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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 27

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we look at the first sign that Quantum and Woody was different than most comic books, from the first two pages of #1!

Enjoy!

Quantum and Woody was written by Christopher Priest and drawn (well, almost every issue, at least) by M.D. Bright.

It was a highly amusing story about two former friends who ended up back in each other’s life after years apart and through a shared bond (and by shared, I mean they had to make contact with each other every 24 hours or they would die) they decided to become crimefighters together.

While this is a stretch for a “moment,” it is basically one extended moment, I think.

The book was notable in its use of flashbacks (with titles) to give background on the characters as the main story proceeded (even the main story would be told out of sequence often).

The very first two pages of the first issue of the book were a flashback to when Quantum (Eric) and Woody (Woody) were young boys and it immediately establishes both their relationship and personalities as well as the tone for the entire series – right off the bat you knew that the book was going to be both funny AND a bit on the edgy side.

So here it is, courtesy of the Dynamic Duo of Christopher Priest and M.D. Bright.

Like all other books that I’m likely to use more than one moment from, I’d appreciate it if you refrained from commenting about other good Quantum and Woody moments, because there’s a very good chance I’ll be using them in the future! So please keep it specific to this scene or general about the series as a whole! Thanks!

14 Comments

Uau! Why haven’t I heard about this before?

Tell me more about this series

Quantum and Woody was a great great series! However I can not talk about it with out spoiling something, so I won’t. What I will say is I think Christopher Priest had the misfortune of following Joe Kelly’s run on Deadpool. I’m not sure if it was that his sense of humor classed with Kelly’s too much or fans didn’t like the new direction or what, but his run was far too short. His run on the funny book was the best it ever saw. To me it felt very akin to Gail Simone’s later run on it. Not to mention his great take on Black Panther around this time too!

I never quite got this series. Bright’s artwork had a lot to do with it; I really don’t like it. And I guess the sense of humor doesn’t match up with mine. I know a lot of people loved it . . .maybe seeing cool moments will make me want to check it out.

Those jokes were pretty funny. The chemistry is immediately apparent. And as usual, I love Mark Bright’s art. I’ve loved it since his Iron Man days. I never tried this book.

The mention about flashbacks worries me though. Unlike how well Brubaker uses them without ever being confusing, Priest seems to use them just to use them because he feels nonsequential storytelling seems more complex and mature than linear, and he often just ends up being confusing. At least that was my Black Panther experience,

Tom Fitzpatrick

January 28, 2009 at 5:46 am

I had forgotten about that dog moment, whew, I have a soft spot for dogs, and reading about that would have bothered me.

What bothers me even more is that Priest and Bright STILL haven’t filled in the missing issues #22-31, and 33-on.

What the hell is somebody waiting for? “An engraved invitation?”

I believe the Quantum and Woody rights got all screwed up by the Acclaim-buying-Valiant thing, and then the Acclaim-declaring-bankruptcy thing.

I wasn’t a big fan of Jim Shooter, but a huge Gold Key hero fan. I picked up Turok, Solar and Magnus but decided to stay away from the rest of the line. Best decision I ever made. After the comic bust, I picked up almost every other issue published by Valiant (and Acclaim) in quarter boxes. Archer & Armstrong, Quantum & Woody and most of the other titles were fresh and quality stuff. I spent the better part of a summer reading boxes of Valiants that cost me next to nothing. Same goes for the Milestone and Marvel’s “new universe” stuff. Quality reads you could buy for a quarter. It will forever be my opinion that the junk Image put out at the time ruined the market for the quality start-ups.

THIS BOOK ROCKS!!! Every issue has at least 3-4 scenes just like this one. Funny as kaka yet Priest never forgot he was telling a STORY with CHARACTERS we were supposed to CARE about. I know it had to be hard to pick just one scene from this series. I’m surprised you didn’t pick one with Woody’s pet, HAEDUS (Heavily Armored Espionage Deadly Uber-Sheep). I still have the Goat Immovable Action Figure – wih fully adjustable cape of course.

THIS BOOK ROCKS!!! Every issue has at least 3-4 scenes just like this one. Funny as kaka yet Priest never forgot he was telling a STORY with CHARACTERS we were supposed to CARE about. I know it had to be hard to pick just one scene from this series. I’m surprised you didn’t pick one with Woody’s pet, HAEDUS (Heavily Armored Espionage Deadly Uber-Sheep). I still the Goat Immovable Action Figure – wih fully adjustable cape of course.

Not a fan of the art, but that was a pretty cool “comic book moment”.

Where are they now? I loved Bright’s run on Green Lantern (until Ron Marz ruined it) and Priest did a great Ray mini series…

Granted, I’ve never read this book before, but come on, that dialogue/situation is pretty contrived. It screams out “it’s the ’90s! I just watched ‘Clerks!’ Here’s a comic book!”

I didn’t actually think it was that funny.

I mean like, it wasn’t UNfunny, just nothing that’d make me particularly want to keep reading.

If a white writer wrote that, he’d be a racist. When Priest does it, it’s comedy. Another thing about America I could never quite figure out.

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