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CSBG Archive

Final Crisis FAQ

Here it is!

I’m responding to the questions in the order that they were asked.

If you would prefer a more stream-lined look at Final Crisis, chronologically from issue to issue, I have a “Cliffs Notes” of sorts here that is a bit more straightforward.

Otherwise, enjoy!

Adam Jones asked:

Was that exiled Monitor reawoken as that black kid who worked at the burger joint? Or was that supposed to be Orion? Was Orion even reborn at all?

Yes, that was the Monitor.

No, Orion was not reborn in Final Crisis. He may still be reborn in the future, but not as of yet.

Also, in the first issue we saw a Green Lantern construct as a monkey with cymbals (with a big HAHAHAH!), did they ever reveal who did that attack on John Stewart? Was it that Alpha Lantern Granny Goodness hid in, or was it just forgotten? I always thought it was supposed to be the Joker, who got his hands on a power ring, but hey, that’s why I don’t write comics.

It was the Alpha Lantern. This is shown later in the same issue when we see the imprint of John’s ring on her hand.

Matt asked:

How did FC actually tie into Death of the New Gods? The two events seemed to cover the same events (such as the death of Orion) but in vastly different ways.

Of the two depictions of the downfall of the New Gods (Countdown and the Death of the New Gods), Jim Starlin came closer to what Grant Morrison wanted to achieve, but yeah, there were still definite contradictions.

This came as a natural consequence of Starlin writing his series before Morrison wrote his.

Morrison had a few plot points he wanted established for Final Crisis (well, honestly, he likely did not even “want” them established, it was more a “Grant, what plot points can we establish so that we can honestly call this a prelude to Final Crisis?”), and only a few of them were actually done according to his specifications. The Death of the New Gods didn’t exactly work, but Starlin really came as close as anyone did with his take.

I believe Morrison’s take on it is that the Death of the New Gods is an approximation of the “war of the heavens” that leads into Final Crisis, and therefore, any such battle would be incomprehensible to regular people, which explains why there were different takes on it. That’s a clever enough solution.

Why couldn’t the Guardians simply wave a finger and shut down Boodika the Alpha Lantern from getting anywhere near the Central Power Battery? We’ve seen them shut down power rings before, should be no reason they could not do it (or something similar) this time around.

That was why they made a big point of them being “Alpha Lanterns.” The same precautions were not taken against the Alpha Lanterns, because the whole POINT of Alpha Lanterns was that they were infallible.

In the future, I presume they will not make that same mistake again.

Nick Marino asked:

why was Shilo Norman suddenly colored as Caucasian in some pages of Final Crisis #6? mistake or actual story reasoning? it’s Morrison here so I wouldn’t put it past him…

I’m going with mistake.

You could make some argument for the sigil having some odd effect upon him, but I think mistake is more likely. I suppose we’ll find out for sure in the hardcover.

EDITED TO ADD: Yeah, it was a mistake. Dan Didio has said as much, and it will be corrected in the hardcover.

can the events in Final Crisis be directly linked to the Mister Miracle mini? i read that back when it came out, and i understood it (somewhat!) for what it was. then i read the first issue of FC and i didn’t necessarily see how they connected to each other.

Yes, what happened was that after the Death of the New Gods, Darkseid fell through time (in an attempt to escape death) and the events of the Mister Miracle mini-series took place, including introducing the human disguises for Darkseid and his cronies (note they are not alive, in the typical sense of the world – Morrison is going under the assumption that, as established by Jack Kirby, that Darkseid can basically recreate his cronies just based on his memories of them – so view his cronies almost as an extension of Darkseid’s will rather than “Darkseid and a bunch of other evil New Gods escaped death”).

is there any connection between the New Gods appearance in the final issues of Firestorm and their actions in FC?

No.

okay, wait, so Batman did die… he didn’t die… OKAY, what is his status as can best be described RIGHT NOW.

Lost in time and space.

Where and when is unknown.

is there any significance to the strip club we see in the ending of FC #1? (i feel like this one might be obvious but i just can’t remember…)

Do you mean the ending of Final Crisis #2?

If so, it was just as it was explained in the comic. That was where Barry Allen and Jay Garrick first met (as good a place for Barry to return as any, right?), but it was once a community center and is now a strip club, likely intended by Morrison as a statement about the whole “grim and gritty” nature of the DC Universe that Final Crisis is intended to counteract.

P_B asked:

I’d like to see an attempt at tracing Superman chronologically through the whole thing.

It depends on whether he is taken to the future by the Legion once or twice, and apparently Morrison has confirmed that it is just the once.

So in that case, it is:

Final Crisis #1-3 – Takes part in some Justice League stuff, is here for the death of the Martian Manhunter, gives a speech at the funeral of the Martian Manhunter. The Daily Planet blows up and Lois gravely injured.

Superman Beyond #1-2 – He goes off on his multiverse mission and returns and heals Lois, returns to Earth.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #1-5 – He returns just in time to be taken into the future.

Final Crisis #4-most of 6 – His adventures in the Legion of Three Worlds mini-series.

Final Crisis end of #end of 6-7 – Back on Earth and directly involved in the end of Final Crisis.

David asked:

The story starts with Darkseid’s fall to Earth after a war in heaven. What happened there?

The Fourth World was intended to be destroyed for the sake of the Fifth World. There was a war in heaven (one approximation of this was the events in Jim Starlin’s The Death of the New Gods mini-series) that ended up with Orion being the last god standing. Darkseid, however, could not abide by this, so he escaped by falling to Earth through time and space to the Seven Soldiers: Mister Miracle mini-series. Since that point, he had been planning to take over Earth. It was all part of his plan to avoid the Fifth World ever coming about, for as long as he was still around, it could not exist. So he figured if he could not rule the Fourth World, he’d rule Earth instead.

Craig B. asked:

Who the heck was Libra?

Basically just an agent of Darkseid’s on Earth.

What was the relationship between the Darkseid story that took up most of the series and the Mandrakk story that took up the Superman Beyond side-series and the last half of the last issue of the main series?

The machinations of Darkseid cause a breakdown of the multiverse, allowing Mandrakk’s story to take place.

Did Hawkman and Hawkgirl die? Why? What were they doing?

Yes, they died. In an attempt to save people, Checkmate created a dimensional tunnel between universes. It began breaking down, and Lord Eye tried to close it, which would have killed all the people still in the tunnel. The Hawks blew it up, but died in the explosion that destroyed it. Luckily, Mister Miracle was able to save the remaining folks with a last second Boom Tube. Interestingly enough, Hawkman’s fiery death was actually foretold in last year’s Hawkman Special by Jim Starlin. Odd that that special actually ended up being tying into Final Crisis like that.

What was going on with the Atoms? What were they doing? Did it work? What did it do?

They created the pathway that the aforementioned dimensional tunnel used.

It worked for a while, before it collapsed as the multiverse was suffering through way too much turmoil to hold up.

Why is the Legion of 3 Worlds series still going, and what is its connection to the main series?

It’s still going mostly because it really is NOT connected to the main series in any significant fashion, so it is not on the same deadline as the main series.

What was the point of the whole Question and Spectre side series? What exactly did any of that accomplish?

For Final Crisis, nothing of note. But Greg Rucka got a lot of good work with some characters he liked done.

Neal K. asked:

When Superman used the Miracle Machine to wish the world back into existence, why didn’t he wish for the fallen heroes such as Martian Manhunter, Batman (at least Superman believed him to be dead), etc. to be resurrected, or to make any other perfecting changes to the world? Did it have to do with Superman’s own internal limitations (i.e. he thought that those kind of changes were things he should not mess around with), or with external limitations of the Miracle Machine’s capacity?

The former (Superman’s own internal limitations).

Will asked:

Final Crisis was supposed be about Darkseid’s fall and rebirth and the transition of the universe from the Fourth World to the Fifth World. If that’s the case, who is Mandrakk the Dark Monitor and why did he show up in Superman Beyond & FC #7? What was his part in the story?

Mandrakk the Dark Monitor was able to make his move because Darkseid caused great turmoil in the multiverse due to his refusal to go away and allow the Fifth World to take place. Darkseid’s machinations gave Mandrakk his opening.

Dave asked:

Seriously, why did Shilo Norman a turn into a white man for issues #4-6?

As mentioned earlier, until I hear otherwise, I’m going with “coloring mistake.”

Verdammt asked:

If Batman is not dead and stuck in time/somewhere in the multiverse, then whose charred corpse was Superman holding? (This may be explained if we get a concise explanation of just what it is the Omega Sanction does and does not do.)

The great thing about the Omega Sanction is that there is no precise explanation for what it does and does not do, so anything pretty much goes for it, particularly when you add in the fact that Darkseid was shot by Batman before the beams hit Batman – who knows what kind of odd effect that would have on the effects of the beam? I imagine we’ll get more specific answers when Morrison returns to Batman in June.

That said, in extremely general terms, the Omega Sanction transports people across time and space.

10FootBongz asked:

How about an arts credit listing (who drew which pages)?

Okay, I could be off on a few pages here and there, but I think this is basically all correct…

Issues #1-3 – All J.G. Jones

Issue #4 – Carlos Pacheco drew the straight superhero scenes while JG Jones got the darker stuff with Darkseid and the Flashes.

Issue #5 – Pacheco drew the opening with the Green Lanterns and the two-page spread of the heroes charging. Marco Rudy drew most of the last pages of the book, including Darkseid taking control of the three billion humans. JG Jones drew the rest.

Issue #6 – Opens with a couple of Pacheco pages, then Rudy draws most of the issue, except for a few major scenes drawn by JG Jones, namely the Supergirl/Mary Marvel fight, the Talky Tawny fight, the Flashes attack Darkseid and the Batman/Darkseid fight. Closes with a few Doug Mahnke pages.

Issue #7 – All Doug Mahnke, although with a gazillion different inkers.

Da Fug asked:

What’s going on with the Bruce Wayne situation? I assume that the world does not know Batman is dead thus The Battle for the Cowl in which a secret replacement is chosen. But what about Bruce Wayne? Is Bruce dead with public acknowledgment and funeral? Missing? Gone to Europe?

The world is beginning to suspect Batman is dead, which leads into Battle for the Cowl.

As for Bruce Wayne, currently, Hush looks just like Bruce Wayne and has been seen around since Batman died, so that should assuage any “Hey, wait a sec…is Bruce Wayne Batman?” rumors. But yeah, I think they’re likely going with “Bruce Wayne is on vacation somewhere he can’t be reached,” but that will be addressed for sure in Battle for the Cowl, I presume.

Billy F. asked:

What finally caused the Justifiers to be released from Darkseid’s control? Luthor? Metron’s sigil being placed on Earth by Ray?

Some from Ray, the rest from Wonder Woman using her lasso of truth on Darkseid.

Barry Allen releases Iris from the control of anti-life by kissing her. How exactly did this work? Does the antidote to anti-life reside within Barry Allen? The Speed Force? is it love?

A mixture of the second and third options, with a heavy stressing on the third option.

The Eagle Host of the Pax Dei shows up at the end of Final Crisis for the showdown with the Dark Monitor. Was their appearance foreshadowed anywhere, or were they just included to drive home Morrison’s literal usage of a Deus Ex Machina?

More the latter.

Most likely it was a bit of “If this is the end times, then we really ought to get involved.”

Was the fire that Superman found in Metron’s chair some version of the Worlogog from his JLA run?

I see it like this – the Element X Superman finds it not the Worlogog. Howver, the Worlogog might very well have been made out of Element X. We just don’t know.

Who was that ape man that was imprisoned with Nix Uotan and the rubicks cube solver (Metron?) in Darkseid’s lair?

One interesting answer I’ve heard was an experimented on Himon, as Himon was the creator of the motherbox, so it would follow that he would create the motherboxxx that was contained in the Rubik’s Cube, no?

However, Morrison I believe has stated that no New Gods survived (until the Fifth World, of course), so that likely rules Himon out.

That leaves the type-writing monkey from Animal Man as the leader, which is possible enough, as the monkey sure would know about the power of stories, wouldn’t he?

Wouldn’t it be a kick if this was the “origin” of the typewriting monkey from Animal Man? That he was created in Command-D!

In any event, basically it is unknown for sure.

What role was the Spector and the Radiant playing at the end?

Same as the Pax Dei. The end times are coming, so they thought it was time to get involved.

Conor E asked:

What was up with Renee Montoya? I understand that Revelations took place around the gap between issues 3 and 4 of the main series (since we see “evil winning” during that series), but wasn’t she recruited by Checkmate before then, and still hanging out with them after?

This is one of the “time distortions” that are mentioned in Final Crisis, because as you mention, there is not enough time for Montoya to travel around the world the way she does.

Also: Submit and Resist (since I forget which is which). The one with Black Lightning is extremely simple to place, but the one with Mr. Terrific is pretty confusing in regards to the main series.

Resist is between #3 and #4, with the likely argument being “time distortion” for how Terrific is able to get back to Switzerland from Antarctica in the time given between #3 and 4. The OMACs that pop up at the end of RESIST are likely how he GOT back to Switzerland. Note in Final Crisis #7, the OMACs are in Switzerland. So just presume the OMACs got him back but then are off-panel until Final Crisis #7.

Patrick C. asked:

Why were people being “frozen” or whatever was happening with everyone that wasn’t Superman or Supergirl during Final Crisis #7?

The population of Earth was being put into “storage” (via a shrinking ray and cryogenics) while Superman fixed the Earth.

What did Iman say in Final Crisis #7? In fact, how about translations for all the non-english dialogue?

David Uzumeri and Douglad Wolk did translations for Iman.

Here’s David:

In Final Crisis #7:

As far as I can figure, what Iman’s saying is “He’s going to start time, is all I’ve heard. To live in the world with a man like this.”

In Final Crisis #6:

Iman’s dialogue translates to “Something approaches. Like the sound of horses.”

Here’s Douglas:

In Final Crisis #5

His dialogue translates roughly as “What hit me? Ah, $&#*! My armor’s useless. Weighs a ton… what would Superman do…?” (I might be wrong about that last bit.)

What did Ray drawing the Metron symbol on Earth really accomplish?

It saved roughly half of the world’s population from Darkseid’s control. It also might have freed Wonder Woman from Darkseid’s control, which turned out to be a big deal.

Is Dan Turpin dead?

No, just wounded.

What exactly happened to Checkmate, I guess some of the heroes ended up on Earth-51, while others (Mister Terrific and the Hawks died?

Mr. Terrific makes his way to Earth-51. The Hawks die. Checkmate ended up on Earth-51. What they do next will likely be explored in the Final Crisis Aftermath mini-series dealing with them.

Are Ogama and Solomon the same Monitor? Should we just not bring up Countdown in this FAQ?

No, they’re different guys.

You CAN bring up Countdown, but the answer is likely going to be something along the lines of “Morrison did not take into account what happened with Countdown when he wrote Final Crisis, as he was under the impression that he would not have to worry about Countdown contradicting his work. So when it often did, he was not too worried about it. ”

Is Mandrakk the original Monitor from COIE?

No.

The whole attack on John Stewart in FC#1 could use some clarification, the art didn’t do a good job of conveying the action. I guess Kraken (with Granny inside her) made herself look like Hal Jordan, created the laughing monkey to distract the other GL, then attacked John. John was able to get off a punch, which left the impression of his ring in Kraken’s hand? Even though in the panel right before we see John’s right hand without a ring on it? I’m not even sure this is really a question anymore.

Yeah, that is basically what happened.

mightygodking asked:

Man, Resist opens up so many questions re: timing it’s probably going to be retconned out as not having actually happened. How did Mr. Terrific manage to be in Antarctica AND the Castle at the same time? Why was Amanda Waller (who got fired from Checkmate) show up at the Castle? When did Snapper Carr teleport to the JLA satellite – before the League got there, or after? What happened to Enslaved Firehawk, while we’re at it?

Time distortions. He was in the Castle then Antarctica then back to the Castle (via the OMACs).

As for Waller showing up, I presume she is part of Checkmate expanding its scope to a Global Peace Agency.

Snapper teleported up there before the JLA got there.

Presumably she either escape or the Justice League took care of her when they showed up at the satellite.

Neal K. asked (in an odd question format – why not just say “What order do the tie-ins go in?”):

I think any good FAQ should have an attempt to place all the tie-ins with respect to the main series. Some are obvious, like Batman 682-83, but others are a bit iffier, such as Revelations.

I’ll give you both reading orders. The first is the official Grant Morrison “This is how you should read Final Crisis” reading order, using just the issues he wrote, while the rest is where the other ones “tie-in” (quotes because they really don’t).

Morrison Reading Order

Final Crisis #1-3
Final Crisis: Superman Beyond #1-2
Final Crisis: Submit #1
Final Crisis #4-5
Batman #682-683
Final Crisis #6-7

The Entire Reading Order

Final Crisis #1
Final Crisis: Rage of the Red Lanterns #1
Final Crisis: Requiem #1
Final Crisis #2
Final Crisis: Rogues’ Revenge #1-3
Final Crisis #3
Final Crisis: Superman Beyond #1-2
Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #1-5
Final Crisis: Revelations #1-5
Final Crisis: Resist #1
Final Crisis: Submit #1
Final Crisis #4-5
Final Crisis: Secret Files #1 (any time, really, but I guess around this time makes the most sense)
Batman #682-683
Final Crisis #6-7

As a side note, DC Universe: Last Will and Testament #1 was originally a Final Crisis tie-in but was released without the name, and I think that likely has to do with the fact that it really does not tie in to the story at all – so just pretend that it is just some unnamed OTHER crisis that the heroes are all talking about in hushed terms – DC must have those a lot, I guess, maybe, I dunno.

Billy F. asked:

So is Vandal Savage Cain, or was Cain hiding out in Vandal Savage, or what? I don’t quite understand his situation.

I’m reading it as Cain is possessing Savage via the Mark of Cain.

Does Final Crisis: Resist fit into the greater Final Crisis framework at all?

