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CSBG Archive

Comics Are Awesome: Part 20

Why yes, that would be quite unexpected.

24 Comments

I am incredibly intrigued to read this issue to find out how, what, and why. Thank God for DC Silver Age cover goodness.

Although I would prefer if my red car was green.

I too need to know. What if that happens in our neighborhoods. How would we be able to cope?

There must be spoilers somewhere.

That is really intriguing. I wish you’d discuss the plots within these books sometimes, I’m really curious as to why everything changed color in the story. Anyone know?

The ironic ending has to be when the world is saved and/or ruled by somebody colorblind.

The Skittles factory had a meltdown. This was well before

Chernobyll

But why… WHY?!

^^The second “Why?” really makes the cover.

The issue beg for A Morrison sequel. Preferable a universe wide DC event. Death of the Red Lanterns maybe?

How will this change affect comedian Red Green? TELL ME!

I love how the cover makes it seem like a big deal. Who cares if everything red turns to green? You change the “go” signal on a traffic light, and you’re good to go!

So the four color printing offset was wrong again. Was this issue a dig at DC’s cost cutting?

The best part is that their skin turns green, too. That’s an attention to detail that I don’t expect from comics of the time.

“Oh shit, what the FUCK just happened to my Skittles?!?”

Something tells me this would be the most confusing “Showcase Presents” reprint ever.

“Red’s turning to green, huh? Guess I’ll take your word for it.”

So we get all up in Flash’s grill for going many times faster than the speed of light but no-one minds this violating the first law of thermodynamics. Interesting.

So we get all up in Flash’s grill for going many times faster than the speed of light but no-one minds this violating the first law of thermodynamics. Interesting.

It’s Silver Age DC. It’s written for kids, it doesn’t take itself too seriously and it’s supposed to be retarded. So it gets a pass.

I just don’t see why we can’t just give everything a pass, at least on the finer points of scientific theory.

My personal rule of thumb is this: I only take a scientific scene in a comic book as seriously as the writer seems to be taking it. If a comic is blatantly playing fast and loose with science in an effort to have a fun story, I treat it as such. If a writer seems to be trying to take the science really seriously and is getting ultraspecific and trying to incorporate real life concepts and computations in excruciating detail, then I’ll judge him on the same level I feel he’s writing at.

I have the same rule with continuity, if a writer is obviously playing fast and loose with continuity, I won’t judge a continuity mistake as harshly. If it’s a Kurt Busiek book where excruciating detail to continuity is evident;y being attempted, I’d nitpick on continuity more closely.

I guess the question then is how we define ‘ultraspecific’.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

February 23, 2009 at 12:07 am

How that issue wasn’t the best selling comic of all time, I’ll never understand.

How could anyone walk past that and not pick it up to see what happened/what it’s about etc?

Possibly my most favourite cover ever.

It appeals to me on the same level, yet for the opposite reason, as the ‘What’s going on in the locked room’ cover.

Part of me hopes the protagonist of this story was colorblind, and he’s just wandering around in a world turned upside-down– when he’s been living that life all along.

Part of me hopes the protagonist of this story was colorblind, and he’s just wandering around in a world turned upside-down– when he’s been living that life all along.

Crap, I was hoping you actually read these things. So I guess there’s no one here who knows the answer. :(

[...] Are Awesome, in dem er jeweils ein besonders abstruses aber ebenso wundervolles Cover postet. Vor ein paar Tagen zum Beispiel [...]

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