Batman & Robin ongoing or something.

Yeah, good call, David.

But who would write Batman (don’t say Tony Daniel don’t say Tony Daniel don’t say Tony Daniel)?

Tony Daniel…

But seriously, this is exciting news. I was just rereading Batman: The Scottish Connection, and wishing for more Quitely Bat-goodness.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 7:53 am

This reminds me of something I’d been mulling over before regarding Morrison…he really does so much better writing for non-photorealistic artists, doesn’t he?

Even more than that I might say that Morrison’s work is very much heightened (or dependant, I guess one might argue) on the talent of the artists collaborating with him.

Jimenez’ work veers more towards the photorealistic end, Cam Stewart and Bond are on the more cartoony side, and Quitely and Williams III are somewhere in the middle.

I think it has more to do with the fact that Morrison’s work is very centered on concepts and “beyond the norm” images (as opposed to Gaiman and Moore, whose work is more focused on a traditional literary tradition). Morrison tends to write LIKE an artist, and thusly FOR an artist. Unfortunately, this means that without a great artist the story can fall short sometimes.

With said great artists though, the story soars.

“Quite frankly, it’s a wonderful notion. Perhaps we can all get the clarity and closure we crave!”

Quite frankly—intended joke? or you’re just an idiot?

Give Quitely enough lead-time and there’s no real reason at all why he can’t deliver…
DC by now should be able to work out how long he takes per issue on average and factor that in… Heck, give us three months of Quitely, then three months of someone else, then back to three months of Quitely… Or if Mr Morrison can write that far ahead, six-month arcs. The trick being that you don’t let Mr Quitely stop… He’s already working on the next arc…

Captain Trips:
I don’t know if Richard Pachter meant it as a joke, but the artist certainly did…

“Frank Quitely” is a Pen Name…

Yeah, it’s all about the lead-time.

Which might explain why the Batbooks are going to be full of fill-ins and filler until — what — June?

Half a year should be enough time to get at least a couple issues in the can.

Brian,

Come on. Shouldn’t we wait to see the first issue of Battle For the Cowl before completely slamming on Daniel as a writer? He’s a guy who always at least TRIES to improve his craft and it’s been years since we’ve seen him write anything.

I’m all for judging a comic in advance when there’s a lot out there that we can go off of, but I don’t entirely feel that’s what we’re dealing with here.

*****
MR P:
“So, let’s see how often a new issue will come out …. every 3 months?”

Oh seriously, grow up.
******

This is what I tell my professors every time I hand in my projects 2 months after the due date. Strangely, they don’t see it as a matter of maturity, and typically just gives me an F.

Suppose it were Morrison writing and Rob Liefeld on art chores, and Rob was taking months delaying each issue to finish his art (and also probably not working the entire time). This would be no problem to you, cuz, y’know, its “mature” to wait 3 months for a monthly with art you don’t even like. Yes, inconceivable though it may seem, maybe Tom Fitzpatrick is lukewarm to Quietly’s art, or maybe he’d prefer 12 Morrison Batman stories a year with mediocre art than 4 Morrison stories with great art. What a baby.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 11:21 am

Even more than that I might say that Morrison’s work is very much heightened (or dependant, I guess one might argue) on the talent of the artists collaborating with him.

That’s been the conventional wisdom among Morrison fans for some time, but then it becomes fairly hard to find anything he’s written for a photorealistic artists that’s…well, that’s any good.

I mean, J.G. Jones is an excellent artist, but both Marvel Boy and Final Crisis are…not so good. And weirdly, Morrison’s work with comparatively mediocre artists — Richard Case, Howard Porter, Chas Truog — tends to “work” mush better in pure storytelling terms than FC and its elliptical story structure or Marvel Boy and its substitution of attitude for plot.

I think it’s precisely for the reason you state elsewhere, though: he writes surreal and conceptual bits, and he apparently scripts panel layouts themselves. This tends to do bad things to photorealistic artists, not least because certain things don’t “pop” as they should in the script because, well, everything looks “real” and nothing looks “abstract.”