Yeah, the OMACs show up fighting against the bad guys in Final Crisis #7. Beyond that, it was just a chance for Rucka and Trautmann to wrap up their Checkmate series.

What was the panel that Morrison said DC asked him to add in Final Crisis 7?

He wanted to hint that Batman was not dead, but DC made him make it more explicit.

So, by Wally West believing that the Black Flash and the Black Racer are in fact the same entity, is Grant Morrison claiming that every embodiment of death is just a different version of the same destroyer god? How about Death from the Endless? …actually, there is no way for you to answer this question unless you are Grant Morrison, so…forget it.

Forgotten.

McFly asked:

Who was the character with the monkey hands with Metron in a wheelchair and the guardian?

As seen above, unknown, but the typewriting monkey from Animal Man is a possiblity.

Wasn’t Anthro alive in the DCU? How’s it possible that he died as an old man in prehistory? Or is it another Anthro from a different dimension?

Yeah, with all the various Earths in play, you can read that Anthro as being any number of different Anthros. To wit, what if the Anthro at the end of Final Crisis #7 is on Earth-51? I dunno, I think it is all up in the air.

What happened with the Spectre and the spirit of hope? When did Mandrakk defeated them? Was it supposed to happen in Revelations?

Revelations just sets up each of their respective status quos. They then show up in Final Crisis #7 because everyone gets involved in Final Crisis #7.

Is Mr. Terrific dead?

No.

How exactly did Darkseid’d death worked? Batman killed him, but later Flash and the omega rays over-kill him?

Hehe.

Batman weakens him enough for the other stuff to happen. The Flashes then basically kill him, but this is Darkseid, so he manages to last awhile longer and in fact, when he loses corporeal form, that is almost WORSE, as it begins to tear apart the fabric of the universe.

It’s not exactly Final Crisis, but is a Crisis tie-in: In the two-part episode just after Rip, in Batman’s flashback, the original Kate Kane appears, is she supposed to be a) just a dellusion, b) the same Rucka’s Kate Kane, c) a parallel Kate Kane, d) nothing. It was an error that slipped through the cracks?

Basically A, but of course what it really is a statement about how Kane DID exist before she was wiped out by Crisis.

McFly asked:

What happened to Scott Free and Barda, by the way? Is he dead?

They died, but they might have returned. That remains to be seen, basically.

The Mutt asked:

What I need is a box score. Who is dead? Who is new? How many Earths are there? Has the past been changed? Etc.

Martian Manhunter, Hawkman and Hawkgirl were killed (plus a bunch of various heroes like Empress and Sparx and Negative Woman COULD have been killed, but I believe their deaths were left intentionally vague).

Batman is believed dead and is currently lost in time and space.

The Monitors are all gone, except for Nix Uotan, who remains as the link between the “Over-Monitor” and Earth.

Actually, I honestly do not know how many Earths there now are. My best guess is 52, but we might once again have a limitless multiverse. A big deal is the fact that people now KNOW that the multiverse exists.

The past has not been changed.

McFly asked:

I don’t quite follow Superman Beyond. Could you explain the monitors story to me, please? As I understand, in the beginning there was one monitor, then the imperfection, then parallel earths and the bleed, no? So the monitor created that metallic superman, am I right? So, after that, how did the monitors became a little race (compairing it with the original one), and who was the one that got corrupted and why? That one was the one that get locked behind that door? Then what happened with the other monitor, the one that betrayed Nix Uotan?

And who is the one monitor from the crisis on infinite earths, then?

I’ll try to make this as straightforward as I can (it is tough)….

There was once a being, I do not know if he even has a name, but above I call him the “Over-Monitor,” so let’s go with that. This being discovers the multiverse and sends a probe to explore the multiverse (the Monitor). However, the multiverse is a lot more complex (and quite a bit seductive) than he expected, and the probe was split into two equal and opposite probes, one good one evil, the Monitor and the Anti-Monitor.

After the death of the first Monitor and the defeat of the Anti-Monitor in Crisis, the Over-Monitor created a society of Monitors who lived in basically the ether of the multiverse. Their existence was discovered post Infinite Crisis.

The very first one sent by the Over-Monitor was called Dax Novu. There is some debate whether Dax is intended to be the Monitor of Crisis on Infinite Earths. It’s possible.

Okay, so as this society of Monitors begins to grow, it slowly becomes apparent to Dax that the Monitors have an almost parasitic (one could call it vampiric) relationship with their respective worlds of the Multiverse. They sort of feed off of the stories of the worlds they monitor. They do not wish to believe him, so they shun him and imprison him “forever.” Before they do so, he leaves behind a thought-robot designed to defeat himself if he is ever freed, because he knows that cut off from society that he is going to go mad. Dax slowly descends into madness and becomes Mandrakk, a flat out evil jerk who wants to consume the universe.

Secretly, he gains a disciple named Ogama who bans Nix Uotan to Earth to clear the way for Mandrakk to escape.

The big reveal is that Nix is the son of Dax.

As for the first Monitor – he could be Dax, he could be just one half of the probe and long dead. I think Morrison leaves it intentionally vague.

Aqualad asked:

Aquaman returns in his kingdom’s time of need. Was this a plot point that had been hinted at in some other comic, or was Morrison just making the obvious King Arthur parallel?

The latter.

Also- could you explain Superman Beyond to me? I really didn’t get it, but I can see how important it is to the Final Crisis story.

Basically see above, except to note that Superman uses the “thought-robot” that Dax created and he defeats Mandrakk back in the ether of the multiverse, but Mandrakk survives, along with Ogama and a now vampiric Ultraman to fight again another day (that other day being Final Crisis #7).

Snapper and Rogue both asked previously asked questions (Mutt’s quick recap question and Neal K.’s “question” about the reading order, respectively).

Paradox Factor asked:

A timeline would be helpful placing everything. I mean, I’m still not sure if the current Justice Leage of America arc takes place during or after FC. In it, Dr Light is dead, urned into a candle. But Batman is called Bruce by Wonder Woman.

McDuffie’s Justice League of America arc does not fit in with Final Crisis. Just a mix-up there.

Also, what was up with teh alternate earth Nazi Supergirl from issue one. She just kinda showed up out of nowhere and was forgoten about until her body was seen in issue 6. Was that ever explaned at all how she got to the main DC earth, what killed her, ect.?

The upheaval in the multiverse basically flung her out of her universe and the trauma of being forcefully expelled from her universe likely killed her, but we do not know for sure what did it to her. We didn’t see her because she was in Checkmate custody, as they prepared to do an autopsy on her, as seen in Final Crisis #6. Her expulsion was also the impetus for Overman to join up with the other folks in Superman Beyond, so perhaps Ogama and Mandrakk purposefully killed her to give Overman incentive to go along with them?

BrianC (great name!) asked:

Two questions – Morrison mentioned in his “exit interview” on Newsarama that “Apart from one scene at the end, which I included at DC’s request, and contrary to online rumours, there were no rewrites on Final Crisis.”

Was that the Aquaman scene he alludes to- seemed pretty random, and a good way for DC to never have to publish “Aquaman: Rebirth”.

No, it was the last page where he makes it explicitly clear that Batman is still alive. I expected Morrison to address Batman still being alive, but I’ll admit I expected something a bit less clear, and it’s good to know that that WAS his original intention, but DC asked him to make it clearer so it could be seen by the cheap seats.

Also, what were they doing to Overman’s cousin? She was being experimented on by Checkmate?

Yep. Just basic autopsy stuff, I think. Those Checkmate folks can be pretty devious sometimes.

AW asked:

Ok so in FC:Resist we see the OMACs activated and whooping ass, but in FC:6 there’s hardly any mention of them at all and it seems like checkmate and Mr. Terrific are in a tough spot yet again! So how do the events of FC: Resist tie in?

Since the OMACs began whooping ass in Antarctica and then traveled all the way to Switzerland, I think it’s fair to say that they lost most of them along the way so they only had a few by the time they got back to the Castle. Those few OMACs were used in Final Crisis #7.

David asked:

How was Wonder Woman saved by Frankenstein? Also how did her “binding” Darkseid with her lasso free the three billion people who were under his sway>

It is unclear if he DID save her. But if he DID, it would have something to do with the fact that he was immune to the effects of the morticoccus virus. Honestly, it could be just as simple as “Frankenstein defeated her, allowing the good guys to cure her with an antidote to the morticoccus virus off-panel.” I mean, the morticoccus virus was artificially made, and the “good guys” did have some of the greatest mad scientists in the universe on their side, so it’s not unreasonable to think that they could come up with a cure for the morticoccus virus, ESPECIALLY since all the villains had been inoculated against it.

But really, the “true” answer is that Morrison leaves how Wonder Woman was freed up to the reader’s imagination.

And yeah, her binding of Darkseid freed whatever people were still enslaved.

Chris Buckley asked:

1) the way the happy ending came about, and what it actually means about the “Earth” where the mainstream DCU stories will be set.

Namely: Did the DCU successfully evacuate to a parallel world, leaving New Earth ruined in Darkseid’s wake, or did they manage to restore New Earth itself when Superman wished for a happy ending?

I took it that Checkmate’s alternate-Earth escape hatch “Black Gambit” failed when the graviton bridge collapsed under the Atoms, and that only a handful of Command-D/Bludhaven refugees were successfully transferred, along with the Super Young Team. The abandoned Earth-51 therefore became a new Great Disaster Kirbyverse complete with Kamandi, Forever People and the reborn New Gods. In this reading, New Earth itself was rescued by Superman’s wish. But if that’s the case, why the freezer pops full of DCU survivors?

But in a different reading, the Monitors in their epilogue spoke of a black hole at the base of creation, where Darkseid fell through into void. Since New Earth WAS the base of Creation in the new multiverse, and it was sunk under the weight of Darkseid’s personal singularity, that makes it sound like New Earth was indeed left ravaged in Darkseid’s wake, and Superman’s wish was to make a new home for the survivors of the DCU elsewhere in the multiverse. Hence the freezer pops. But if that’s the case, then where is the new Kirby-world they showed us?

Add to that the confusing use of both “New Earth” and “Earth-0? in the script, and I need some cliff notes!

It’s the first one. The Green Lanterns and the Supermen drag New Earth/Earth-O out of the abyss, Superman takes everyone off of it and freezes them, he wishes the Earth back to normal and then they unfreeze everyone and put them back on Earth.

The new Kirby world is where you expected it, the Earth-51 world.

Is Earth-0 just what we’re calling New earth after Final Crisis, or are they separate places? Whatever it’s called, do DC Comics still take place on the world once known as “New Earth,” or did we just get a change of address notice?

I don’t think we know yet if they’re going to call it Earth-O, New Earth or just “Earth.” But yeah, they’re all the same.

2) Where was this Sonny Sumo from?

The talk about him being from a parralel universe confused me. Was this, somehow, the Earth-51 Sonny who escaped back into New Earth after his world’s great disaster? Or was this the original Kirby Sonny who had escaped back to the present from his medieval Omega Sanction back in the original Forever People?

Yes, this is Earth 51 Sonny Sumo.

3) The generations, and family connections, of the Monitors
We had the original COIE Monitor.
Then we had a reconstituted “race” of Monitors after 52, around whom narratives “crystallized,” giving them individuality.

We also have the mythological Monitors:
-Dax Novu (is HE meant to be the original COIE Monitor?), and
-Mandrakk (apparently the shadow side of Dax Novu, so are they BOTH aspects of the original COIE Monitor?)

In the 52 generation, we have:
-Prime Monitor Tahoteh (Is HE the original COIE Monitor?! What Earth does he monitor?)
-Monitor Ogama (He’s bad, and in league with Mandrakk. Is he “Bob?” What Earth does he monitor?)
-Nix Uotan (Earth-51. Exiled to New Earth/Earth-0. The “son” of Mandrakk…? If so, then also of Dax Novu?!)
-Weeja Dell (His main squeeze. What Earth does she monitor?)
-Zillo Valla (the vampire Monitress. What Earth does she Monitor?)

But the big question is the relationship between our original COIE Monitor, and the Dax/Mandrakk Monitors. Is the Mandrakk reveal a bigger deal than it seemed, because he was actually the original Monitor from 1985?

The Crisis on Infinite Earths Monitor either died as we saw him in Crisis or he was Dax.

Either reading can be justified. Morrison left it intentionally vague. I like it better as Dax being the Crisis Monitor.

As for that other stuff, I don’t believe we’ve been given answers to any of that particular stuff, except Ogama and Zillo Valla, who monitored the Vampire Batman world and the Dark Knight Returns world, respectively (that was a nice little touch having Ogama actually monitoring a vampire world, making him much more susceptible to falling prey to a vampiric being like Mandrakk).

ticknart asked:

Who killed Hawkman and Hawkgirl?
Does this mean there are no more Hawks in the DCU?

Lord Eye, basically.

So Maxwell Lord killed Blue Beetle and his brainwaves killed Hawkman and Hawkgirl!!! Bummer!!

And no, there will certainly be more Hawks. Morrison goes out of his way to play up the fact that the Hawks resurrect

Rob asked:

If Bruce Wayne was put through the “Omega” Experience when he was shot by Darkseid’s rays, who was the body that Superman was holding. Apparently, the rays make a person live the darkest moments of their lives as they could have been. People are physically transferred to these events and it looks like they disappear. The events are supposed to be so bad that they wind up dying. There was a body left behind: who was it? Bruce Wayne apparently survived this: how?

Likely this will be explained when Morrison returns to Batman in June (likely not IN June, but somewhere in his run).

And yes, the Omega Sanction does that to normal people, but Batman is not normal, hence him surviving.

And as I mentioned before, with everything going on (including just having been shot), I think it’s fair to say the Omega Sanction had odd effects this time around, namely a corpse being left behind.

On another subject:

Why did Barry have to return? Was he outrunning the god-of-death into Darkseid and that is how the big bad is defeated? I thought Batman shot him with a hyper-time-bullet or something? Or did Wonder Woman bind Darkseid and the magic lasso took him out? I don’t understand why it had to be Barry, AND how Darkseid actually died.

The “gods” released Barry because they needed someone to bring the Black Racer to Darkseid. Well, if you’re going to release someone from the Black Racer, you need someone who is not going to just get caught by the Black Racer right away, right? So that’s why they chose Barry – he literally was outrunning death.

As for who killed Darkseid – Batman shoots him and weakens him enough that the Flashes are able to get close to him, which basically kills him as a corporeal being. While holding on to the corporeal body, though, Wonder Woman binds him and breaks the bond he had over however many billions of humans. Finally, as a non corporeal being, he is ultimately vanquished by Superman.

For a dude as evil as Darkseid, you needed a LOT of people to stop him, in this case, you needed possibly the four most famous superheroes in the DC Universe (them and Ambush Bug would be the Top Five).

Rob also asked:

The original Crisis was about condensing infinite worlds into one.

Infinite Crisis was about expanding the amount of worlds into at least 52.

What was Final Crisis’ overarching story about? Was it to end the works of Jack Kirby in the DCU? Did it expand or condense the amount of worlds in the multi-verse?

Final Crisis was about expanding the multiverse and getting rid of the Monitors, basically “freeing” the stories of the DC Universe from those who want to suck the life and joy out of them.

Angus asked:

How did Black Lightning know the sigil that he showed to the Tattooed Man (who showed it to the Ray, who put it on the Earth)?

Unknown, as Black Lightning never got a chance to explain where he got it from before he was captured by the Justifiers.

Let’s say he got it from….hmmmm….Moe.

muffinpeddlar asked a whooooooooole lot of questions:

just read to try not to repeat questions. Lots of people seem to share my Mandrakk confusion.
Morrison has a history of fiction about fiction. The limbo in Superman Beyond seems to be the same one from Animal Man. That being said, do the monitors represent writers? Is Mandrakk a “dark writer” writing the end to everything, but since Superman is so pure he is able to defy the writer and make it a happy ending?

Most likely, yes.

They say that Frankenstein was important because he was immune to Morticoccus, a disease that steals super-powers. But no one seemed to have lost their powers at all.

Snapper Carr lost his powers in Final Crisis: Resist! But yeah, for the most part, we didn’t see many people lose their powers. My best guess is that for a story with this much story to be packed in, they felt it wasn’t worth showing the people withOUT powers.

How can Catwoman be a justifier when it took her “months” to recover from Hush taking her heart, even though “Heart of Hush” is directly before R.I.P?

I would say “time distortion” (which fits here unlike Justice League of America), but really, it was just a mix-up on Paul Dini’s part. I doubt he was particularly following Final Crisis closely.

Dr. Light is killed during Final Crisis. How can his remains be central to what seems like a pre-crisis JLA arc?

Mix-up on the part of Justice League of America.

Did the Supermen and the GL Corps literally rebuild the earth? How is that possible?

They just dragged the Earth back from the abyss. Superman rebuilt the world with the Miracle Machine. It is possible because the machine does miracles.

Were Green Arrow and Black Canary supposed to have died?

They looked close to death, but they were most likely saved after they passed out and were then revived.

When Darkseid fell through time, did he land during or around Infinite Crisis? That would account for 7 Soldiers and with the Dark Side Club being on earth for two years and make some sense with countdown.

Sounds about right, time-wise.

When did Boss Dark Side die? Did i miss it?

Between issues #1 and #2 of Final Crisis.

How exactly did Barry Allen return to life?

If there is any “exact” explanation for how he came back, I’m sure we will learn it in Flash: Rebirth. For now, his return was anything but exact.

Are Manos and Menos dead?

I think this was left intentionally vague. If no one wants to ever use them again, yes. If someone wants to use them again, no, they were just knocked out.

Why is Mirror Master working for Libra? In Rogues Revenge he’s dead set against it.

Rogues’ Revenge is set after he worked for Libra. Presumably he had a change of heart.

What the hell is Command D?

It’s where Darkseid’s minions do experiments on people and animals.

Why does everyone act like they barely know the New Gods? Some of them were JLA members.

