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A Month of Writing Stars – Stuart Moore

Every day this month I’m going to feature a current comic book writing “star,” someone who I think is a very good writer.

I’m mostly going to try to keep from the biggest names as much as possible, because, really, do I need to talk more about the awesomeness of Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman and Warren Ellis?

Here is the archive of previously featured writers.

Today we look at a great writer who was an incredible editor.

Enjoy!

Stuart Moore first came to my attention, as I imagine was the case for many other readers out there, as an editor. He was an acclaimed editor at Vertigo Comics (He edited Flex Mentallo, Preacher and Transmetropolitan…I mean, damn, do I really need to explain any further? Talk about a freakin’ resume!) who Joe Quesada managed to finagle to come over to Marvel Comics, where Moore continued his great work with some of the top comic book talent out there to create some impressive comics for Marvel, as well.

Moore eventually decided to go full-time as a freelance writer, and he has been doing quite a job at it, although with a bit of a lower profile than back when he was an editor.

He had a short run on Firestorm that I quite enjoyed (it introduced the character of Gehenna, who is still a major part of the Firestorm book)…

but that was about it as far as major runs on books go.

Mostly everything else he has done for DC and Marvel has been along the lines of one-shots and fill-in arcs, which is a shame, as he has shown a real eye for both characterization as well as intriguing plots that get the most out of his characters’ personalities.

Perhaps his most impressive skill remains his great eye for talent. If you look at the artists who Moore works with on a lot of these projects, he has a real knack for working with great artists.

He did Lone for Dark Horse with a young Jerome Opeña.

His most famous Marvel work may be his one-shot stories with the great C.P. Smith as artist (he is soon to do a Wolverine: Noir mini-series with Smith again)…

He is doing a creator owned series with the highly underrated Jon Proctor called Shadrach Stone, which Moore has a great description of:

SHADRACH STONE is a paranormal adventure story, a sociopolitical allegory, and an occasionally nasty character drama. But mostly, it’s about lies. The lies we tell ourselves to get through the day; the lies our leaders tell us so we’ll fall in line. The lies that become our accepted truths, and the ones that flare and turn to ash before the pure light of truth.

I look forward to Moore projects, but honestly, I hope more of them in the future are closer to Sharach Stone than, say, a placeholder arc on Iron Man. He has the talent to be a major creative force at Marvel, DC, wherever. He just needs the opportunity (which, of course, is always the rub).

Here is his blog.

And here is a workblog for Sharach Stone.

13 Comments

Stuart Moore is one of those writers who never blows me away, but is never altogether bad either.

Hurray for Stuart Moore’s Firestorm — that was a really fun book.

Notice how only two of the covers actually credit him as “STUART MOORE”??

Not to belittle him in any way, rather the companies that produce the comics, but Marvel and DC seem to use this little gimmick every now and then… “Just put ‘Moore’ on the cover – people will think it’s ALAN MOORE and we’ll sell more before they realise it…” That works for Stuart, Terry, Tony and more…

It’s not just the Moores though, there have been few other similar surnames where the cynical part of me reckons that they dropped the first name for sales purposes…

To sum up though, I really like Stuart Moore’s work too, just wish the Publishers would credit people properly on the covers…

I’m tempted to pick up Wolverine: Noir, since I like the Moore/C.P. Smith pairing.

Plus, Smith’s style seems like a natural fit for the Noir line, and his art is, at the very least, always interesting.

So, yeah, that’s a definite maybe.

Huh, I got a number of gap filling issues of Firestorm in an auction purchase recently, so i might have to look at the Moore firestorm run.

That Wolverine issue was my first Wolverine book. I love his work. His arc on Iron Man was also a great read.
@Blackjack: How often is the first name printed, anyway? Most of my books list only the last names on the front.

@Dalarsco: I know. That’s my point… At first glance, you have no idea which Moore is involved (or Miller, Lee, Jones, Smith, etc.) For a browser in a comic shop where most issues are bagged on the shelf, you can’t flick it open to find out either…
It’s not a problem I have all the time, but I do think it’s an unnecessary confusion that could be avoided by using full names, even if they reduced the font size, to fit them in the same space…
I just think that Marvel and DC in particular use it as a gimmick to bump up sales on some titles…

And I know, that there were long periods when the writers and artists weren’t credited on the covers at all…

Ok, that makes sense. I thought you were talking about them specifically leaving off the first names with someone like Moore as a special case specifically to fool people, not that they should use both names as standard practice. That makes perfect sense.

It’s not just the Moores though, there have been few other similar surnames where the cynical part of me reckons that they dropped the first name for sales purposes…

Yeah – like those “Morrison” issues of The Authority…

Which was particulary clever, as Grant Morrison had allegedly helped Millar out earlier, it was perfectly feasible that it was Grant and not Robbie Morrison writing… Though I did notice that the two issues (from the aborted volume with Gene Ha) that WERE written by Grant Morrison used full names…

This was a total shock. Thanks guys, and especially thank you, Brian. See you at the NY con — FYI, I’ll be at the Penny-Farthing Press booth on Friday and Saturday, 2:00 to 3:00 each day.

It’s not just the Moores though, there have been few other similar surnames where the cynical part of me reckons that they dropped the first name for sales purposes…

Yeah – like those “Morrison” issues of The Authority…

Yeah, “Turner” was involved in them too. I fell for it.

This was a total shock. Thanks guys, and especially thank you, Brian. See you at the NY con — FYI, I’ll be at the Penny-Farthing Press booth on Friday and Saturday, 2:00 to 3:00 each day.

No problema, Stuart – keep up the good work!

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