Final Crisis, for example, is supposed to have a fair amount of weird and bright “color”
to it, both visually and scriptwise. After all, the new Justifiers are the Secret Society members with helmets on, the new Furies are converted superheroines, and Kalibak’s a freaky tiger-man from issues of Kamandi.

But when everything’s give the same level of detail, a scene with, say, Tim Turpin beating the Mad Hatter witha toilet seat loses something precisely because the style of art, being “realist,” wants desperately for both Turpin and the Hatter to “belong” in that same scene visually. Instead of the grizzled old cop pounding the dwarfen costumed lunatic, it’s the grizzled cop pounding a weirdly-dressed but basically ordinary-looking little guy. The contrasts — and one of Morrison’s themes is the contrast between the surreal and the costumed with the ordinary and the muted — are totally lost, and this, I think, is no small part of why so many readers have gotten lost in FC.

Photorealist art with super-rich, saturated computer coloring is just not the way to get over the kinds of things Morrison wants to get over in his stories. The artistic tradition he “thinks in” is an older one superimposed ont he newer one, not simply the new one.

Marvel Boy not good? You, sir, are severely mistaken. Or an idiot.

For God’s sake. Shut up about the late/not-late debate. Deadlines are nice and all– especially when they make the whooshing noise as they fly by, as Douglas Adams used to say– but in artistic industries, the artist should be allowed to finish their work to their satisfaction.

This is why the European comics guys roll their eyes at the American industry.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 12:32 pm

I’m neither mistaken nor an idiot on that one, test. But I find your insults amazingly convincing evidence that you’re either wrong or utterly incapable of explaining why you may be right.

Come on. Shouldn’t we wait to see the first issue of Battle For the Cowl before completely slamming on Daniel as a writer? He’s a guy who always at least TRIES to improve his craft and it’s been years since we’ve seen him write anything.

And I’m sure he’ll be improved.

But since he was TERRIBLE then, and hasn’t written since, I think it’s perfectly reasonable to be worried about the guy taking over Batman at this point.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 12:38 pm

Ay, there’s the rub, ain’t it, Bill? Is a Batman comic a work of art, or an entertainment commodity? Platonic ideal of l’art pour l’art aside, does publishing in periodical format, as opposed to OGNs, bandes dessinees, or phonebooks-o’-manga, produce expectations regarding publication frequency?

That said, I’d be perfectly happy if DC just published an oversized graphic album of Morrison/Quitely Batman two or three times a year as completed rather than publishing 24+ single issues featuring the character. I suspect their scary, bigger cellmate Time-Warner and various retailers might disagree with me there, though.

I never understand the compulsion people have to argue positions that they think are totally wrong.

As though not responding to “Marvel Boy and Final Crisis are not-so-good” would legitimize the statement or something.

If you think someone’s position is ridiculous, it’s better to ignore than to respond. Best to argue points where you think there might actually be a point to the argument.

Wow, tense bunch.

On the one hand: It’s just comics, and yes, lateness on a book shouldn’t put too much of a crimp in someone’s lifestyle, and some artists with more details tend to take longer to produce work they feel is of quality.
On the other: Publishing is a deadline-driven market, so it’s not wildly unreasonable to expect that a “monthly” book comes out, y’know, monthly.

So: Two acceptable viewpoints. Nobody’s an idiot.

(Someone else made the point that if it was Rob Liefeld taking all this time and not Frank Quitely, everyone would be up in arms at the prima donna. Which is a very good point, although one could argue that “cross-hatching and speed lines” isn’t quite the same as “heavy detail.”)

“Grow up,” “idiot,” “shut up.” God forbid people have opinions different than your own.

Oh, and I can’t wait to see Morrison and Quitely on Batman, I don’t want any fill-ins, I think Marvel Boy is a very good comic, and I have no interest in reading a Tony Daniel-written Batman comic.