Some of the Justice League DO barely know the New Gods.

But yeah, that was a retcon Morrison wanted for Final Crisis, that while the New Gods still did interact with the Justice League (and they don’t say otherwise in Final Crisis #1), they were seen as a lot more distant than, say, Lightray palling around with Blue Beetle.

When and why was Earth 51 destroyed? Was that in countdown?

Yeah, that was in Countdown.

That was one of the plot points that Countdown DID set up nicely for Morrison and Final Crisis.

It was destroyed by Monarch and Super(boy? man?) Prime and was replaced by a new Earth-51, which was then decimated by a virus.

Are the monitors messed up because story has entered their world? Zillo Valla says “Time has entered our timeless world. Beginnings and Endings.”

They are messed up because they’re obsessed with stories, yeah.

Why did Anthro get transported to Kamandi’s world? Why was it never touched on after issue 1?

He didn’t, that was Nix Uotan manipulating the multiverse, allowing Kamandi to visit Anthro in #1 and Dan Turpin in #2 in a failed attempt to avert Final Crisis.

Just explain everything with Superyoung Team. They confuse me.

They’re just a team of young Japanese heroes. That’s really it.

Did Nix Uotan ever find the “Magic word that would take him home?” What was it?

Yeah, it was “Weeja,” the name of the woman he loved.

Why is Bludhaven around? Didn’t Monarch turn it into a crater?

It still basically is a crater, just a crater that still houses Command D.

How is Superman keeping Lois’ heart beating with heat vision?

When he says “heat vision,” he means “infra-ray vision.” People often conflate infra-rays with heat anyways.

In any event, Superman is using his infra-ray vision to massage her heart, keeping it beating.

Mary Marvel infected Wonder Woman with some kind of disease. Was that Morticoccus?

Yes.

“Darkseid is sitting at the center of a personal singularity.” Okay….that means what?

In this sense, think of a singularity like a black hole. So Darkseid existing (when he was intended to be dead) is like a black hole existing in one person in the middle of the Multiverse, which is why it is causing so much havoc in the Multiverse.

How did the GL Corps wind up in the bleed in issue 6?

They fell into the bleed at the end of Final Crisis #5.

Can the panels in issue 7 be put into a chronological order?

Yes.

So are the New Gods on Earth 51?

Yes.

Sylar Wesker asked:

OKay after re-reading some teases and interviews this is what I need to know:

1) DC #0, how does that show Darkseid falling through the Multiverse? I mean honestly, unless you read that somewhere else in a Morrison interview, how were supposed to know that?

There is a drawing of a dude who looks like Darkseid “falling” through the pages. There are even “gaps” in the pages where the dude “falls through.”

2) All this hype about Libra, yet nothing explains (a) how he was immune to the Spectre? (b) There were interviews where Grant said “What’s going on under mask will be revealed (ALL STAR GRANT MORRISON I: Final Crisis, Comic Book Resources, April 15, 2008)” yet we get some origin that seemed rushed, and not in the main series nonetheless. Does that mean there was a a GRANDER scheme or idea for him? I mean what about that JLA #21 reference of him being an alien warlord?

A. Yep, you’re right, that was never explained. Libra will likely return, so we may learn then!

B. No, no grander scheme, besides Libra’s likely return in the future!

3) THose comics with the SIGHTINGS were supposed to have a connection somehow right? in “DC Nation” #110 thats what they said, yet I think only one was tied in.

Yeah, that was a mix-up by DC. They dropped the SIGHTINGS thing soon afterward, right? Justice League of America #21 was pretty big, though, as it featured the Human Flame.

4) What about all that information the Final Crisis scrap book provided?

They came up with more ideas than they ended up using in the project, yes.

5) Granny Goodness was in a fat black lady, then a green lantern, and then back in a black lady right?

Not in Final Crisis, she wasn’t.

6) What happened to Infinity Man? Where does he fit into all this? And the SOurce, has a personality in DOtNG but none in FC?

As mentioned above, Death of the New Gods does not really fit in with Final Crisis, besides the basic “all the New Gods died” part.

7) Gog of the 3rd world had no influence in FC? Why not?

Morrison did not want to use Gog of the 3rd world in this story, likely as Geoff Johns and Alex Ross were doing plenty with him in Justice Society of America.

8 ) What about all the other gods? Why weren’t they involved?

The other gods began to get involved at the end of Final Crisis #7. If things got worse, they might have ALL had to get involved. Luckily, it did not get to that point.

9) That Aquaman scene seem to come from nowhere, why?

To return an old school, unencumbered by continuity Aquaman to the DC Universe.

10) All this hype about Barry Allen coming back, yet all he really did was runaway from the Black Racer. And that is the grand re-entrance that will displace Wally? Please tell me there was supposed to be more?

He was the only one who COULD run away from the Black Racer and not get caught.

And yes, there will be a whole mini-series written by Geoff Johns explicitly detailing the changeover from Wally to Barry (if that is what happens at all).

11) How is this what Grant said “The final fate of the multiverse”? It seemed like just another Darkseid story.

Is this even a question?

In any event, this got rid of the Monitors (it was THEIR “Final Crisis”) and returned the multiverse of old, thereby giving what Morrison would term “the final fate of the multiverse.”

12) Wasn’t the first page supposed to have Anthro and the last page have Kamandi? What happened there?

Morrison changed his mind.

13) If there was a war in heaven, and evil won, how/why did Darkseid fall from heaven? Does that mean then that good really won? Or is his defeat in FC #7 the event that made him fall to begin with and heaven was on Earth where he was reborn after Orion killed him a 2nd time…

Evil won by Darkseid escaping death, forestalling the creation of the Fifth World.

14) What exactly is the Anti-Monitor’s connection then to the Monitors?

He was one-half (the evil half) of the original probe that the Over-Monitor sent into the Multiverse.

Since he is apart from the following group of Monitors, when they ceased to exist, he remained, thereby allowing future Geoff Johns stories to be told.

Rob R. asked:

Will this really be the “final” crisis? At least for the next year or so?

That’s the thing about the title, this IS the final crisis – for the monitors. As for the heroes of Earth, if you view “Crisis” as having to do with restructuring the multiverse, then this likely WILL be the last crisis for the foreseeable future.

capt__proton asked:

I have two very straight and simple question:

1) What happened to the New Gods and the Forever People of New Genesis? Why couldn’t or didn’t they appear in the main narrative? Why was it that Darkseid and all of his cast/minions (i.e. Kalibak, Granny Goodness, Desaad, etc.) were are able to inhabit host bodies, but the audience never saw the New Gods of the ‘Fifth World’?

They all died.

As mentioned earlier, only Darkseid escaped – his minions exist only as aspects of Darkseid himself.

We will meet the New Gods of the Fifth World now that the Fifth World was allowed to come into existence.

2) What was the role of Mister Miracle in Final Crisis? If he could overcome the Omega Sanction placed on him in ‘Seven Soldiers: Mister Miracle’ Miniseries, presumably as a result of discovering the Life-Equation/ the ‘Source’, then what need would Mister Miracle have for Metron’s symbol?

I only ask because in the Final Crisis Skectchbook, there were a ton of illustrations of the New Gods, and then the only time we get to see them is in a single panel in the last issue.

Mister Miracle was fine HIMSELF, but he wanted to help the people of Earth, as well.

And as for the sketches, those never got used as Morrison and Jones came up with more ideas than they had room to use.

Dave asked:

Related to the Final Crisis sketchbook, what was the point of devoting it almost entirely to characters that never actually appeared or were alluded to in the series itself, such as the redesigned versions of Desaad, Granny Goodness and the Forever People (like Big Bear with a Darkseid T-Shirt,) not to mention the Japanese heroes like Ultimon, Cosmo Racer, Boss Bosozuko, Hammersuit Zero-X and basically anybody in this book that wasn’t Mister Miracle, Darkseid, Turpin, Libra, or the Super Young Team?

I mean, were these character supposed to be featured at one point, and Morrison had to write them out, or did he just sell a book largely consisting of sketches and biographies for characters he never actually intended on using?

It was as it was advertised, a sketchbook that they came up with. In fact, BECAUSE they did not end up having room for these characters that they spent time designing thinking of, they likely figured it made sense to share these ideas and characters with people through a different format.

In addition, while these ideas and characters did not make it into Final Crisis, they likely will all be factors in future appearances of said characters, especially the Japanese Heroes (who will be starring in their own Joe Casey-penned Final Crisis Aftermath mini-series!).

mentalpatient asked:

Did the GLs spend the better part of the second half of the series perpetually flying towards Earth, only to be summoned at the end by Nix Uoton?

They basically were stuck in a holding pattern from the end of #5 to the end of #7, but they seemed to free themselves on their own by my reading.

I agree with a who’s who of the monitors is needed.

Here’s a who’s who of the Monitors that you need to know in Final Crisis:

Over-Monitor – The dude who got everything going.

Monitor/Anti-Monitor – Two halves of a probe the Over-Monitor sent into the Multiverse to study it. One became good, the other became evil. The Anti-Monitor is still running around somewhere.

Dax Novu/Mandrakk – The founder of the society of Monitors who was shunned when he figured out that the Monitors were actually cosmic vampires feeding off of stories, eventually was corrupted into Mandrakk while in exile. He could POSSIBLY be the Monitor mentioned above.

Nix Uotan – Soon of Dax, the good Monitor who was banished to Earth by the evil Monitor Ogama. He later becomes the only Monitor left on Earth (who is still a Monitor). He is the direct connection to the Over-Monitor.

Weeja Dell – Nix’s love, and the way he was able to access his powers on Earth.

Zillo Valla – Lover of Mandrakk (mother of Nix?).

Rox Ogama – The evil Monitor who organized Nix’s banishment and who later serves Mandrakk.

There’s some other ones, but their names are unimportant (incompetent leader #1, incompetent leader #2, etc.).

I also don’t see how Frankenstein was able to heal WW. By having her get bitten by a huge dog?

It is not explained, but you know what’s interesting? Remember when I mentioned that they likely just gave her an antidote off panel? Wouldn’t it be kinda cool if the “huge dog” (looks like Fenris to me) was the delivery system for the antidote? You know, like they knew conventional needles might not work, so they used a dog’s bite to deliver the antidote! That would be cool, and that really establishes what “really” happened, which was that Morrison left it up to the reader’s imagination to determine exactly how Wonder Woman was cured.

Why is it that when Batman shot Darkseid, the bullet didn’t go back in time? Was it because when Darkseid was shown shooting the gun, it was at the Flashes? Did the Flashes send the bullet through time and accidentally kill Orion?

It was Darkseid who caused the bullet to travel through time, so Batman shooting it wouldn’t do anything (time-wise).

The scene in #1 with Kamandi and Anthro (whose identity I only know because of the internet) still needs to be explained to me.

Multiverse fluctuation by Nix Uotan allowed Kamandi to show up to warn Anthro in #1 and Dan Turpin in #2.

I concur with the artist breakdown.

See above.

Not that I expect an answer from this, but I would like to know how much of the story was changed in progress (which has to have happened; see @Sylar Wesker #12) as well as how much is attributed to Jones leaving the book.

Morrison says he only changed one thing (the Batman page).

Time will tell if that is the whole story.

Grico asked:

Just some basic:

So Libra was just the one-shot Libra villian from an old Justice League issue? Did we get any clarification of where he was during that time or was working on being reconstituted the whole time? How exactly did he fit with any idea of balance when Darkseid seemed to want total victory for evil? What important role did Libra have other than distracting people a bit while Darkseid and friends got reconstituted in human bodies?

Yes, that was the same Libra. Len Wein wrote a story in Final Crisis: Secret Files explaining how Libra hooked up with Darkseid. I believe his “balance” take was that Darkseid is so powerful he overpowers the very idea of balance.

So I am right in the Human Flame doing nothing after getting Martian Manhunter killed?

Yep.

Now he will be running for his life from heroes looking for revenge.

Do we have any indication of time/history changing or should we just see this as a point in history where bad things happened but everything got restored to normal afterwards?

Yeah, the latter option.

I feel like the delay in issues really killed my ability to follow what was going on besides the general themes and general plot. I’m going to read everything sequentially with the tie-ins included in one sitting once I get the time.

Okay.

See the above reading orders to see what order to read them in!

CharlyAR asked:

What happened to Batman?

Lost in time and space.

What happened to Darkseid?

He died.

Who or what was Libra?

He is basically just Darkseid’s agent on Earth.

Why did Superman “sing” some note?

To achieve the perfect pitch to counteract the multiverse vibrational waves that Darkseid was existing on (Darkseid’s last grasp at avoiding death).

What is the Omega Sanction?

This power of Darkseid, it has unpredictable qualities to it, but mostly it transports people through time and space (usually killing the person it zaps)

What’s going on with the monitors? Why were they like vampires? Where do you find information about them? The last time I saw them, they were fighting Monarch (Captain Atom)??? I don’t understand anything about Superman Beyond.

The Monitors secretly have been feeding on the worlds they are monitoring, parasite/vampire-style. Superman Beyond explains it all, and I explained Superman Beyond above.

What is the bleed? Where is Captain Atom?

The Bleed is just another term for the multiverse.

I am pretty sure Captain Atom’s whereabouts are unknown at the moment.

What did Batman mean when he said to Kraken “he has a nice punch” or something like that in the beggining of Final Crisis?

Batman noticed the imprint of John’s ring on Kraken’s hand, which allowed him to realize that it was Kraken who assaulted John. His remark about John having a nice right hook shows that he knows that John managed to punch her before she took him down.

What did just happen with Vandal Savage history? He was a cromagnon man. Now is something related with the bible?

One interpretation is that Savage is considered to have been the original Cain of the Bible, but I don’t think that’s definitive. Feel free to just view him as you always have.

What finnaly happened with the New Gods?

The New Gods of the Fifth World appear at the end of Final Crisis. We shall see what they are in the future.

And above everything: Is there a “final” COHERENT read order with ties-in? I mean, I still don’t know what happened with Aquaman, Wonder Woman, the Atoms, and half the DCU…

The tie-in reading order I give you above works decently, but not perfectly.

Only the Morrison-written comics really read together coherently.

Even there, certain aspects of the comic are left to the reader’s imagination (or future writers) to fill in what happens.

Chris Jones asked:

Are ALL of the Monitors parasites, or just a few of them? It seemed like it was just a really small group that was feeding off of the Multiverse in Superman Beyond.

They all are, some of them are just more aggressive than others. Ogama, Zillo Valla and Mandrakk being the main “culprits.”

muffinpeddlar asked:

I just read that Mary Marvel was posessed by Desaad. Did anybody catch that? and if we’re blaming her “dark streak” on Desaad, how do you explain countdown, and the current JSA arc?

Yeah, Final Crisis #5 hints that Desaad is possessing her and Final Crisis #6 confirms it. Morrison seems to suggest that he wanted that to fully explain her actions (again, with Countdown just not matching up to what he wanted very well).

However, as of right this very second it appears as though, based on her Justice Society of America appearances, she was already “bad” when Desaad took control of her body. HOWEVER, the Justice Society of America arc just began, so we don’t know for sure what will happen there. It could all be a ruse of some kind.

looseleaf asked:

A timeline / reading order would really help -I only read the main series and it didn’t make a lick of sense…

See above.

Matt asked:

Why was Black Adam so weak against evil Mary Marvel and how could his gods be ‘far away’ like he stated and why would that even matter?

Likely, fluctuations with the multiverse are affecting Black Adams’s attachments to his gods. It is admittedly left vague.

Did Final Crisis happen at the same time as Reign in Hell or is there another reason the DCU magic users weren’t seen much (if at all) during FC?

They might have been at the same time. Besides that, a number of magic-users did show up, and it is likely that if things got worse, more would have showed up (a la the Pax Dei).

Myskin asked:

1-Who is the hodded monkey-shape guy who talks to Nix Uotan in #5? Perhaps the type-writing monkey who wrote the Book Of Limbo?

It is kept vague, but besides Himon, the typewriting monkey is the next best guess (or possibly THE best guess, depending on your viewpoint). It certainly would explain how he knows so much about the power of stories.

2-In #7, Montoya is travelling through the Multiverse to collect the Supermen. Does that mean that the earth Ultima Thule was abandoned on – at the end of Superman Beyond 2 – is Earth-51 (where is recovered by Montoya)?

That sounds correct.

3- What’s the PRECISE timeline of Kamandi? In #1, Anthro sees him through a Miracle Machine graffiti – induced hallucination (doesn’t he?). But in #2, He is among the imprisoned guys in Bludhaven, and in #7 he makes some strange comments about a vision he had in a Bunker In addition: which vision is he talking about?. Which earth does Kamandi originally come from?

He is manifesting throughout time via fluctuations in the multiverse courtesy of Nix Uotan. So his timeline is anything but precise. As to what Earth, presumably Earth-51.

Sprout asked:

Is Earth 51 the Earth where all the Kirby 70s DC Comics (Fourth World, Kamandi, OMAC) happened ?

Basically, yes.

olokin asked:

Is Final Crisis the first appearance of the god killing radion?

No, it’s from Kirby’s Fourth World comics.

How was Wonder Woman turned to thralldom?

Anti-Life Equation, same as everyone else.

suedenim asked:

When the anti-life equation was first unleashed on Earth’s communications networks, the series of tubes, etc., what exactly determined who fell to it and who didn’t? Was it pure chance? Making a saving throw against willpower? (If simply being heavily-networked made you vulnerable, for example, you’d think Oracle and Checkmate would be the first to go, not the last.)

Length of exposure.

People who were “trapped” (like those shown in airplanes and subway stations) were screwed. If you could quickly tune out, you were saved. Oracle helped save a great deal of the world by “killing the net” at the end of Final Crisis #3. Even then, just a glimpse almost turned Oracle.

After that, it was just zombie style. If you got caught by an infected person, they would try to infect you.

(Oh, and speaking of that, what happened with Sasha Bordeaux after the Crisis was over?)

