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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 24

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we end our special Tear-Jerker Week of cool comic book moments!

Today’s “tear jerker” moment comes from a classic Alan Moore Superman story (the fourth of I guess four tear jerking moments from this story).

Enjoy!

To recap, we’re looking at the classic Alan Moore/Curt Swan “Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?” storyline that told the “final” Superman story before the Byrne “Man of Steel” reboot.

The first two days were on the first part, Superman (Vol. 1) #423, which was by Moore, Swan and inker George Perez. Yesterday we began the second part, Action Comics #583, which was by Moore, Swan and inker Kurt Schaffenberger.

When we left our heroes, Lex Luthor fought off the control of Brainiac long enough for him to beg Lana Lang to kill him. She kills Luthor, but then she is, in turn, killed by the Legion of Super-Villains. Jimmy Olsen is about to disable the force field keeping all of the rest of Earth’s superheroes out of the battle, but he is killed instead by Brainiac, who is re-animating Luthor’s body (it is awesome – Luthor has a snapped neck but is still walking).

Anyhow, after dropping a nuke on the Fortress, the villains are entering, with the Kryptonite Man being the first to enter.

What happens next is our fourth cool comic book moment from this story!

(Click to enlarge)

Man, talk about interesting book ends for the tear jerker week! Both dying animals. I guess it is true – people always tear up when animals die (cue thoughts back to Old Yeller)!

27 Comments

Was Krypto ever that badass before he died? Damn. And check out the pool of green blood. Ol’ Krypto was not fooling around.

that is the one moment of the whole story that gives me chills every time.. that and superman not being able to be with Krypto when he dies . that and the Kryptonite man learning the hard way not to mess with a super dog. the saddest moment of the whole story

Krypto’s tongue hanging out makes me very sad…. :[

Alright, alright…

I’ll go and buy the Alan Moore DC Universe stories…

Happy now?

“I’m killing you, you stupid animal! Don’t you understand?”

…of course, the animal not only knows that, but he’s the one who knows why he’s attacking anyway.

Alright, alright…

I’ll go and buy the Alan Moore DC Universe stories…

Happy now?

It really took SIX cool comic book moments from that trade to convince you it might be worth a buy? :)

One thing I like about this scene, despite hating the overall story, is how tastefully rendered it all was by Swan, without losing any emotional impact. One of today’s artists would easily have added way more gore and blood than necessary and cheapened it. Swan was a class act.

It really took SIX cool comic book moments from that trade to convince you it might be worth a buy?

FOUR from one story, too! That’s really what swung it… :-)

To be honest it’s always been one of those books that I looked at as a sort of hodge-podge of pieces that they couldn’t compile elsewhere… Plus I’ve already got Killing Joke, but sod it!

Thanks for persuading me, Brian!

rassin’ frassin no-good Cronin makin’ me go back on a Saturday and reread the tearjerkingest story in my whole consarn collection…

So if you had to pick one moment, was it the “aaaooooooo”?

Wow, good question.

It is either the cry or the next panel, where we hear that Superman was not even there to see his dead dog.

Vincent Paul Bartilucci

January 24, 2009 at 7:08 pm

To me, this is THE scene from” Whatever Happened to …” – the scene that always pops into my head when I think about this story.

Wha? So, this classic story just kills everybody off? I get the idea of wrapping it up, but, jeez…

On the other hand Krypto freakin’ killing that green dude is just awesome! :)

I wonder how many copies of the Alan Moore DC universe trade have sold since the year of cool comic book moments started…
I know I’m buying it on monday : )

I’ve probably read more comics drawn by Curt Swan than any other artist. (Except maybe Jim Aparo.) It’s easy to forget how powerful Swan can be. When you say Superman, the image that pops into my head is still Curt Swan’s.

One of the very first comic book panels that I remember really rocking me was when Swan drew the Legion. They had been sent to the Space Stalag or something and the girls were forced to *gasp* wash dishes! There was a shot of Dream Girl brushing the hair back from her forehead with the back of her hand. It broke my heart.

It’s as if Swan was consciously trying to make DC sorry they were going to replace him as the artist on Superman. He sure made me sorry.

My own second-favorite moment (the Lana / Jimmy scene is my first) is the aftermath of Toyman and the Prankster having revealed his secret identity.

I already have the Alan Moore Omnibus trade, but these last few cool moments have reminded me that it’s been far too long since I sat down and enjoyed it. Say what you will about Moore, but he could craft some amazing stories with DC’s characters.

I don’t know if this one has been mentioned, or will be, but my favorite ‘Cool Moment’ of not only Superman, but of all comics, comes from Moore and Gibbons’ “For The Man Who Has Everything.” For anybody who knows the story, they’ll know instantly what I’m referring to when I sum it up:

One panel. One word. “BURN.”

I still get chills up my spine everytime I read that moment…

What about the heart-rending (literally!) death of Myxy? *sniff*
You forgot the other “last” Superman story, the Rick Vietch Phantom Zone story. Did that end with Argo City, or was that in another issue?
(Great as this story was, I think each issue you select should have only one entry. It makes commenting much easier and frees up space for other issues. Maybe save your longer columns, like this one would be, for the weekends, when people tend not to surf.)

Yeah, actually Krypto was pretty badass pre-Crisis. He had average human intelligence and DC gave him some pretty great adventures in the 70′s in Superman Family.

Ha ha, thanks Ted. I just got the chance to go back and look through the cool moments I had missed and saw the “Burn” moment already included. Nice to see I’m not the only one that loves that scene.

Only scene in any comic book in over 40 years of reading that made me cry.

I still just got a shudder again reading it here.

Good dog, Krypto. Good dog!

Yeah, actually Krypto was pretty badass pre-Crisis. He had average human intelligence and DC gave him some pretty great adventures in the 70’s in Superman Family.

I always loved those Krypto stories as a little kid.

Like most of the other posters, this was THE moment for me. Byrne almost immediately recycled very similar versions of Pete, Lana and Jimmy in “The Man of Steel’. Sadly, that Krypto has never been seen again. (Well, at least by me…) When Alan Moore killed Krypto, he stayed dead.

More importantly, the dog stayed in character. In every story that I ever read, he was constantly worried about pleasing Superman. It was pretty much his sole motivation. So, it is natural that he would take it to the point of being willing to die for him.

Something about that is so sad and touching.

I loved the Brainiac-reanimated Luthor, too! So scary!

And I cried at Krypto’s death, too. Even though I read this story decades after it came out and knew Krypto would reappear in the Byrne canon, his death here was just so touching.

What does this have to do with Old Yeller? It said that it was about Old Yeller comics. This is so stupid!

You’ve been misinformed; the article is not meant to be ABOUT Old Yeller comics. (How and where did you get that impression? It turning up in a Google search on “Old Yeller” and “comics” perhaps? What we have here is a comics blog entry on a comics web-site that mentions Old Yeller. It’s not unreasonable that it turn up in such a search. But search results are not guaranteed to be what you hope they are, and a necessary condition for your disappointment with this page is your own unreasonable apparent expectation that they are so guaranteed. The page isn’t stupid… Anyway, enough Stoic philosophy)

In case you missed it, the emotional effect of the extracted sequence is compared in passing to that of Old Yeller:

“I guess it is true – people always tear up when animals die (cue thoughts back to Old Yeller)!”

“One of today’s artists would easily have added way more gore and blood than necessary and cheapened it. Swan was a class act.”

Amen.

Actually, Brian, Jimmy did disable the machine producing the Force Field, but not the Field itself, before he is killed…don’t want to spoil it for anyone who hasn’t read the series yet, but that does make sense if you’ve read the story…

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