More on-point, I’m mostly concerned with the possibility of Morrison leaving the book mid-run, since his books are always written in a novelistic style, each issue a “chapter” in a larger book with a beginning, middle and end. And ‘Batman: RIP’ is definitely in a middle area.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 1:06 pm

Don’t get me wrong, I like Marvel Boy. I even like Final Crisis. But I don’t think they work as well or as consistently as the Morrison stuff I’d defend to the bitter finish, like Doom Patrol, Animal Man, Seaguy, WE3, NXM, JLA, and Invisibles.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 1:07 pm

Oh, yes, and “I like =\= “they’e good.” I like plenty of things that are medicre and flawed, not least of which includes me.

Man I was holding out hope they would do a Fifth World Book. But then again Batman sells and the New Gods don’t.

I’m with Grant above me (wow, was that sexual?) – I was hoping for a Morrisonian Fifth World that took Kirby’s nuttiness with some of Grant’s out-there scripting.

But i’ll happily settle for a Morrison/Quitely reunion on a Batbook. More than happily!

I just don’t get the uproar over late books. Is your goal to read a good comic, or to read a comic every month?

It’s a piece of art. Stop obsessing over its success as a product.

This is the first comic book news that make excited for 2009!

I just wish DC and the creators involved would choose to release it every two months instead of monthly. I think it would more realistic, and will probably prevent the delays that annoy some fans so much.

Quitely in a monthly comic is waste of talent ,3 or 4 issues a year at most.
In NXM was bad you have a Quitely issue then another artist for the next three and so on .
You have to give the man space and patience (All Star Superman).
But DC kinda like to waste talent , see JG Jones in FC.
In the other hand Morrison have to try to arrenge the mess he created but he cant take two years for a six issue Quitely comic.
I really hope that is a story like All Star Superman.
But DC never dissapoint , so there goes my hope.
But a man can dream.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 5:08 pm

Wven though the Azzarello/Bermejo Joker wasn’t my favoritest story ever, being quite average and eminently missable,* it did seem like a very smart move on DC’s part: it’s in a format that permitted a fair amount of freedom of execution (if not publishing mandate), it was commissioned in advance of the film for the marketing people, and it’s also in a bookstore-friendly kind of trade dress.

Why the hell not make that a matter of course with high-profile creators, especially those with long lead times? And as with the Joker HC, don’t worry if it’s continuity or not. Just publish it.

The monthly comics format isn’t good for certain kinds of creators for all sorts of reasons. It imposes formal limits if taken seriously and doesn’t work in its own blasted format if those limits are ignore. Since it’s marketed as a regular periodical, it generates ill will that eclipses the content as matter of its practical existence. And its major function anymore seems to be as a cash-flow device to support the publisher in the short term and to maintain the direct market distribution system for bigger-ticket items.

There are creators who do great things with the serial format, and stories that aren’t gonna fill a TPB. But as with film, where short subjects are basically nonexistent for most moviegoers and will not be generated by major studios, the market and venues mean something for comics formats. If the direct market is going to be supported, it needs artistic methods and publishing formats geared towards it; the bookstores need different things. And the publishers need to stop pretending that there’s a drugstore spinner rack on every corner, and quit pretending to be magazine publishers. All that does is allows the odious Diamond distribution monopoly to continue forever.

That said, the seamy undercurrents of the publishing business are always going to affect mass-produced creative material, and are always gonna legitimate arguments about the sales and marketing end of it. I wish, I really do wish, that comics could be generated as artworks are generated, but it’s not going to happen…so the compromises with the business end ned to be made realistically by the publishers first, and the customers second. ‘Cause frankly, as stupid as whining about late comics may be from a quality control perspective, and as irrelevant as it ends up being to single issue sales in the DM, it nonetheless allows outsider (and more pertinently, I suspect, insider) perceptions of comics as juvenile and unserious stuff — as kiddie commodity instead of grownup art — to continue.