The notion was that she cut herself off so that she would not be enthralled to Darkseid. However, Mr. Terrific needed her to reboot to use her connections to the Checkmate computers, thus infecting her with the Anti Life Equation. She shut down again and if she ever woke up, she’d be infected with the Anti-Life Equation.

Since a cure was found, she is likely okay whenever she reboots.

We see later that a few people (and apparently *only* a *very* few, like Nix Uotan) were completely “immune” to anti-life, so that’s not it.

Agreed.

The Kize asked:

I’d like to echo the previous question(s) about the meeting between Anthro and Kamandi in issue #1.

Kamandi echoed through time via multiverse fluctuations courtesy of Nix Uotan.

Also, Morrison said in a pre-Final Crisis interview that his story would explain what the red skies were that appear during every DCU crisis. Was this explanation given in Final Crisis, and if so, what was it?

It is the “Bleed” from Warren Ellis’ Authority, which is now part of the DC Universe, so Morrison is tying that to the DC Multiverse.

When the Multiverse is out of whack, the bleed is visible and the bleed is red (as you would imagine).

Ryan Frank asked:

Wow…thank you for attempting this; I share the confusion on most of these, and here are a few more (sometimes slight variations on prior ones) that are confusing the heck out of me:

1) At the end of the story, have the Monitors ceased to exist or have they all been changed into humans like Nix Uotan? If they’re all humans, I’m not sure why Weeja Dell would be acting like she was saying a Final Goodbye to Nix Uotan. Is Nix Uotan a human now, or does he still have the Vykin-like identity and powers?

They’re all humans except for Nix, who still has his connection to the Over-Monitor.

2) How does Morrison’s conception of the Monitors fit in with their very-different portrayal in Countdown?

Basically, it doesn’t.

Again, Countdown was meant to tie in to Final Crisis, not the other way around. However, due to the impracticality of writing a year-long comic well before the book it is intended to tie into, there were some contradictions. I would say that the Final Crisis conception would be the overriding one.

3) How does Morrison’s conception of the Monitors address the Anti-Monitor? You could say he’s just the Monitor of the anti-matter universe, but that doesn’t seem to fit in the Earths 0-51 scheme and it doesn’t seem likely that the other Monitors would accept one in their ranks whose goal was to destroy the rest of the Orrery. Was he erased from existence/turned into a human at the end as well? If so, how does that square with him being the power source for the Black Lanterns?

The Anti-Monitor was created before the rest of the Orrery, and he exists on a separate plane of existence than the rest of the Orrery and he remained around when they all vanished.

And most importantly…
4) Quoting from DC Universe 0, by Morrison and Johns (meaning that here we’re not talking about “it’ll set the direction of the DCU for years to come” marketing hype, we’re talking about in-story words by Final Crisis’ own author or at least written by Johns with Morrison’s presumed consent): “The first Crisis brought death to nearly all of creation. One lone universe was spared. A second crisis witnessed the resurrection of 52 new parallel universes. And so begins the Final chapter in the saga of the multiple earths. The Final Crisis.” Building off of Rob’s question about the overall multiple-earths story, how was this “the Final chapter in the saga of the multiple earths”? It must be in there somewhere and I’m just not finding it in the story, but how is the multiverse status quo different after Final Crisis than before it? You could maybe point to the removal of the Monitors (and a side question on that: if the Monitors are gone and their goal is to prevent an overabundance of travel between universes because that could cause another Crisis, as said in Countdown, wouldn’t their absence mean that the multiverse is now in imminent danger of collapse?) but, since the Monitors were only introduced as part of the buildup to Final Crisis, I have a hard time seeing their absence as a result of Final Crisis to be a real change in the status quo. It doesn’t really seem like it changed anything.

The first Crisis basically ended the Multiverse.

Infinite Crisis brought it back.

This Crisis effectively reversed the first Crisis.

It is the final chapter in the Multiverse (as much as anything is the “final” anything) because it re-establishes the DC Universe as it existed prior to Crisis on Infinite Earths. Effectively, all of the stories of the DC Universe are now “free” to be used.

Francisco Gonzalez asked:

Issue 1: Tatooedman takes Turpin to the Dark Side Club and later is part of the resistance. What’s his relation to Darkseid????

None. Tattoed Man is just working as a typical bad guy for a gangster (he didn’t know said gangster was Darkseid in human flesh).

Kamandi comes (and goes) to Anthro for the weapon that Metron gave him against the gods. What was the point of this???? What does Kamandi does with it????

Presumably tried to give it to people at later dates to help stop Darkseid.

Submit: How did Black Lightning got the drawing of Metron’s mark????

Since Lightning is captured before he can tell anyone, the answer is unknown. A very likely theory is that Lightning was also visited by Kamandi with the sigil.

Superman Beyond 2: ?????????? A robot Superman with the conscience of the real one???? The Tomb????

Yeah, that was the robot that Dax built to defeat himself. It looks like Superman because Superman is, meta-fictionally, the first superhero story, and that has a lot of power in the world of the Monitors.

Issue 6: Lord Eye. Is this just a gratuitous remaking of Kirby’s OMAC or it did have any importance?

More likely it is just a fleeting idea, but it very well might show up in future stories of the Checkmate characters.

A cool re-design of Darkseid just to show him here wearing jeans and a fat belly?

Yes.

How was Wonder Woman liberated?

We do not know for sure. Possibly Frankenstein. Possibly the Ray.

Issue 7: The whole issue. Lord Eye and the Atoms. The Hawks. Where and why is Mr. Terrific.

He got transported to Earth-51 with the rest of the Checkmate folks.

Was the Earth shrunk, transported or re-made????

The second and third options.

Whose corpse was Superman carring if Batman is in the past????

We do not know yet. Morrison is back on Batman in June. We may learn then.

MRUDY asked:

Could you please provide the current status of the of those who took part or where effected by Final Crisis, specifically who at the end of this crisis is dead, missing, incapacitated, sent to a parallel world, etc . . .

Hawkman, Hawkgirl and Martian Manhunter are dead.

Batman is lost in time and space.

The New Gods have returned to the Fifth World.

We shall see what became of the members of Checkmate.

HammerHeart asked:

Can somebody explain how the hell Superman was keeping Lois alive with his vision powers? I know it was Grant’s wafer-thin justification for keeping him out of the conflict until the climax, but HOW exactly did that work?

Infra-ray vision massaging her heart.

How are readers who only read “Final Crisis” (and none of the spinoffs) supposed to know who Mandrakk was when he appeared on the last issue?

Basically, you’re not. Superman Beyond is “necessary” for the full story. That is why it is included in the Final Crisis hardcover, as it is part of Final Crisis proper.

sgt.pepper asked:

I would also like to know who Libra was. And if your answer is “the Anti-life equation personified,” then I want a better one. What the heck does that mean exactly and how did it happen?

Final Crisis: Secret Files gives his origin. He is basically just a super-powered guy who becomes an agent for Darkseid on Earth.

I think I know the answer the to this, and I’m not sure it matters in the grand scheme of things, but I’d like to know exactly when that Anthro meets Kamandi scene was supposed to be taking place.

In the past for Anthro, likely the future for Kamandi. Kamandi is appearing to Anthro as a sort of temporal vision.

And for that matter, is Anthro’s world just the past of Earth 0 (or whatever the regular DC universe earth is called), or is it another universe entirely? Is Kamandi from the future of Earth 0 or is he in a different universe entirely. And how does if they’re all from different universes, how does it make sense that they all would meet up? These things aren’t really necessary for understanding the series, but I’m curious as to how they would all line up.

It is unclear which world everyone is on, except to note that Kamandi likely is now, at least, on Earth-51.

As to how they would meet up, it was all through fractures in the multiverse. As for the odds, you could suggest the same higher beings who let the Flash loose had something to do with it.

Did the Zoo Crew actually do anything in that final showdown? Would the result have been the same if Nix hadn’t summoned them?

No, they were likely just there in case they were needed.

Nix there was basically just trying to come up with whatever he could to scare Mandrakk into backing down.

Also, why were Zauriel and the Pax Dei summoned? I don’t see them actually doing anything on panel. Would the end result have been the same if they hadn’t shown up? Was it just an intimidation thing?

Yeah, it was an intimidation thing.

Here’s another: is there any significance to the specific universes that each monitor supposedly monitored? For example, I’ve read some people argue that some monitor and his monitored earth was supposed to be a comment on Frank Miller’s affect on the DC universe. Any truth to this? Are there any other monitors that offer some kind of meta comment like this? For example, was Weeja Dell supposed to be the monitor of the Marvel Universe? Is her final conversation with Nix supposed to be some kind of meta conversation between the Big Two?

I would not be surprised if there was intended to be some meta-commentary there (and Weeja Dell sure does work as a Marvel character, doesn’t she?), but it is not explicit in the text.

MarkMc asked:

“Final Crisis” is supposedly the culmination of a chain of events that started way back when Jean Loring took a walk on Sue Dibny’s brain in “Identity Crisis,” isn’t it? That series ended with Batman unsure of how Jean was motivated to do the deed, wondering “Who profits?” Was it Eclipso, manipulating a new potential host? Was it Darkseid, able to direct a simple incident that led to the creation of 52 entire universes (as more fuel for Anti-Life perhaps?) It was through his eyes that Al Luthor saw an escape from the collapse of the Anti-Monitor, problem being it ran through Apokalips, and decided better to hide in the crystal universe. Can all these event series of the past five years be tied together with Darkseid as the prime mover? Way back in COIE, He did choose not to take part in the battles, perhaps realizing an opportunity for a long-range plan.

Could be!

Unlikely (as I don’t believe Grant Morrison viewed Final Crisis as the culimination of a chain of events that started way back when Jean Loring took a walk on Sue Dibney’s brain in “Identity Crisis”), but surely possible!

What the hell is on Earth-1? The original Silver versions of the DCU?

I don’t believe it has been established as of yet.

Dan Larkin asked:

Are the Super Young Team the “Forever People of the 5th World”?

It certainly appears that way, doesn’t it?

But I think that’s intended by Morrison to be left to later writers to make explicit.

Gimp asked:

I’m interested in an examination of every Final Crisis plot point that was lifted by Countdown. For instance:

* Mary Marvel turns evil… because of Darkseid!
* There are 52 Monitors and they are evolving at a rapid rate!
* Orion: Killed by Darkseid!
* Earth-51: Destroyed, then turned into Kamandi-world!
* A war devastates Apokalypse!
* There is an evil Monitor!

It’s possible that Morrison actually revised bits of Final Crisis/Superman Beyond to reflect Countdown, but I’m sure most of it was the other way around.

That sounds about right. And yeah, I also am sure that Morrison is unlikely to have changed any of his bits to match Countdown. I think he was diametrically opposed to such an idea.

Ryan Frank asked:

I’d also join in the call for a coherent reading sequence for FC #7. I think most of my difficulties in deciphering the plot of that issue came from trying to piece together the chronology.

You guys are going to be the death of me!

All right, all right, I’ll put the issue into chronological order. Note that this likely will sound a lot more complicated than it really was, but fair enough, if you want it, you got it!

Pages 8-12

Roughly the same time – Pages 14, 15 and the bottom panel of 16 and Page 18, bottom four panels of 19, middle panel of 20, middle panel of 21.

Pages 5-7, top of 16, top of 19, Page 13, Top and Bottom Panels of page 20, Bottom Panel of Page 21.

Around that same time, Pages 1-4, All But the Last Panel of Page 17

Pages 22-35, with likely the Top Panel of Page 21 and the Last Panel of Page 17 taking place around the time of Page 30.

Pages 36 and 37 are of indeterminate time. Likely Pre-Historic Past, but who knows?

sgt pepper asked:

Did Darkseid use the bullet that Batman shot at him to fire back in time to shoot Orion (I’m guessing yes—was this what Superman meant when he told Darkseid it was suicide? That firing the bullet into the past would guarantee that Batman would find it and would then use it against him? And if so, could Darkseid have chosen not to fire the bullet, and what would the results of that decision have been?)? So Darkseid got the bullet from Batman, and Batman got the bullet from Darkseid (from the past)? So where did the bullet come from in the first place? What about the gun? Did Batman build the gun that Darkseid eventually fired?

It really depends on what your particular theory of time travel is, isn’t it? Some say he could choose not to fire it, some say he would not be able to avoid it.

Why was Barry Allen necessary? If Darkseid was dying, wouldn’t the Black Racer have come after him even if the Flash hadn’t led him there (Batman and Superman found Darkseid, but Death couldn’t?)? And why would the Black Racer stop chasing Barry just because Darkseid got in the way? Wouldn’t Death continue after Barry once Darkseid was dispatched?

Darkseid avoided the Black Racer already, so the “gods” needed someone to bring the Black Racer to him, and the only guy who could outrun the Black Racer would be Barry.

And Death was apparently sated with just the one “person who should be dead” meal.

How did the Japanese heroes get to that final battle with all the Supermen? And why are they there at all? What purpose do they serve in that final battle? They’re not supposed to be the Forever People from the 5th world summoned by Nix are they? The Japanese heroes actually show up before Nix summons the Forever people with the word, “Taaru.”

Looks like they are intended to be the Forever People of the 5th World. Note that no one else gets summoned when he says it, so he’s likely just saying what he had just done.

What is the significance of the Green Lantern cymbal monkey? Whose ring created it and what is it doing there?

I believe it is just Granny Goodness’ bizarre sense of humor. Note that it is not just a monkey, but a monkey dressed as a Guardian. She is mocking the Guardians as she uses one of their “infallible” weapons of truth to assault an honored member of the Green Lantern Corps.

In issue two, when Kraken momentarily regains control of her mind, she says “Tell them our weapons don’t work.” Who is “them” and what weapons is she talking about? I can’t think of any failing weapons being significant to the plot of this story.

Presumably the Alpha Lanterns are the weapons created by the Guardians who do not work against the evil of the evil Gods.

How does it make sense that Kamandi is in the cages in Comand D saying “They’re making us slaves” in issue two? How did he get there? Isn’t he from the future? Is Morrison writing the origin of Kamandi here? Is it consistent with the old Kamandi stories?

Temporal vision of Kamandi via Nix Uotan.

How is it that in the final issue, we see Wonder Woman crush the mask she’d been wearing to dust, but in another panel, the mask is being displayed in the JLA trophy room?

Remember, the story is told out of sequence. She later takes the mask from the trophy room and crushes it.

Willie asked:

At what point chronologically did Wonder Woman put the kids in freezer pops. Was that before or after she smashed her mask and bound darkseid…

Before she smashed the mask (but possibly RIGHT before she smashed the mask, although I believe it was well before she smashed the mask) and after she bound Darkseid.

Mike Loughlin asked:

Do you think Morrison left some of the minor plot points (e.g. what the Hawks and Atoms were up to) vague intentionally because part of the Final Crisis reading experience was that the reader creates his own version of the story to go with what’s on the page?

Partially, yes, I think that was exactly what he was doing at times.

Amy Grayson asked:

At the risk of repeating a question (I tried to read as many up there already), how were the Justifiers “recruited”? Were they “possessed” and then they just worked together? Was that Elasti-Girl or Giganta?

Yeah, they were possessed and then they would recruit other people by exposing them to the Anti-Life Equation.

That was Giganta.

Overgirl, according to FC: Secret Files, was the first successful *experiment* using genetic material from Overman, but then is referenced as his cousin, making her seem more like an alternate Kara Zor-El than “Kon-El”. Which is it?

It could very well be both – she was an experiment that he viewed as his cousin, just like Conner Kent was like part of Superman’s “family.”

I never picked up Superman Beyond, I just thought I’d actually be able to know what was going on in the series itself, I guess I was wrong, but how did that “Legion of Supermen” happen, how was Earth-5 Captain Marvel recruited etc.

Yeah, you more or less need Superman Beyond for the whole story. Luckily, it will be in the Final Crisis hardcover!

Earth-5 Captain Marvel was recruited in Superman Beyond.

With regard to Countdown, I get the Monitors connection, and the anti-life thing, but was there supposed to be anything further with Harley and Holly? What happened with Pied Piper?

Those plots basically went nowhere for now, at least. Pied Piper popped up in Rogues’ Revenge, though!

Did Barry Allen never actually die if he became part of the Speed Force, and either way, how is that explained anyway? I never understood how if Barry was “dead” but Wally and Family lived there and grew up, and the same with Bart?

They did not live in the Speed Force, but some other dimension they accessed via the Speed Force.

And merging with the Speed Force is basically like death.

Finally, and I don’t really expect an answer to this, but what is Morrison’s beef with the whole BDSM gear stuff … I mean why did he feel that gear should be attributed to all things evil? Darker than “the norm” I can understand, but it offends me if it’s put out as evil. Not to mention that Desaad was supposed to wear high heels under his robe, it’s like he’s saying cross dressers are deviant or just weird enough for Darkseid kind of thing.

I do not know.

Loren asked:

In Final Crisis #1, it’s said that Nix Uotan’s negligence is responsible for the loss of Earth 51, and Uotan responds that he “arrived too late to save Earth. There was sabotage, I swear.” A couple of pages later, Zillo Valla says “Ogama fears we have become contaminated during contact with the obscure lifeforms that grow within the workings of the orrery.”

In Final Crisis #7, Nix Uotan says “And here: the plan I used to reconstruct Earth 51, destroyed by Ogama’s treachery.”

I think these are the only references to “Ogama” or “Earth 51? in Final Crisis, even though these details seem kinda important to Uotan’s plotline. So who is Ogama? What happened to Earth 51? What was Uotan’s supposed negligence? And what treachery of Ogama’s led to the destruction of Earth 51? And why should any of this make a lick of sense?

Basically a case of Countdown not syncing up with Final Crisis.

Just imagine that Ogama was behind Solomon doing the messed up stuff to Earth-51 in Countdown.

Whose hairy hands were handling the drawings (of Weeja Dell and the Nazi Superman) at the end of Final Crisis #5?

Best guesses seem to be Himon or the Monkey from Morrison’s Animal Man.

Basically, he is unknown.

Amy Grayson asked:

Oh yeah, one last thing, when the Monitors first appeared way back when now, we saw in the center, an Anti-Monitor. Is that THE Anti-Monitor, and if so, how was it that he was just there and the other Monitors didn’t care, and allowed him to be exploited for use by Sinestro, and then is the heart of the Black Lantern? If Harlequin/ Joker’s Daughter was such an aberration needed to be killed, wouldn’t A-M’s departure figure in as pretty big too? Is Blackest Night really a Crisis sequel considering that we know now that two heroes who have died during two Crises are confirmed as Black Lanterns?

The Anti-Monitor is not tied in to the other Monitors, so they wouldn’t view his existence the same way as people like Harlequin/Joker’s Daughter.

sgt. pepper asked:

The monkey-behind-the-typewriter’s hairy hands?

Very possible!

Linda D asked:

Did Trinity take place before Final Crisis? Is New Krypton after? In Teen Titans we see Wonder Girl in a new costume, and Tim leaving apparently due to R.I.P., but in Wonder Woman, she is seen in her prior costume? Does that mean ‘Olympians is before R.I.P; and thus before Final Crisis? It seems like all over the place!

Final Crisis is intended to be set in the “recent past” of the DC Universe, but beyond that, it is really up to the respective DC books to figure out where it lands in respect to each title. There will certainly be some contradictions – there always are.

But specifically, I imagine Trinity predates Final Crisis while New Krypton follows it.

Oh by the way, someone asked about SIGHTINGS earlier, apparently that is intended for books that are just important to DC Comics PERIOD, not Final Crisis specifically.

Ronn K. asked:

I echo the requests for a reading order for FC tie-ins.

Okay.

And as I asked elsewhere in a similar vein, will the FC TPB, supposedly scheduled for release in April, be just a compilation of the 7 issues or will the other FC tie-in titles like “Rogue’s Revenge”, “Legion of Three Worlds”, “Superman Beyond”, etc. be included as well?

The Final Crisis Hardcover will include: Final Crisis #1-7, Superman Beyond #1-2 and Final Crisis Submit #1.

ZZZ asked:

This might not ring a bell with anyone, and I wish I could give an issue number (I want to say 2 or 3, but I could be wrong – heck, it could have been in one of the tie-ins and I’m completely misremembering) but at one point fairly early on, I could swear there was a scene on the JLA satellite, and in the foreground, unseen by the characters in the scene, we see what appear to be shrunken heroes trapped in bottles. At the time, I remember thinking that was supposed to be an explanation of where the heroes who were missing at the time were, and that later we’d find out how they got there … Did I just imagine that, or was there some explanation?

No, you didn’t imagine that, it was in Final Crisis #4.

It was in the JLA trophy room, so my best bet it was some tribute to a past case.

But maybe it is some secretive clue to a future story!

Oh, and how did Batman escape while he was Darkseid’s minions’ prisoner? When I read it, I just chalked it up to “he’s Batman” and assumed a panel of him slipping his bonds was just implied, but from what I’ve seen online, that was actually explained somewhere. Could someone sum it up in a sentence or two?

In Batman #682-683, Batman is being tortured by Darkseid’s minions using the mind-thief The Lump. Batman basically turns the table on the Lump, and the bad guys have to basically kill the Lump. However, as the Lump dies, Batman (who is still linked to the Lump telepathically) gets the Lump to agree to help him (in return, Batman will avenge the Lump’s death) and so Batman gives the Lump a telepathic boost to allow it to make one last movement before it dies. Said movement is to release Batman from captivity.

Juisarian asked:

Where did Captain Marvel come from? Last I heard he was hanging in limbo doing the wizard in his white costume.

This is the Captain Marvel from Earth-5. He first shows up in Superman Beyond.

ticknart asked:

Did anything actually change for the main DCU because of Final Crisis? (And Batman “dying” doesn’t count.)

Is it actually the “5th world,” even though all the New Gods are alive again?

The Hawks and Martian Manhunter are dead and the Multiverse is now known to the world.

Mika Oksanen asked:

Exactly what happened to the Monitors in the end? Ryan Frank already asked this, and Morrison’s exit interview answers part of his question, but as far as I can see leaves a lot still unclear.. Morrison says in his exit interview that “Monitor-Mind has worked through its own Ultimate Story and spared Nix Uotan to be its sole representative and interface with the Multiverse”. Does this imply (along with statements in the last issue like “make your peace” and “this really is the last day”) that the rest of the Monitors were destroyed? Or does it just imply (along with Nix’s mention of withdrawal in his speech to the Circle of Monitors) that the Monitors are cut off from interacting with the Multiverse but remain in existence? If they are destroyed then how does this happen? Do they destroy themselves (as Nix’s reference to what they have to sacrifice suggests, though how could the rest of the Monitors agree to go along with a suicidal plan?) or does the Monitor-Mind wipe them out? In either case, if they are all destroyed, then how can Nix Uotan say to Weeja Dell that Superman “wished only the best for all of us…He wished for a happy ending”? If the Monitors except for Nix are all destroyed it is surely not a happy ending for them. Genocide is not a happy ending! In either case it is not a happy ending even for Nix, as he loses Weeja for ever. Does this just imply that there are limits even to the Miracle Machine’s power so that it can provide a happy ending for others only at the cost of a bad ending for the Monitors? Is Nix’s last speech with Weeja meant to be a bit ironic?

They are not destroyed, they are reborn as humans, with only Nix, however, regaining his connection to the Over-Monitor.

And yes, there definitely are limitations to what a “happy ending” can provide (note that Superman does not bring Batman or the Hawks or J’onn back).

That said, I don’t think it was meant to be ironic because I don’t believe Superman’s wish destroyed the Monitors. I think the Over-Monitor determined (through Nix) that the Monitors were to end. I think that was not connected to Superman’s wish for a happy ending, so when Nix told her what Superman wished, I’m sure Superman (had it been in control) would have wanted a happy ending for them, as well.

That said, it is certainly left open to interpretation whether Superman’s wish directly led to their vanishing or not.

Of course, if Weeja is reborn as a human, there is always the opportunity for Nix to find her out there among the germs, Zauriel-style.

181 Comments

Great googaly-moogaly. Make mine Marvel, thanks.

That was… long. A couple of corrections: Legion of Three Worlds clearly starts after Superman Beyond but before the Anti-life equation is released. And…

Did the GLs spend the better part of the second half of the series perpetually flying towards Earth, only to be summoned at the end by Nix Uoton?

They basically were stuck in a holding pattern from the end of #5 to the end of #7, but they seemed to free themselves on their own by my reading.

They rode Mandrakk’s destroyers down to Earth.

Great job, Brian!

I’ll just say this since it’s right at the end of the FAQ; I assumed that Superman’s wish did affect the Monitors, in that they’d be happier as humans than weird, stuck-up cosmic librarians. (The separation of Nix and Weeja being one of the wish’s limitations)

A couple of other points:

Was that Elasti-Girl or Giganta?
That was Elasti-Girl.

I’m pretty sure Morrison said that was Giganta in a Newsarama interview. Giganta ‘the monster wummun’ was mentioned in an earlier issue, also, which indicates it was probably her.

At what point chronologically did Wonder Woman put the kids in freezer pops. Was that before or after she smashed her mask and bound darkseid…

Before she smashed the mask (but possibly RIGHT before she smashed the mask, although I believe it was well before she smashed the mask) and after she bound Darkseid.

She smashed the mask much later, when they were selecting mementos to put in the rocket to send into a void. You can see it in a display case earlier in that scene.

That was amazing. Bravo!

That was… long. A couple of corrections: Legion of Three Worlds clearly starts after Superman Beyond but before the Anti-life equation is released.

I dunno, you can certainly argue for it there, but “clearly”?

There are red skies in Final Crisis #3 while Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #1 snatches Superman from a blue sky, ordinary DCU.

And…

Did the GLs spend the better part of the second half of the series perpetually flying towards Earth, only to be summoned at the end by Nix Uoton?

They basically were stuck in a holding pattern from the end of #5 to the end of #7, but they seemed to free themselves on their own by my reading.

They rode Mandrakk’s destroyers down to Earth.

Right, freeing themselves.

The debate here was just whether they got there on their own or were summoned by Nix.

Was that Elasti-Girl or Giganta?
That was Elasti-Girl.
I’m pretty sure Morrison said that was Giganta in a Newsarama interview. Giganta ‘the monster wummun’ was mentioned in an earlier issue, also, which indicates it was probably her.

Good call! Corrected.

She smashed the mask much later, when they were selecting mementos to put in the rocket to send into a void. You can see it in a display case earlier in that scene.

I don’t think it’s necessarily clear when she actually crushes it.

It makes sense there, but really, it makes sense for a lot of different times. A week later. A month later. Or, as you say, when they pick mementos to put into the rocket, etc. Hell, she could theoretically even crush it BEFORE everyone is shrunken down and frozen!

“I believe Morrison’s take on it is that the Death of the New Gods is an approximation of the “war of the heavens” that leads into Final Crisis, and therefore, any such battle would be incomprehensible to regular people, which explains why there were different takes on it. That’s a clever enough solution.”

Not only is that a cool explanation, but it’s yet another tip of the hat to Highfather Moore from Morrison (as I’m sure Brian knows, apocrypha came into play in Miracleman). There seem to be a lot of Moore references sprinkled through Morrison’s work, but maybe I’m seeing things that aren’t there.

So, a question that came to me as I was reading the FAQ (not a ‘when/how/why EXACTLY did this happen?’ question, more just a fan speculation thing): does anyone have any theories where Metron got the anti-anti-life sigil from? Do you think it’s just a letter of the New Gods alphabet, as someone guesses in the text? Could it be an easy Kirby reference I’m missing?

Personally, I think it’s a version of Batman’s cave paintings (as shown at the end of FC #7 and, in more detail, on the strip cover of FC #1) that was simplified over time (like a sigil), hence it showing up all over the world around the same time Bats got sent back in time. But I don’t think I’d find many supporters there.

I dunno, you can certainly argue for it there, but “clearly”?

There are red skies in Final Crisis #3 while Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #1 snatches Superman from a blue sky, ordinary DCU.

No, there are only red skies in the immediate wake of Orion’s murder; the skies go back to normal (see the panel with the Daily Planet exploding, for example) and don’t redden again till the release of anti-life.

Pulling Superman into the future twice just seems unnecessarily complicated.

Not disagreeing, per se, (as I note, it really does come down to whether you think it is once or twice he is called to the future – I think both are supportable, so I certainly am not saying it is wrong to say he is called to the future but once), but you think Superman is in such a good mood in Legion of Three Worlds #1 because, what, he just cured his wife?

That’s certainly reasonable.

Given the smile and wink Clark gives the reader as he leaves Lois’ hospital room, Brian, that seems more than likely. Then again, at this point, I can’t even remember what sort of mood he was in at the start of LoTW.

Hehe, it WAS awhile ago, wasn’t it?

Hmmm…we may have to disagree on a few points…I thought it was fairly clear that Mandrakk WAS the original monitor from COIE who had been created as the probe, split when he entered the multiverse and became corrupted and dependent on stories.

I also thought that ‘Ray’s’ pattern was actually Anthro’s pattern. He spent his entire life walking and painting the symbol according to the directions of Metron. I thought Ray had tapped into that somehow, but that the actual pattern was created by Anthro–and was the reason for the confusion on the satellite when the pattern appeared.

I thought it was fairly clear that Mandrakk WAS the original monitor from COIE who had been created as the probe, split when he entered the multiverse and became corrupted and dependent on stories.

As I note, it’s certainly a possibility, but far from evident.

What part of Superman: Beyond do you feel makes it fairly clear that Dax was the original Monitor (that is, the “good” half of the Monitor/Anti-Monitor split)?

I also thought that ‘Ray’s’ pattern was actually Anthro’s pattern. He spent his entire life walking and painting the symbol according to the directions of Metron. I thought Ray had tapped into that somehow, but that the actual pattern was created by Anthro–and was the reason for the confusion on the satellite when the pattern appeared.

Ray drew the sigil/circuit that the Tattoed Man brought them.

Are you suggesting that that was Anthro’s sigil/circuit instead of Metron?

Not saying you’re wrong, just curious.

Why would Anthro draw anything but what Metron told him to draw?

Thanks a lot for all the hard work, Brian.

I thought Morrison straight up confirmed that LO3W took place after SB in an interview?

Oh, he did! http://www.newsarama.com/comics/010928-Grant-Final-Crisis.html

GM: The Monitrix Zillo Valla recruits Superman’s help in Final Crisis #3 which leads into Superman Beyond #1 and 2, both of which happen in the space between Lois’ final heartbeats. He returns to save her in Beyond #2, only to be contacted by the Legion of Super-Heroes to deal with an emergency in the 31st Century – as seen in Legion of 3 Worlds #1. Normally, the Legion is able to return him to his own time an instant after he left, so naturally he feels secure quitting Earth after saving Lois. After his encounter with Superboy Prime in LO3W, however, he returns late to Final Crisis #6, to find time has crashed, Darkseid rules the world and Batman is dead. Oops.

So yeah, he goes straight from SB #2 to LO3W #1.

As for the Darkseid/Mandrakk thing, I thought Mandrakk caused Darkseid, not the other way around – the Magical Monkey mentions that Nix Uotan created the crisis on Earth “with the power in him,” and the entire point of Darkseid’s victory in Heaven was that it wasn’t prophesied to happen. The storytellers changed Kirby’s prophecy of hope into a doomsday prophecy, and that allowed Darkseid to act as Mandrakk’s unwitting agent fucking shit up on Earth.

B.C.: I certainly hope you got a nice “bonus” for undertaking such a detailed blog of answering everyone’s questions of F.C.

Gppd job.

As for the Darkseid/Mandrakk thing, I thought Mandrakk caused Darkseid, not the other way around – the Magical Monkey mentions that Nix Uotan created the crisis on Earth “with the power in him,” and the entire point of Darkseid’s victory in Heaven was that it wasn’t prophesied to happen. The storytellers changed Kirby’s prophecy of hope into a doomsday prophecy, and that allowed Darkseid to act as Mandrakk’s unwitting agent fucking shit up on Earth.

It’s interesting, David, once you start working in time travel (and as we established with the time traveling Kamandis sent by Nix, Nix was involved in time travel), pretty much everything becomes a possibility, doesn’t it?

So while I still think it is Mandrakk taking advantage of Darkseid (if not for Darkseid, we’d still have a Mandrakk adventure, it would just be relegated to the land of the Monitors – Darkseid just made it possible for Mandrakk to take his battle to Earth), your take that it is the other way around is certainly a possibility.

All I can say is, Empress damn well better not be dead.

I thought that the “Bat Corpse” was one of the clones from the Last Rites issues. Although I doubt that all the clones were grown with cowl and utility belts. but still! Good FAQ, cleared up a lot of stuff from the tie ins I never got around to reading.

Oh, and do we know where/if “Last Rites” is being collected?

It’s currently collected in the Batman RIP hardcover.

Great job, Brian!

Unfortunately, just the fact that the series needed something like this to make some sense of it, shows how poorly constructed and produced it actually was.

It’s no use having all these Mad Ideas if nobody understands what you’re trying to get at, Grant.

Great job, Brian!

Unfortunately, just the fact that the series needed something like this to make some sense of it, shows how poorly constructed and produced it actually was.

It’s no use having all these Mad Ideas if nobody understands what you’re trying to get at, Grant.

Thank you, but just as a note, the goal of this FAQ is to help those who had difficulty understanding it, not to knock the project because some did not understand it (and the counterpoint holds, too, of course, the goal also is not to knock those who did not understand the project).

Sorry…by Anthro’s sigil, I meant I had thought Anthro had spent his life writing what Metron had shown him, which was what the Ray ‘activated.’ The fact that Anthro was still drawing the sigil as an old man as he died seemed to indicate he’d made it his life’s work.

I’d sort of seen it as he’d set up the circuit by Metron’s command, and that Ray turned it on.

By the way, meant to say it earlier, but great job on this. No insult intended by disagreement on fine points.

Eric

Great job, Brian! In what issue / page is the Vandal Savage-Cain connection drawn?

Aha, I gotcha, Eric.

Yeah, that could very well be true. It all comes down, I suppose, to who Black Lightning got the sigil from.

But yeah, I was mostly just confused if you were suggesting that Anthro, like, improvised a sigil or something along that line.

Great job, Brian! In what issue / page is the Vandal Savage-Cain connection drawn?

Gracias.

That was in the Final Crisis: Revelations mini-series. Off the top of my head, I’m guessing #3?

The amount that some people didn’t understand amazes me.

I don’t think Shilo’s coloring was a mistake, I think it was an effect of Motherboxx since the same thing happens to Sonny Sumo after he’s 1st attacked, early in the series. Also I think the color was more Ivory than Caucasian, when you compare the skin tone to other characters.

Shilo’s coloring was definitely a mistake, Didio said it in one of his pre-NYCC 20 Questions video interviews, apologized, and said it’d be fixed in the hardcover.

Despite what Dan DiDio may have said, I thought the same as fernald…

There seemed to be a general lightening of skin tone on anyone wearing the sigil/mask…

Oh well…

You say a few times that you can only assume the color switch on Mr. Miracle is a mistake or that it was possibly or probably a mistake. I believe Didio said in a video interview that it was definitely a mistake that would be corrected for the HC. Great job on the FAQ but a more detailed artist breakdown would be nice, although I’d guess that the eventual HC will have page numbers listed.

Fantastic bit of work, Brian, really good to see some of the small niggly things with the Monitors clarified.

As far as the Bleed being the multiverse, though, just to get nitpicky for a sec – isn’t it the walls between the universes, rather than the actual multiverse, per se?