Miss the deadline for getting your brilliant short story to the New Yorker or McSweeney’s, or send that packet of chapbook material off two weeks after Poetry Magazine’s solicitation deadline, and it doesn’t get published there. Why should the art and story for the monthly tales of Spand-X the Avenger battling Lord Lycra and Thunderthighs betreated any different?

* I eagerly await being called a mistaken idiot by fans of Azzarello. Maybe the next guy can work in something about me molesting children while they’re at it.

I think deadlines for certain creators have a place: if the company making the product solicits the product as arriving on a certain date, it needs to be there on or near that date (barring outside forces, e.g. artist breaking his hand, printer problems).

On the other hand, one has to realize that Quitely (or JG Jones or Bryan Hitch) aren’t going to work at a pace that will allow them to keep up with a monthly deadline. The talent and company should be able to work out a timetable that accomodates both of their needs.

Personally, I’ll wait as long as necessary for quality comics. I remember the gap between issues of The Maxx got longer and longer as the series went on. The last issues of Sandman and Y took longer to come out than expected. Watchmen, Camelot 3000, Dark Knight Returns- they all had long waits between the penultimate and final issues. I don’t like the wait, but imagine Watchmen 12 looking like that last issue of Infinite Crisis, with Pat Broderick and Vince Coletta handling the finale.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 6:59 pm

imagine Watchmen 12 looking like that last issue of Infinite Crisis, with Pat Broderick and Vince Coletta handling the finale.

I think I just threw up a little in my mouth.

Again, though seems to me like Hitch, Jones, Quitely, etc. should be doing OGNs. Then there’d be no question of rushing them, or of fill-ins. Certainly they shouldn’t be put on big crossovers, where books that are done and ready are held back by the publisher if the appropriate crossover-mini issue hasn’t dropped yet.

Come on. Shouldn’t we wait to see the first issue of Battle For the Cowl before completely slamming on Daniel as a writer? He’s a guy who always at least TRIES to improve his craft

Wait…this was my first exposure to Daniel, are you saying what we got is an IMPROVED Daniel? So you mean he used to be worse and even more amateurish in his pro career? Scary thought…

I just don’t get people who would rather have Tony Daniel monthly than Frank Quitely whenever he damn well pleases.

I eagerly await being called a mistaken idiot by fans of Azzarello. Maybe the next guy can work in something about me molesting children while they’re at it.

I, too, am no fan of Azzarello, but I do think that he was the right guy to go to if you want to make a comic to appeal to fans of The Dark Knight, especially those who are not comics fans. A misanthropic, cynical and pretentious writer with dreary, depressing stories is the perfect guy to write a comic to appeal to fans of a misanthropic, cynical and pretentious movie with a dreary, depressing story. Kudos to Dan Didio for this creative choice.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

December 16, 2008 at 7:15 pm

After all, look what happened to the New X-men with Morrison/Quitely.

I’d blame the editors for that one – it’s like they didn’t know Quietly would be taking his time… despite evidence from his last book The Authority that that’s what he would be doing.
If the editor had planned a little better, like they did by the end of the book, they could have lined up a bunch of artists ready for each arc – meaning you don’t end up with rushed books or destroying Igor Kordey’s career and you get the extra sales spike of a new artist every few issues.

* I eagerly await being called a mistaken idiot by fans of Azzarello. Maybe the next guy can work in something about me molesting children while they’re at it.

You child molesting idiot!!!

Nah, I can get why people didn’t like it – I thought it was ridiculously good, it just fell right apart in those last twenty pages… like dramatically fell apart… like they went ‘oh shit, we’re out of space, time to wrap it up’.
I would’ve liked to have seen more of Azz’s Gotham – maybe a series of OGN’s about Johnny’s rise and eventual fall in the criminal world of Gotham.