DiDio acknowledged the Shilo coloring mistake (in a Newsarama video) and said that it would be corrected in the collected editions.

Case closed.

Thinking all this through, the only two scenes I would have really loved to see expanded would be the Wonder Woman/Frankenstein battle and more of Kamandi appearing to people (kind of like Pariah or Barry in the original Crisis).

God Final Crisis was great. And so is this FAQ. I picked up on a few things here I missed even after reading all the annotations and interviwes and what not. I think this has to be something of a living document, at least for the next year or so. It could probably use a bit more of a coherent structuring, too, but that would likely be a lot of work for you.

The one thing I found missing in it, from what I found to be important, would be some discussion on the idea of the sentient universe and how Final Crisis was a celebration of the creativity and inclusiveness of the multiverse battling against the conformity of Darkseid and the parasitic and even small-minded (dogmatic?) constraints of the monitors. I think the Zoo Crew is important as a symbol how everything, even the strangest and most outlandish funny animals comic has a place and value in the history of DC and as one of the endless stories that can be told through the multiverse. But that’s a subjective reading and really if you started to go into every possible reading, this would have taken another six months to compile.

And of course, you could only work with the questions you were asked.

Generally though… great job, Brian.

Woooooooow. Good for you, Brian, you really gave it your all on this one.

I think Morrison concocted an interesting experiment – taking the “drama is just reality with the boring bits cut out” idea, and pushing that to the extreme by defining, like, 80% of storytelling needs (how character got from point a to point b, for instance) as “boring bits.”

But holy cow, does that require a lot of explaining afterward.

Incredible job Brian. That was a lot to get through and some people seemed to demand answers as though you had a obligation to them. Patience above and beyond.

One thing I have a different intreputation on (which might be just plain wrong but we’ll see) is the Omega Sanction. In ‘Mr Miracle’ its described as something along the lines of ‘Death without death’. So by my interuptation the use in both stories is consistant. In ‘Mr Miracle’ Mr Mircale goes through a series of lives, many pretty horrible and dies to be reborn in a more horrible life ad infiniatium, until he escapes. Batman meets the same fate. So Superman finds the corpse of ‘our’ Batman but because he’s not dead per-say he’s just living another life ‘in’ the Omega Sanction, in one case the one we see at the end?

The Mr Miracle story does raise another question for me. I’m cool with the Darksied and co in this story being his ‘remains’ after the big battle of Fourth Earth but the Forever People are there as well, as is Mekron so if only Darkseid survived how come they are there as well. Are they manifestations of Darkseid also, are they the reminance of the Fourth World characters dragged with Darkseid but without the power to re-create themselves. Have I just missed something?

Finally (and this one is nit picky) not wishing to start a Barry vs Wally debate here, cos lets face it the internet doesn’t have enough of them already, but isn’t it fair to say that Barry is the only one who can out race the Black Racer who he (the Black Racer) would need to chase. Its been well established that Wally (and indeed in Final Crisis) is capable of doing this but not being dead the Black Racer wouldn’t necessarily follow. Therefore Barry was brought back to life as he would attract the attention of death, in this case in the guise of the Black Racer and thus lead him to Darkseid.

Re: Barry,

Thematically, I think he’s important because he’s really that last untainted, un-deconstructed Silver Age character(save for that one Identity Crisis tie-in, but that’s sort of overlooked by the fact Morrison originally wanted to use a Barry from another world), the paragon, not to mention the parallels between the the first Crisis and this one, which are all the more important if Mandarrk IS in fact the original Monitor.

That’s the thing about the FAQ. There’s two ways to look at everything in Final Crisis: the plot perspective and the meaning/reasoning behind it. I suppose it’s most useful for this FAQ to get all of the plot questions out of the way so people can more freely focus on what’s really important (which isn’t “character X’s” status quo at the end of it all), but I doubt I would have had Brian’s restraint in this. I’d want to go off and explore what it all meant at every point.

“As far as the Bleed being the multiverse, though, just to get nitpicky for a sec – isn’t it the walls between the universes, rather than the actual multiverse, per se?”

I always read it as the “space” between universes, so realistically if you took ANOTHER step back you’d see the bleed with the various universes contained within it, and refer to the entire construct as the Multiverse. But at this point, I realise I’m starting to sound like a first-year pothead thinking deep thoughts and abandon the exercise.

And I think I understood about 90% of what went on, but this cleared up just about all of my questions (the bit about the non-linearity of the panels in #7 cleared up a lot, actually). I suspect a lot of the problems are from people who actually stuck with Countdown all the way through; having cheerfully abandoned it, the “there was a war and Darkseid’s now here” explanation was more than enough for me.

“Batman meets the same fate. So Superman finds the corpse of ‘our’ Batman but because he’s not dead per-say he’s just living another life ‘in’ the Omega Sanction, in one case the one we see at the end?”

Yeah, I think it has to actually be Batman’s corpse, but he’s either somehow acquired another body (in the same manner Darkseid took over Turpin, maybe? That’d be a neat callback) or is in a place where he exists but without a physical body.

But for stories going forward, it has to be his corpse simply because I refuse to believe anyone in the JLA wouldn’t double-check the corpse. :)

Good catch on the reason why Barry was needed, although the Racer’s (or its manifestation as the Black Flash) never liked Wally much, either.

“Was that exiled Monitor reawoken as that black kid who worked at the burger joint?”

At first, I thought Raekwon was in this thing! I would have gotten it if had brought the ruckus!

Don’t forget that Barry came back chasing the bullet; he knew where and when it was fired (because he saw it happen as he traveled through the time stream in the bullet’s wake), and although he originally thought his job was to stop the bullet, it was really that he knew how to get to Darkseid. On top of that, the Black Racer was on his heels because he was “supposed” to be dead, allowing Barry to lure him right to Darkseid…which is why it HAD to be Barry. Not too many faster-than- light heroes who just happen to have death on their tale AND know how to stop Darkseid.

Wait, are the new Monitors supposed to represent writers or the editors? The latter makes more sense, since in the case of the former you have a bunch of characters that represent the parasitic nature of writing who only exist so that a writer can make a story about the parasitic nature of writing, which sort of defeats the purpose, especially give some of Morrison’s other recent work.

Also, I’d put Last Will and Testament somewhere around the middle of 7 (after Darkseid’s defeat by Flash/Wonder Woman, during the time when the Miracle Machine was being built and before the world was frozen and Superman finished off Darkseid.) It mostly works when put there (there are some Batman scenes that cause issues, but we can say time distortion to deal with that) and most of the description of the “crisis” work best when put there.

The JLA story works if you put part of Revelations 1 early enough: there’s nothing that wrong with the JLA dealing with the mystery of Orion’s death and the Shadow Cabinet arc at roughly the same time. Figure all of that took about a week or so.

Or you could just be like Morrison, and just claim that they’re stories and the continuity problems don’t matter.

Anyone that says FC was easy to understand need to look at the length of this FAQ.

surely contridiction are not just the fault of the teams on individual books, the jla team needs to say i want the use doctor light, morrison needs to say to the higher powers, i am killing doctor light, dc editorial need to them as the jla to alter their story, that is how a shared universe works, you look at how smoothly the recent marvels events have run and tied into each other an dc must feel embarassed. as for as death of the new gods, stalin seems to has been asked to right a story with out being told what the end status quo should to fit i with fc, and although count down started to early for the story, the last half (when it is we specifically tied to fc) could have with much work been altered or if that was too logicistally complicated for a weekly, that morrison could have been asked to make changes. With out even looking that the main stories the failure of the tie in’s to tie show that DC can not correctly manage a shared universe, or are unwilling to control a “star wirter” it is no longer the want to go back the pre crisis any story can happen, it’s up to you which ones really did multiverse.

My reading on the importance of the Zoo Crew was that Nix needed Captain Carrot to complete the army of variant solar-powered Supermen. CC is essentially the Superman of Earth 26/35, is solar-powered, and frankly Morrison is the perverse sort who would insist upon completing the army of multidimensional Supermen with the funny-animal Superman. If there was no Captain Carrot, he probably would’ve invoked Hoppy the Marvel Bunny instead, and Mandrakk withering before the presence of a cartoon rabbit is just the kind of vibe Final Crisis has.

Comprehensive, but could certainly do with some organization.

Thanks for answering Brian and congrats for the impressive work displayed here !

The fact that a FAQ for a comic book limited series results in a page this large is pitiful. To quote the Python players, “My brain hurts.”

Conclusion: Final Crisis will be looked upon as poorly in the future as The Clone Saga is today. Not for the same reasons, mind you, but the disdain will be similar…in a “I can’t believe I bought that stuff” kind of way.

“As mentioned earlier, until I hear otherwise, I’m going with “coloring mistake.”

I dunno if anyone has answered this yet, but Didio has stated for a fact that it was a coloring mistake, and would be corrected for the trade, in a Newsarma interview.

Per the Feb. 13th “20 Questions with Dan DiDio” on Newsarama (http://www.newsarama.com/comics/020913-DiDio20.html), Hawkman and Hawkgirl did *not* die:

“4. When will we learn the fate of Hawkman and Hawkgirl?

“DD: Actually Hawkman and Hawkgirl are recuperating right now from the events of Final Crisis, and they’ll be seen in one or two spots coming up, but they also have a big role in the first part of Blackest Night.”

Wait….Hawkgirl is dead? I could have sworn she was in JLA last week.

I realy wish someone who understood the book (if there is someone) could go panel by panel and explain everything.

this made my brain bleed

Strip club/community center:

I reckon there’s some subtle commentary going on here. Where the Flashes met used to be a community center, but now it’s a (comic) strip club.

In relation to which Earth Kamandi came from, I was under the impression he came from New Earth, as he’s the kid that Karate Kid and the other Legion member met ( I can’t remember her name, Triplicate Girl? Something like that). They met him, along with his grandfather, the original OMAC character from Kirby’s series. In Countdown, I remember him being in a place called Command D, after they left New Earth? If somebody else remembers it more clearly, or more correctly, that would be great, thanks!

Amazing work Brian.

But in defense of Morrison, you suggested above that the inconsistencies between Final Crisis and Death of the New Gods “came as a natural consequence of Starlin writing his series before Morrison wrote his.” But in fact, Morrison wrote the initial FC scripts before both DOTNG and Countdown.

From an interview with Grant:
“We were too far down the road of our own book to reflect everything that went on in Countdown.”
“Why didn’t Superman recount his experiences from DOTNG? Because those experiences hadn’t been thought up or written when I completed Final Crisis #1.”

If I were Grant Morrison, Dan Didio, etc. I would be embarrassed that a FAQ like this existed. The entire concept and execution of this ‘event’ was a total failure. Just read any of the questions above or their answers – complete gibberish.

Jeezum Crow, what a mess. You know a story is over-convoluted if even online summaries can’t explain what the Hell happened…. I’m a 44 year old who still cares about comics, but finds the current state of the DC Universe to be an unreadable ball of utter chaos. Batman’s dead? Sort of. Who cares. Which version of Krypton is the current one? No idea. How I long for the simpler days of single issue stories, lapse continuity and, what was that other thing comics used to traffic in? Oh, yeah…. FUN.

There are a number of fine FC annotations on the intertubes (esp. the ones by a href=”http://www.funnybookbabylon.com/category/reviews/annotations-reviews/”>David Uzumeri and Dougla Wolk).

I nominate Brian to collate ‘em (along with relevant GrantMo interviews), add his own and put together a “definitive” FC companion. Maybe a pdf.

I’d pay a sawbuck for one!

The Hawks are dead?!? Does DC know this? According to Didio, they were just wounded…

“Not to mention that Desaad was supposed to wear high heels under his robe, it’s like he’s saying cross dressers are deviant or just weird enough for Darkseid kind of thing.”

Considering one of the heroes of the Invisibles was a cross dresser, I am pretty confident in saying that Morrison doesn’t think cross-dressing = evil.

On the topic of the Hawk-folk, I think their status is a bit more up in the air than “declared dead.” Morrison and DiDio have been ambiguous on the subject, with the latter stating that “Hawkman is going away for a while.” And in the current Justice Society of America arc, Hawkman appeared in the first issue where he was removed from team leadership. The most recent issue of the same arc noted “after the Darkseid war,” clearly establishing that the current arc is intended to occur post-Final Crisis.

Now, of course, this could just be an editorial mistake (as the first issue, I believe, occurred prior to the release of Final Crisis #7) and Hawkman truly is dead. But I don’t believe it’s been explicitly stated anywhere.

Actually Hawkman and Hawkgirl are recuperating right now from the events of Final Crisis

Given the history of the Hawks, that could simply mean “They are re-incarnating…”

Correction: I’m certain that the original Monitor from COIE IS Mandrakk. Superman says as much in Superman Beyond.

“Wait….Hawkgirl is dead? I could have sworn she was in JLA last week.”

As noted above, writers of the individual series are using their own discretion as to where Final Crisis “slots in.” So in some titles it’s happened (the Batbooks, mainly) whereas with others it hasn’t happened yet.

“Just read any of the questions above or their answers – complete gibberish.”

If that’s gibberish (especially Brian’s concise answers), then so’s pretty much every comic written since the 1930s. And a lot of the questions are based off stuff that was outside the context of the written page itself, EG Morrison interviews or the sketchbook. If anything, people had too much information and were trying to compress all that into a story that ultimately was simpler than a lot of the surrounding marketing would indicate.

This is what I think to be the biggest question —

Isn’t the necessity for a page like this proof of a near-total narrative failure?

If there are so damn many people confused by what happened, doesn’t that reflect poorly on the writer of the series?

“You know a story is over-convoluted if even online summaries can’t explain what the Hell happened…. ”

Darkseid tried to conquer Earth. He was stopped, but by losing he allowed a greater threat to emerge. That threat was stopped as well.

There you go.

This Q&A perfectly illustrates what an embarrassing, colossal boondoggle the whole FC series was. It was so damn stupid… I can’t believe someone actually wrote it.

Nice one, Stephen!
:D

I heard Mandrakk IS the original monitor, that after he “died” in the 1st crisis, he came back knowing he would become evil, and set the “Superman Beyond giant Superman robot” plan in motion because he knew all this was going to happen.

“It’s currently collected in the Batman RIP hardcover.”

Oh. Well, I’m going to be getting that, so that takes care of it, I guess.

As David Uzumeri pointed out above, Brian misplaced LoTW. Should look like this according to Grant:

The Entire Reading Order

Final Crisis #1
Final Crisis: Rage of the Red Lanterns #1
Final Crisis: Requiem #1
Final Crisis #2
Final Crisis: Rogues’ Revenge #1-3
Final Crisis #3
Final Crisis: Superman Beyond #1-2
Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #1-5
Final Crisis: Revelations #1-5
Final Crisis: Resist #1
Final Crisis: Submit #1
Final Crisis #4-5
Final Crisis: Secret Files #1 (any time, really, but I guess around this time makes the most sense)
Batman #682-683
Final Crisis #6-7

Wait — I thought the FINAL CRISIS HC was only going to contain FC #1-7 with none of the supplementary issues/ tie-ins. That’s how it was originally solicited, which evoked an uproar of disagreement from myself and many others. Have DC seen the light and amended the solicitation info?

Isn’t the necessity for a page like this proof of a near-total narrative failure?

Maybe it was necessary for everyone. It wasn’t for me, or a lot of other people, so I still have trouble believing the narrative was at fault.

That should be IF it was necessary for everyone. Goddamn lack of edit feature.

A couple of possible alternatives, not quite “corrections:”

Re: Libra’s role, Tattooed Man and the Dark Side Club. Given that the Mad Hatter was involved in the abduction of children by Boss Dark Side and the construction of the Justifier helmets, and that we see Libra assembling the Secret Society of Super-Villains prior to the events of FC #1, it seems obvious to me that Libra’s role was to assemble the Society to use as Darkseid’s (unwitting) henchmen. Note that this was the origin of the original Secret Society, which Darkseid convened by proxy to serve as a bigger, badder Intergang way back in SSoSV #1 in 1970-whatever.

Second, Libra is a perverse sort of “balance” in the sense that the DC Universe, as established implicitly in countless comics and explicitly in Morrison’s JLA: Earth-2, is a universe where “good always wins.” It’s balanced in theory by the antimatter universe where evil always wins, but the antimatter Earth lost its balancing power in Kurt Busiek’s “Syndicate Rules” arc of JLA some time back due to its destruction and recreation with differences in Busiek’s Avengers/JLA series.

So Libra, the guy who founded the original “dark mirror” of the JLA, the Injustice Gang of the World, is Darkseid’s — and evil’s — response to the “moral imbalance” they perceive in the multiverse. The SSOSV is meant to counter the heroes, and by helping Darkseid win for all time, Libra thinks he’s “balancing” the good-evil duality of the DC multiverse. And indeed, Libra does indeed give the “evil winning is balance” spiel in FC #1. He just deliberately leaves out the bigger picture of balancing eveyrthing by giving it ALL over to an ultimate evil he serves.

Of course, they’re both wrong about that balance and its nature, and Superman’s right: the multiiverse must go on, its stories always “To Be Continued.” And this is why evil has to lose in the end, because evil destroys things and ends all stories when it does win. And so the real balance of things is preserved by the Flash’s restoration to counteract Darkseid’s scheme (and by extension, Libra’s return).

In short, Libra buys into a phony notion of balance provided by Darkseid in which evil should get its turn at winning, and they’re both wrong so they lose.

Darkseid the Singularity. A singularity is basically an infinitely dense point in spacetime, one with effectively infinite mass. Darkseid is to the DC multiverse’s story a sort of impossible obstacle, refusing by sheer force of will and evilness to move aside so that the story — DCU spacetime — can keep going. Instead, he warps it horribly by falling through the Bleed and then still not going away. He’s a singularity in the metafictional spacetime the Monitors feed upon and “monitor,” and it’s always the Monitors who call him a singularity. He’s not a physical black hole in any really meaningful sense, just a black hole so far as the story of the DCU and its natural progress and terrain are concerned. And remember, a black hole is in many accounts the superdense remnant of a collapsed star…or in this case, the untenable remnant of a collapsed “star” villain character in a story that’s otherwise moved on.

Nathan
February 24, 2009 at 12:40 pm
In relation to which Earth Kamandi came from, I was under the impression he came from New Earth, as he’s the kid that Karate Kid and the other Legion member met ( I can’t remember her name, Triplicate Girl? Something like that). They met him, along with his grandfather, the original OMAC character from Kirby’s series. In Countdown, I remember him being in a place called Command D, after they left New Earth? If somebody else remembers it more clearly, or more correctly, that would be great, thanks!
————————————————————-
The Kamandi that Karate Kid and Una met was from New Earth. Later however when they showed the Great Disaster, that was the Kamandi and his grandfather on Earth-51 where the Great Disaster occurs ….

I appreciate the effort that went into this, but the FAQ was almost as incomprehensible as the mini-series it’s about. The same question is posed five or six times, while others that really do require an answer to make sense of everything are dismissed with the good ol’ “time distortions” answer. And seriously, please. Aren’t we all adult enough to just call out editorial incompetence when we see it? I refuse to believe that something like Mr. Terrific or the Question’s completely contradictory appearances in this series were intended to demonstrate the effect of Darkseid’s fall. They were what they were: the editor not having a clue what was going on with all the various parts of this storyline. It seems editorial STILL doesn’t know what happened, as DiDio himself has said that the Hawks are alive, but Cronin seems pretty confident that they’re dead.

You can dress it up and make all the excuses you like. It still doesn’t change the fact that Final Crisis is one of the most poorly told stories in comic history. A writer should not leave the various fates of important (and even not important) characters “up to reader interpretation.” Almost nothing in issue 7 makes any sense. (If Superman “fixed” New Earth using the Miracle Machine, why is is still so badly damaged?) I lost a lot of faith in Grant Morrison after this boondoggle, and even more in DC Comics in general.

The inevitably detail-oriented nature of a FAQ built from questions submitted by individual users means a lot of the focus in the questions was on things that weren’t really important to the enjoyment of the story. You didn’t need to know which Monitor Mandrakk was to understand why he was the villain that appeared after Darkseid’s “triumph”, what happens with Darkseid is fairly standard for a depiction of a dying god, and the final fate of the Hawks is not particularly relevant to anything.

Much of the bulk is also due to Brian choosing to repeat questions in full so he could recognize (as far as I can tell) every individual who submitted a question, even when questions were wordy or repetitious. You could easily reduce the FAQ’s length to about a third or a fourth of the current wordcount by just rewriting the questions in more concise terms and removing the repetitions. The answers are almost always very brief and straightforward, so I don’t think the document’s length is a necessary function of failures in the material it’s describing.

Possible solution to the hairy handed Rubik’s Cube solver is that it might be Aurakles, the immortal caveman superhero recreated for Morrison’s Seven Soldier’s minis & rescued from Darkseid by Mr. Miracle 2.

I appreciate the effort that went into this, but the FAQ was almost as incomprehensible as the mini-series it’s about.

No worries, Brian will be doing an FAQ for the benefit of the people who didn’t understand this FAQ.

But that’s it, anything after that would be silly.

Great FAQ, thanks for all the data

The only quibble I’d have is that I think Morrison intends for the original Kathy Kane Batwoman to have genuinely existed in New Earth continuity.

52 established that the new Kate Kane has an older relative of the same name, and the original Batwoman is mentioned in both the first issue of ‘Batman and Son’ and the third issue of ‘RIP’.

Yea, Kathy Kane Batwoman does exist in New Earth Continuity. No delusion, no wiped-out-Earth-1 Kathy.

I thought asking some questions and seeing how you’d answer them was supposed to be fun–and reading your responses was fun. I guess I should have known that others would treat it differently. First they demand that someone explain the thing to them, because it sucks.. Then, once it was explained, they say that the existance of the explanation itself proves that it sucks. Hmmm.

I really liked Final Crisis and had a good time thinking about it. For me, it really works as part of Morrison’s grand metaphor of superheroes as the power of the imagination to bring about transformation. There is a better world out there. There must be. Imaginative stories are the hopes and dreams and wishes of mankind and as long as we’ve got them, we’ve got a chance at transforming ourselves and the world.

Good work, mate!
I knew everything that was being questioned, but this was still an entertaining read!
I really, really like the ‘Kamandi appearing at different points in time’ business.

Actually, I’ve been trying to think what that reminds me of- In the Marvel series ‘The Call of Duty’, there was a little girl being sent to different points in the past by her crazed father to warn the characters of a coming disaster.

I love Final Crisis.

Brian, thx for answering my questions! i think the strip club i asked about was actually at the end of DC Universe #0… does that sound right? anyway, you definitely answered the questions well. i’m still totally confused about the Darkseid falling thru time thing though, probably because i didn’t read Starlin’s Death mini.

I wouldn’t say that the length of this FAQ means that the whole series was a failure. Many of Alan Moore’s works require lengthy FAQs. The difference is that most of Moore’s works (and I’m particularly thinking of LOEG) can be easily read and understood without the need for a FAQ; the deeper meanings or allusions just add to the enjoyment of the work. The problem in “FC” is that it’s hard to decipher the whole book without reading at least online interviews with Morrison and/or Didio, FAQs, etc. I didn’t even know the last issue was told out of order until I read this FAQ. I just assumed I didn’t understand what was going on in some panels. The job of the editors/company is to make sure the reader can follow the work. Was it ever said in an issue of “FC” that issue #7 takes place out of order? I have no problem with Morrison’s works being dense & requiring tons of prior DC knowledge. “Seven Soldiers” certainly did. The difference is that “Final Crisis” was billed as DC’s big crossover book of the year; therefore, it should be accessible to everyone, even non-DC readers. This is the job of the editors; they’re supposed to see the book through the average readers eyes. If something isn’t understandable, add an insert box explaining it, make the art more clear, or ask for a rewrite. I don’t know why comics can’t make reference to old issues or things that have happened before like I grew up on. It certainly helps with projects like this. Overall, I think “Final Crisis” has some brilliant ideas, but the execution leaves a lot to be desired. And that’s a shame because I think most of the ideas, characters, etc. explored in the series will be largely ignored or forgotten due to muddiness of the finished product.

[…] Final Crisis FAQ. Posted on February 24, 2009 by hellionsmagazine Click HERE. […]

…Just want to go on the record that this, quite franky, was the best and most concise attempt to do an FAQ for something as conbefuddled as FC was. Going as far as to answer *everybody’s* questions even if a lot of them were repeated was a damn fine move as well, and considering that some things Morrisson tried to do need to be hammered in repeatedly in hopes of understanding what he tried to get across as well as what he clearly lied about changing in mid-stream(*), those repeat answers were necessary.

Again, damn fine job. A lot more detailed than you’d find over on Matty Brady’s former sandbox!

(*) Too many reports of the whole last half of the series being rewritten at least twice exist for it not to have happened. FC wasn’t The Grassy Knoll, kids, so there were at least two shooters involved in this mess as well as a conspiracy *and* a lone nutjob screwing things up.

Wow, judging from these comments there sure are a lot of comic book editors reading this! Oh wait, these comments are just from people who presume they know how to do Eddie Berganza’s job better than he does.

For those hoping for a more exact explanation of Batman’s whereabouts…

I read the final panel as referencing Anthro. Anthro is dying and passes off his chalk to Batman, thus Batman is stuck at the dawn of time, totally unencumbered by any continuity.

I think, though, that any continuity focused questions regarding Final Crisis are misguided. After all, Final Crisis is a story about the destruction of the monitors; beings whose only purpose are to order the stories of the DC universe and who consequently suck the life out of those stories. In other words, Final Crisis represents an end to continuity’s choke hold over DC’s stories.

I’m pretty sure that Didio stated neither Hawkman nor HAwkwoman are Dead.
They aren’t shown killed just caught in what appears to be a fiery explosion of some sort.

First they demand that someone explain the thing to them, because it sucks.. Then, once it was explained, they say that the existance of the explanation itself proves that it sucks. Hmmm.

How do you know the people who complained about needing it explained to them are the same ones complaining that the existence of an explanation proves that it sucks?

I’m of the latter camp for example in thinking that if it requires this much outside explanation, annotations and preliminary reading just to be understood then it fails. However I’m not of the former camp of ever asking anyone to explain it to me as I felt the 7 issues I read were so lacking in entertainment value, so disjointed in narrative and so in love with it’s own metatextual aspirations that I had no desire to have it explained to me. I just chalked it up as an ambitious but ultimately failed narrative experiment for a crossover event and moved on. (However I do not think it failed as a cult book for Morrison junkies. If marketed as a fringe book instead of as a tentpole crossover event that would have been fine)

One addition/clarification to your “red skies” answer. Morrison, in both the main FC book and Superman Beyond, expands on Ellis’ Bleed concept. Whereas Ellis uses “Bleed” in the printing/layout sense (the space or margin beyond the story), Morrison adds another layer by making it the lifeblood of the multiverse. Hence several characters commenting on the sky bleeding or blood raining in the main FC series and the musings on the Monitors’ vampirism in Superman Beyond.

Yes, perhaps this was already implicit in Ellis’ Stormwatch/Authority but, except for the actual coloring of the Bleed (which could simply have been Laura Martin nee DePuy’s idea), I don’t recall any reference to the Bleed as a life essence or blood of the multiverse.

My guess is that this was the “big reveal” on the red skies that Morrison was referring to in the interview, as simply having it turn out to be the Bleed doesn’t seem terribly earth-shattering or even new.

Hello All,

Need some advice. Final Crisis sounds confusing but intriguing (I have enjoyed Morrison’s work in the past).

I am fairly unfamiliar with the DCU — but I own and definitely have enjoyed the following (in TPB):
– Gail Simone’s entire run on BoP
– Geoff Johns’ run on GL through the Sinestro Corps War
– Gotham Central, entire series
– A few odds and ends of Batman and Superman

(The low points in the BoP and GL runs for me were the One Year Later interludes. It felt like both titles were going great, and were set back greatly by the One Year Later gap. Similar to what Marvel is doing to the Ms. Marvel title right now, actually.)

My question — what books/runs does anyone recommend to try and get into the DCU more? I thought about trying the trades of 52 next…or will I be too lost trying to start there? If I start with 52, and go on to Countdown, will that be enough of a background to get even a fraction of the references in FC?

Seems like there is a lot of good in the DCU, just need to find the right jumping-on point, and don’t want to waste money on the wrong trades to do so. Thanks!

Just to chime in on the Shilo Norman coloring issue.
In Seven Soldiers of Victory, He does appear to have a white-colored faceplate of some type when he is in costume. So that’s probably where the colorist used as reference for his “color” scheme.

“Did Hawkman and Hawkgirl die? Why? What were they doing?”

“Yes, they died. In an attempt to save people, Checkmate created a dimensional tunnel between universes. It began breaking down, and Lord Eye tried to close it, which would have killed all the people still in the tunnel. The Hawks blew it up, but died in the explosion that destroyed it. Luckily, Mister Miracle was able to save the remaining folks with a last second Boom Tube. Interestingly enough, Hawkman’s fiery death was actually foretold in last year’s Hawkman Special by Jim Starlin. Odd that that special actually ended up being tying into Final Crisis like that.”

I’m pretty sure Didio mentioned in one of his “20 Questions” interview that the Hawks were alive and just recuperating but I’m not really sure. If that bit of info wasn’t in the back of my head I’d be inclined to agree wholeheartedly based on the reading alone that they did die, I mean there was even a feather as a symbol for them when the pages started to white out.

I’ll amend by saying that any of these answers that came from the Morrison interviews are unfair and completely irrelevant. I didn’t read them, but I sure hope he didn’t explain anyything about the plot or meaning of this series. Once it’s published on the page, our interpretations of the work as presented are as valid as the author’s (probably moreso as a writer is likely less likely to be able to separate himself from what he meant vs. what is on the page).

I was assuming that many of these responses were creative readings and interpretations. If they’re not and are instead Morrison’s explanations, then no, bogus.

…if any of these *are* answers that came from…

No, it’s better the first way. Sheesh.

OK, I’ve read this thing a few times and I’m still not really sure on most of it. But I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that FC is the worst comic ever made. Ninety percent of the time I had no idea what was going on. Barry Alen’s return should have been a big deal, but in the series he just happens to be there. When there were changes between scenes I couldn’t tell. Characters popped up seemingly out of nowhere with no explaination. If there are going to be tie-ins that are critical to the storyline readers should be given that information. Usually when there’s a tie-in the story is just a lame attempt tp boost sales. The story usually doesn’t have that big of an impact on the main story. Here there were obviously important developements taking place in other books. Would it have been so horrible to put some notations of issues that these events took place? I understand that Morrison was trying to do something different here but the result was way too abstract IMO. The editors involved with this series really dropped the ball.

I hope the next crisis is better.

Thanks for doing this FAQ, Brian! It added to my appreciation of the series, and clarrified a couple story points.

I like how Nix Uotan is Dax Novu’s son. Not because it was ordained to be so, but because, as he says, “how could he be anything but.”

Just another awesome example of story infecting the Monitor world.

Also, I’m pretty sure Morrison himself said that the New Gods aren’t on Earth 51; in fact, there’s no indication that they are, other than that the panel of Earth 51 is followed by the New Gods going to New Genesis (not an Earth) in Final Crisis #7. Morrison refers to the New Gods as going to a “newly fashioned Kirby Earth,” which isn’t necessarily Earth 51. But will probably just end up that way. :-)

Oops, the IGN interview definitively says they’re on Earth 51. You can ignore my last statement re: the New Gods.

Just to make the point: Countdown ran 52 issues, an entire year, then half a dozen lead-up books at least, then a “crossover” that is completely disjointed…how much money did following this “event” cost? At least $200.

I found it totally confusing and I have to say it was a waste of money. Grant Morrison should be embarrassed.

Brian, I don’t have my issues with me otherwise I’d look myself, but where in Final Crisis did you get that Kamandi’s appearances were the result of Nix Uotan manipulation? I think when I was first reading it I chalked it up to more of Metron’s meddling, but I was never too clear on that.

I had to buy a guidebook to help understand Ulysses better. James Joyce should be embarrassed.

I had to buy a guidebook to help understand Ulysses better. James Joyce should be embarrassed.

If Ulysses was meant to be a top-selling mass market blockbuster popular novel, than yet he should be. But it wasn’t.

Brian, I don’t have my issues with me otherwise I’d look myself, but where in Final Crisis did you get that Kamandi’s appearances were the result of Nix Uotan manipulation?

It was hinted at in Final Crisis #7 (where Nix is talking about creating/fixing Earth-51 and Kamandi mentions seeing visions of other times and places), but Morrison later confirmed it in an interview.

[…] hurt, CBR’s Comics Should Be Good Blog is here to help.  Brian Cronin has created a running FAQ to make things clear, give it a […]

Calling Final Crisis a failure as a comic book because some people don’t understand it, or because it can lead to lengthy discussions of it consequences and implications is like calling Ulysses by James Joyce or Guernica by Pablo Picasso failures. Morrison attempted to push an art form past the limits mainstream audiences have come to expect. Sadly, but not unexpectedly, his efforts have been met with disdain. I trust future audiences will view his efforts with a bit more respect.

Yes, I do realize the implications of my comparisons and stand by them.

Damn. Someone beat me to my Ulysses reference.

To Toby:

FC is a kind of culmination of ALL Morrison’s DCU work. eg It returns to and re-examines some ideas in his excellent JLA run; ‘Rock of Ages’ and ‘World War III’ in particular. But FC is removed from this run as well and slightly contradicts it in thow the New Gods are depicted in each.

Actually the whole run of Morrison’s JLA is just a brilliant, accessible superhero epic, and well worth your time anyway.

To get closer to the actual content of FC, a read of Animal Man 1-26 will help an understanding of the Superman Beyond sections (essential to reading FC, as Brian says). Superman revisits ground Animal explored at the very beginning of Morrison’s DC career. In some ways Morrison never improved on what he said in Animal Man and how he said it. Its a gem, in my view.

Animal Man itself is a strange sort of sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths, which really kicked off the great arc that FC brings to a close. Its a long slog, but it shows you the huge variety of the DCU that the first Crisis wiped away and which Morrison is trying to bring back with FC. It also introduces the Monitors.

Getting closer to FC in time we come to the books that Morrison wrote partially to prepare the ground for FC. The true lead-in to FC is Seven Soldiers of Victory, the 2005 maxi-series, in particular the Mister Miracle sections. Darkseid’s pre-Turpin human form and manipulations behind the scene from the Dark Side club only get a few panels in FC, but they are fleshed out here.

52 is a great read and a mad exploration of all the various facets of the DCU. It ties in with FC mainly thematically by showing you how weird and wonderful the DCU can be with the right approach. And it intentionally only uses B and C-list characters. The Question plays a big role.

The multiverse status quo is set up which FC carries on from.

I would have to stress DO NOT READ Countdown and Death of the New Gods as preparation for reading Final Crisis. They contradicted things which happened in FC before any FC was even published. The Monitors and the New Gods and Mary Marvel all appear doing things which sorta lead into FC #1, but once Final Crisis gets going, the events in those books might as well have been on a parrallel universe. They don’t set up Final Crisis at all. Repeat DO NOT READ THEM!

Its a big project you’re undertaking and there is much Morrisonian side-alleys along the way, but you’ll have fun reading a lot of them for the first time.

RE: “If Ulysses was meant to be a top-selling mass market blockbuster popular novel, than yet he should be. But it wasn’t.”

I’m sure Mr. Joyce wasn’t interested in commercial success at all. Right.

Um When did Hawkman and Hawkgirl die? I missed that.