DanLarkin seyz:

“I just don’t get people who would rather have Tony Daniel monthly than Frank Quitely whenever he damn well pleases.”

I would probably rather have monthly Grant Morrison scripts than 8 Grant Morrison/Quitely comics a year. I suppose that doesn’t really answer your question though.

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 16, 2008 at 11:41 pm

I’d rather have Quitely 8 times a year, yes, but because that’s the frequency he’s going to produce work, he probably shouldn’t be the artist on anything that must be solicited before completion. The single-issue comics from the major publishers can’t be “whenever done” art comics for all sorts of very practical business reasons, not least being that more money is made and more readers retained when Batman comes out monthly.

Ideally, the journeyman stuff — which sells, make no mistake — can subsidize the production of the super-quality stuff in the shorter term. Longer term, it might be possible to abandon the direct market and the idea of the monthly 22-page feature in favor of the model used elsewhere in fiction publishing.

But yeah, DC would rather sell 12 Batman issues a year without Frank Quitely, and most comic-store patrons would rather get their fix on time than hold out for artists who take their time to make the quality happen. That’s true in virtually every other medium, too, from TV — the short-season HBO and Showtime stuff makes up the minority of produced TV even though it makes up the majority of critically-acclaimed TV. The majority of what’s produced and the stuff that usually wins in the ratings is the grind of 22 and 24-episode seasons for syndication purposes. (The Sopranos was the big exception to this rule; it creamed network shows regularly despite being on a premium channel.)

Hell, publishers do this too: the romance and legal potboiler divisions are what allow the art novels to be published, just as the summer blockbusters and the Epic Movie sorts of things are part of what what allow studios to gamble on Oscar bait and the arthouse imprint’s production.

The plan isn’t “5 issues of Morrison Quitely OR 12 issues of Morrison Daniels,” or at least it shouldn’t be. The real idea should be “5 issues of Morrison Quitely for the bookstores and the critics, 12 issues of Someguy and Daniels for the accountants and the regular readers.”

It’d be nice if the only things that ever were published were ambitious works with critically-defensible and laudable creators, all of them given all the time they need to finish the work as they would have it done. It’d be wonderful if Mitchell Hurwitz got to run with Arrested Development as long as he liked and the network executives refused to air Two and a Half Men on the grounds that it’s lazy and formulaic crap. But that will simply never happen outside, say, a patronage system.

Arguments about publishing delays, moaning about superheroes dominating the direct market, and whinging about fanboys who put RPG stats and continuity trivia above pure storytelling and masterful technique is the comics world’s version of the devil’s bargain art makes with commerce in every other remotely popular medium. The alternative is to see comics as marginalized and rarefied as the theatre or fine painting in the contemporary world. To argue that artists who are not Hitch, or Quitely, or whoever should be paid no heed is the comics world’s equivalent of the movie critic who bemoans the existence of the latest shite comedy as if its absence would force everyone to watch nothing but masterpieces. More likely, a ciniplex only showing the cream of the crop would mean almost no one besides the critics themselves would go to the movies on a Saturday afternoon, and that only for the few weeks before the ciniplexes closed.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

December 17, 2008 at 12:51 am

To argue that artists who are not Hitch, or Quitely, or whoever should be paid no heed is the comics world’s equivalent of the movie critic who bemoans the existence of the latest shite comedy as if its absence would force everyone to watch nothing but masterpieces.

As someone who does that regularly, that’s just our way of saying ‘Oh my god, you’re all a bunch of fucking morons for liking this, for the love of god, why do you fear substance, and prefer a story told the way a ten year old tells a story, I hope you all die, I hate you’, but y’know, idiots never liked their idiocy pointed out to them, so we blame the people who feed them.

“I just don’t get the uproar over late books. Is your goal to read a good comic, or to read a comic every month?”

Who say we can’t have both? Why does it have to be one or the other? If a creator, whoever he or she is, can’t pull off a monthly title, then don’t hire them for that title. I like what they did in the later part of Morrison’s NWM run, having a different artist for each story arc.

This isn’t a problem if it’s a stand-alone title like All Star Superman, but if it’s part of a larger tapestry, it can be a big problem (ie, Astonishing X-men).

Wow, all this debate.

Am I the only one who thinks that Quitely’s probably only doing the opening story arc?

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 17, 2008 at 7:53 am

Oh, I know, Funky, I know. Trust me, I’d rather have nothing but the very, very best…albeit that none of us would probably agree on what the very best is, of course. I’m just saying that the ratio of mediocrity to brilliance in any commercially sold art form is going to be fairly high no matter how much brilliance is produced.

Now who wants to join me in a hearty laugh as we all remember Alan Moore singing the Little Lulu theme song on The Simpsons?

Oh Little Lulu
I love You-lu
Just the same.

(Now there’s a springboard for jokes about child-molesting idiots!)

Omar, you seem like a mistaken idiot about the Joker OGN but maybe you just didn’t read it properly because you were busy molesting children.

I keed, I keed ;)

You’re right about the namecalling, the level of antagonism in this thread stopped me from bothering to post anything.

“Who say we can’t have both? Why does it have to be one or the other?”

Because most good artists require more time than most bad aritsts. It’s not like that’s a choice any of us make. It’s just the way that it’s been proven to work. So, accept how it is and stop complaining that things aren’t ideal. It’s not that big of a deal, really.

And if you’re really stuck on reading the issues in equal periodical succession, buy them in trade.

Anyone think Quietly might not actually be drawing the regular Batman title? Its not like the guy has a spotless track record for keeping a monthly schedule. Basically everything hes ever done in a monthly book has ended up late or fallen prey to fill-ins. What he does have is critical (and commercial?) kudos thanks to All-Star Superman, something he and Morrison took their sweet sweet time on. Surely no right minded editor, executive editor, hell anybody, would hire him to shovel out 12 issues of the regular Batman title in a year?

But how about this…

Who’s for a new, ‘in-but-out-of-continuity’ Batman title. And when I say that I don’t mean the po-faced grimngritty of Legends of the Dark Knight, the “8-issues in its become interchangable with all the regular titles” of Shadow of the Bat, neither the ‘why was this even published?’ irrelevance of Batman Confidential, but dayglo psychadelic Morrison telling any sort of Batman story he likes. Call it Batman – The Black Casebook. Just crazy-ape shit thats published whenever they finish one. And let it run forever…

Oh yes, it will be “monthly”. Like ASS was “monthly”. Like you get 12 issues in what? 2 and a half years? But who cares? Like everybody above me says, you got to be patient for the good stuff…

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

December 17, 2008 at 3:59 pm

And if you’re really stuck on reading the issues in equal periodical succession, buy them in trade.

Exactly the trade-off isn’t between “letting” Frank Quitely get by with “just” 8 issues per year versus making Frank Quitely do 12 issues of Batman a year in the parallel universe where that could possibly happen.

There is, however, a possible but as-yet unperformed trade-off between buying the irregularly published Batman book by the top-end team or the other, spot-on monthly cash-cow Batman title by, I dunno, Joe Average and Billy Journeyman. It’s not as if the existence of a regular but thoroughly mediocre Batman comic precludes the very existence of an irregular critics’ choice Batman comic, is it?

“Who’s for a new, ‘in-but-out-of-continuity’ Batman title.”

Me, me, me!

Hypertime!

Only problem I have with in-but-of-continuity is the fallout: where editors take borderline insane Morrison concepts and put them to poor use in regular continuity. Like New X-Men.

Oh, wait, you mean a sort of Black Dossier, Tales of the Batman thing. Okay. Different from what I was talking about.

LOL 8 issues of Quitely for year.
The man is slow as a worm if not more ,4 at most.

Btw calling someone idiot b/c he dont like a comic you liked is stupid.
Opinions are like asses everyone have one.

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