Chewbacca –

Thank you very much for the suggestions! That definitely helps me know what to pick up and what to avoid. I think I’ll start with Crisis on Infinite Earths and the early Morrison books (between his New X-Men run and things like We3, he’s never let me down yet) and then maybe tackle 52 and so on. Will avoid Countdown and Death of the New Gods. Appreciate the help!

Brian, thanks to you also for this great reference — I will keep this bookmarked for future reference for sure. Great stuff.

Cheers!
Toby

I’m sure Mr. Joyce wasn’t interested in commercial success at all. Right.

Yes Joyce wanted it to be successful and make a living, but do you really think Ulysses was commissioned to be written by a large publisher with intentions of being a major mainstream commercial blockbuster the way Final Crisis was by DC? The goals of each are not comparable, the aims of each are different, just like the commercial and accessibility goals of a Harry Potter book are different than those of a Thomas Pynchon book.

Ulysses was originally published as a serial in a monthly magazine. I think the goal of telling a story is the same no matter what author or genre.

I thought Final Crisis was a refreshing break from big summer events that do nothing to create thought in their readers. I understand that it didn’t appeal to everyone, nor should it.

The reason I get upset over some of the criticism is it seems to me that a vocal portion of the comic audience is confirming what non-comic readers already think: comic books are for kids, with no real meaning or any valid message to convey beyond a simple good vs. evil morality play.

I have my own problems with Final Crisis, but they have to do with thematic elements, not the attempt to deliver complex themes in my favorite storytelling medium.

“The goals of each are not comparable”

I think that depends on what the goals really were. Final Crisis was never designed to be a major comic book universe crossover. It was SOLD as major crossover, but that clearly wasn’t its goal. It say that it fails as a work because of what it was sold as is like saying that Ulysses would suddenly become a failure if you sold it as airport fiction.

Final Crisis wasn’t what it was sold as. It clearly failed as major crossover. But I can’t see how that automatically means it fails at everything. You could say that it is an economic fraud to sell something as something else, but that doesn’t change its artistic value.

Someone on another website said that Final Crisis was like ordering a pie and getting a hot dog, and they were right. However the fact that you wanted a pie and promised a pie doesn’t actually effect how the hot dog tastes. It is completely fair to say that Final Crisis wasn’t what you ordered and therefore you don’t like it, but that doesn’t change the book itself.

The goal of Final Crisis doesn’t come from the author or the publisher or the ads. The goal comes from the text itself. Final Crisis the sales event may have been a fraud but Final Crisis the book should stand or fall on its own terms.

Wow Brain. Thanks for doing this. I know i had lots of questions. Turns out i knew half the answers. Now stuff makes sense, i just think there’s things i don’t like. Freeze shrinking the population on earth? Really? But I understand what Morrison seems to be doing. I HATE the Zoo Crew. To me they are exceedingly silly and have no place in DC Proper. But with this being a story about stories, I think Morrison is saying, “Maybe they are silly. But what gives you the right to wipe them from existence? Just because you can, if you wrote the story? Just because YOU don’t like them?” This seems to be something Morrison has always pushed, by embracing silver age stories and introducing Limbo.

Final Crisis also happened to be DC’s best-selling comic book title last year (EDITED TO ADD: Posted this at the same time as muffinpeddlar, just in case anyone thought it was somehow a response to his comment :) ).

And yes, muffinpeddlar, I believe that’s exactly what he is saying with regards to the Zoo Crew.

There are so many errors and opinions in this so-called “FAQ” I think it was somewhat irresponsible. I hope people just closely read Final Crisis and gather the facts for themselves rather than rely on someone whose opinion is less insightful than many others and who made many obvious factual errors.

Hi Brian,

I’m a retailer in Largo, Florida. I have a couple of questions. Primarily, I’m wondering where you got this info that you are sharing with us? CBR is very reputable and I appreciate all your effort. A lot of my customers felt confused by FC, and many felt betrayed, believing this was going to be a more straightforward story than the complex metaphysical-quasireligious and philosophical metaphor it seemed to become which was addressing the nature of god and the multiverse vs. the creative process, the heroes, and their place in that ‘reality’ i.e. their ‘realization’ that the universe is a story, and therefore, to save reality, Superman wishes for ‘a happy ending’ from the Miracle Machine.

I believe Dan Didio made several comments that FC would spin off of Countdown, that it was a COIE sequel and final chapter, and that fans would be satisfied with the outcome that gave them a clear and concise DCU from the conclusion of FC forward. Most people don’t feel that way. I would like to read some of Dan’s interviews, though. Is there a link to them that you could send me?

Much thanks.
Pat

Brian, nice work. Two things. I thought Libra turned out to be the anti-life equation. As in the human embodiment of anti-life. This stems from when Luthor says, “Libra was the anti-life equation and now he’s not” in FC 7. Of course Lex may just be talking about how Libra had control over the justifiers and now he does instead. This would explain how he resisted the spectre though. And Grant did say who Libra turns out to be is important.

Also any insight on the digital hand writing ‘Know Evil’ on the wall in FC #3?

Omar Karindu, back from an Internet Thogal ritual

February 24, 2009 at 10:03 pm

The digital hand is a reference to the Uni-Friend, the fiery hand that writes on the wall on New Genesis with oracular pronouncements straight from the Source.

Brian – THANKS for the FAQ!

Spike – how is trying to answer questions people have about a comic book irresponsible? Not feeding your kids is irresponsible. Of course all Brian can do is give his opinions; he didn’t write Final Crisis! Creating a FAQ on a comic book site is helpful, unlike your comments.

…I was going to comment on some of the answers, but in the end felt that there are way too many cop-outs, unknown facts, and things that just plain don’t make sense. Thanks for trying, Brian, but when a comic requires a FAQ to be understood, and even THAT FAQ leaves things unclear, it cannot be called anything but a failure. I blame DC’s poor editorial staff- both for mismanaging the crossovers and for failing to rein in Morrison when he went too far. :(

I have a question: The villains set off a bomb in the Daily Planet to take Superman out of the action. Now, a bomb is not a precision weapon. Logically, Lois should have been killed by the huge explosion. Instead, she is critically wounded, conveniently requiring Superman’s constant vigil. So how did Libra know the bomb wouldn’t kill her, thus sending a vengeful Superman on a quest to track down the murderers? And also, did Libra know Superman is Clark Kent, or just that Superman is friends with people who work at the Daily Planet?

Brian, it’s official: I like you WAY more than I like Morrison. There’s still that teensy-weensy question of just what a devolved Captain Carrot and the Zoo Crew could possibly be good for other than fouling the carpeting, but you certainly have gone a long way to answering some of the really mind-numbingly jarring stuff in this wreck.

Thank you for your efforts.

I have a question: The villains set off a bomb in the Daily Planet to take Superman out of the action. Now, a bomb is not a precision weapon. Logically, Lois should have been killed by the huge explosion. Instead, she is critically wounded, conveniently requiring Superman’s constant vigil. So how did Libra know the bomb wouldn’t kill her, thus sending a vengeful Superman on a quest to track down the murderers? And also, did Libra know Superman is Clark Kent, or just that Superman is friends with people who work at the Daily Planet?

I think they’d be fine with it killing Lois. The idea was just to keep Superman occupied one way or the other.

And I think the scene works whether they just know that Superman is friendly with the Daily Planet folks (which is common knowledge) or if they know he is Clark Kent.

Two more things:

1) Hawkman and Hawkgirl didn’t die; at least not in Dan DiDio’s eyes.

http://www.newsarama.com/comics/020913-DiDio20.html

2) Although Final Crisis might not have sold as much as Secret Invasion (the big event it’s being compared to), it at least held onto it’s readers better.

Secret Invasion #1 of 8 – 272,195
Secret Invasion #2 of 8 – 197,685
Secret Invasion #3 of 8 – 186,533
Secret Invasion #4 of 8 – 175,469
Secret Invasion #5 of 8 – 165,958
Secret Invasion #6 of 8 – 169,440
Secret Invasion #7 of 8 – 154,675
Secret Invasion #8 of 8 – 152,429
Total Reader Loss – 44%

Final Crisis #1 of 7 – 144,826
Final Crisis #2 of 7 – 126,082
Final Crisis #3 of 7 – 123,881
Final Crisis #4 of 7 – 115,666
Final Crisis #5 of 7 – 109,181
Final Crisis #6 of 7 – 110,858
Final Crisis #7 of 7 – 103,261
Total Reader Loss – 26.6%

That’s fascinating, Jack, about the drop-off, thanks.

1) Hawkman and Hawkgirl didn’t die; at least not in Dan DiDio’s eyes.

Well, in his defense, Didio’s a busy guy. He probably hasn’t had time to read the FAQ yet.

I think the fact that there have been so many questions that needed clarifying about this series (with even more arriving in the comments) just highlights what a sprawling mess it was. Didio has a lot to answer for.

I’m a fanboy as much as anyone. I bought all the FC issues, all of Countdown, and all of 52. I like COIE and Animal Man, and even *used to* think Grant Morrison was on a level with, say, Alan Moore. But to compare FC to Ulysses is simply ridiculous. Grant Morrison is not a literary giant…he is a comic book writer, and a disappointing one at that because he does not *communicate* what happens to these characters he supposedly “reveres”. It is a self-indulgent mess. But I can see how someone who invested two or three hundred dollars in following this story would get defensive about its shortcomings. Short answer: don’t drink the Kool-Aid.

Wait, Kathy Kane’s back in continuity? Does that mean that Flamebird was the original Batgirl as well?

I know A version of Kathy Kane exists as in the Beast Boy mini froma few years ago, Flamebird confirms that her crimefighting career is funded by an eccentric “Aunt Kathy”.

James Joyce is seen as a literary giant because of Ulysees, he wasn’t beforehand.

But you’re right, they can’t be compared. Why? Because the two literary forms are completely different, from storytelling process to business models, they’re not even remotely similar.

And back to my previous post, if Bette Kane is the original Batgirl again, what does that mean for Oracle? And will Flamebird take that mantle back?

So, because Final Crisis is a comic book, and Grant Morrison is a comic book writer, his artistic endeavors are less worthy of respect? You need to think about how you view the comic book as an art form and storytelling medium.

Business models are not an excuse for artistic criticism. Yes, there was a failure in marketing. I see no such failure in the storytelling. Even if I hadn’t paid a dime for Final Crisis, I would still view it as a major achievement in how a shared superhero comic universe can be used to express complex ideas.

Wow, FINAL CRISIS needed this kind of FAQ, Brian. Thanks very much for the effort – most especially in clarifying the Monitors’ situation. :)

One thing, though:


“Are the Super Young Team the “Forever People of the 5th World”?”

It certainly appears that way, doesn’t it?

……..several of the Forever People themselves show up at the end of FINAL CRISIS #7, hovering over Earth 51 along with Lightray, Highfather and Mr. Miracle (the classic look, so it’s probably Scott Free) & Big Barda.

Not sure about Hawkman being dead — DiDio has mentioned that he’s back and I’ve seen him in JSA since Infinite Crisis. I think it was in one of the Ask Dan columns at Newsarama that Dan specifically said that Hawkman isn’t dead.

I wasn’t criticising Final Crisis – I actually like it. I was just pointing out how a previous thread of argument was both flawed and unfair to the subject matter on both sides.

Oh yeah, and I though that the Captain Marvel that fought Mary was Earth-0 Freddie Freeman, not Earth-5 Billy

“Unfortunately, just the fact that the series needed something like this to make some sense of it, shows how poorly constructed and produced it actually was.”–Yeah. Never mind that some of the great classics of literature have entire semester-long courses devoted to dissecting, discussing, and explicating them. Clearly, a work of art that requires some thinking from the reader just sucks.

Don’t ever read a book.

Graeme White-

Most of that was not directed at you, just a reaction to the negative response to this story.

Yeah. Never mind that some of the great classics of literature have entire semester-long courses devoted to dissecting, discussing, and explicating them. Clearly, a work of art that requires some thinking from the reader just sucks.

Don’t ever read a book.

I think that’s a bit specious, Jono11 – literary academic analysis and discussion is about unearthing what the story is about, whereas many of the complaints regarding FC and the questions in this FAQ are along the lines of “What was the story?”. The existence of this FAQ and Brian’s responses bear this out as a reasonable criticism. I’ve seen very little scholastic-type analysis of the story (It’s about the power of fiction/stories/imagination, yes?) but I’ve seen a lot of ‘Read these two other comics and this Morrison interview to understand what happened in FC# 5, and also this miniseries, but don’t take what the miniseries says as gospel.’ which is hardly comparable to the sort of in-depth dissection you refer to. Time will tell if FC will garner that sort of attention, but I personally think Morrison’s written far worthier and more substantial things.

Many complaints about Final Crisis #1-7, including my own, are about it lacking the basic information to make sense of the story – that doesn’t make people who disliked it for that reason a pack of cretins, it makes them a group of readers who feel that the writer let them and the story down by not providing information crucial to understanding that story in the damn story itself. If an audience needed to read a tie-in book to make sense of what happened in between FC #6 and FC #7, than the series should have been lengthened to eight issues and the tie-in book published as #7. If supplemental material becomes essential material, it should not be treated as the former – if it is integral to the primary story, it should be included in the primary story, which is where many of the criticisms and accusations of DC bungling its production are coming from.

While I disagree with the comparison to Ulysses on both qualitative and media-based grounds, I’ll borrow it for an example: You don’t have to read Dubliners or PotAaaYM to understand Stephen Daedalus’ inclusion in Ulysses – though they are helpful as supplemental materials – and Joyce didn’t have to write Ulysses: Molly Bloom Resist? Yeah, Right to get the thing.

layne,

I can accept your argument about tie-ins being necessary for full understanding of the narrative. However, I’m willing to bet that those decisions were not up to the author of the work. If Joyce were writing today, you can bet his other novels would be marketed as tie-ins, prequels, or whatever when Ulysses was released.

The work of DC Comics in packaging and marketing this story has notjing to do with Morrison or the story itself.

WOW…. thank you for taking the time to do this!!!!!!

There have been many great comics that are extremely great art. Yes there are classes that center on certain works and you get to study genres and things like that……but I can read The Great Gatsby, Pride and Prejudice, The Caine Mutiny, etc without taking a course and understand and enjoy these works. Yes there are probably things I can learn outside these books that enhance the story, but they can stand on their own.

FC can’t. Even with all the tie-ins expalined, even now knowing that some parts were not in chronological order, it’s still a bad comic book. It’s worse than Secret Wars 2 and the Clone Saga. Years from now we will refer to FC like we refer to the Clone Saga.

I think they’d be fine with it killing Lois. The idea was just to keep Superman occupied one way or the other.

Hi, I don’t want to drag this out, but I have to disagree. With Lois murdered, Superman would be on a mission of vengeance. He would track down Libra and the rest and kick the crap out of them (nonlethally), even if she were his friend rather than wife. And he would not be too occupied to fight Darkseid and his enslavement of humanity. It’s like Morrison had Libra arrange precisely that Lois would be injured enough so that she would need Superman to focus his infrared vision on her 24-7. And that doesn’t make sense to me, not if the weapon is a bomb.

Sorry, I don’t know how to quote a previous post properly.

Nobody seems to have seen my question the first time I posted it, or you don’t care to answer, so I’m reposting it in the hopes that some of you will stop sniping back and forth and perhaps contribute some insight into this.

Here’s my original post:

Wait — I thought the FINAL CRISIS HC was only going to contain FC #1-7 with none of the supplementary issues/ tie-ins. That’s how it was originally solicited, which evoked an uproar of disagreement from myself and many others. Have DC seen the light and amended the solicitation info?

“Yeah. Never mind that some of the great classics of literature have entire semester-long courses devoted to dissecting, discussing, and explicating them. Clearly, a work of art that requires some thinking from the reader just sucks.

Don’t ever read a book.”

I LOVE YOU

Thanks so much, joshschr! This bit of news completely escaped my attention, and it didn’t seem to be widely publicized, which baffles me given the confounding initial solicitation. Still, that’s great news, and I can look forward to buying as close to a complete package as I need and reading the whole think in one go.

Yeah, the solicits I saw didn’t explicitly say that SB was going to be included, but I agree with BC’s bit of mathmagic and latin.

Brian – Hey, my pleasure. I’m always up for stealing sales data and reposting it here.

Now, one thing I wanted to address was this point, made by layne.

Many of the complaints regarding FC and the questions in this FAQ are along the lines of “What was the story?”

Honestly, what was so hard to understand?

Villain attacks Earth, Villain wins, the Heroes fight back.

If what people are asking is, “What happened in all those really fast bits where there’s lots of characters doing things,” then they’re not asking what the story is, they’re asking for a detailed plot summary.

All of reality is threatened when the Evil God Darkseid is reborn into a human body; he unleashes the anti-life equation onto the world, converting most of humanity and meta-humanity into slaves. Batman is captured, Superman disappears, Wonder Woman is converted, and Green Lantern is framed for murder.

The remaining heroes attempt to fight back, and the Universe ITSELF resurrects the Silver Age Flash, Barry Allen, to protect itself from Darkseid’s actions. On the brink of Darkseid’s final victory, Batman returns to mortally wound him, the Flash leads the Angel of Death, the Black Racer, to Darkseid, and finally Superman returns to destroy him…with a song.

Darkseid’s machinations, however, have weakened the multiverse to the point where a being known as the dark monitor, Mandrakk, attacks, attempting to destroy all reality. With the help of Nix Uotan, exiled Monitor living on Earth, an army of multiversal Supermen, the angelic hosts of Heaven, the Green Lantern Corps, and more, Mandrakk is destroyed, Earth is saved, and reality is once again normal.

The thing about Final Crisis is that it creates a sense of discombobulation — a very Romantic Literature notion of writing, where the work is actually affecting the reader on a fully engaged level — but it’s important that, to understand the story, we step back and stop getting lost in the fine details.

It’s one thing to be confused by the experience, but the story is right there on the page for all to see.

Jack Tango –

Great summary! Really, was that so difficult? I’ve decided to be done with rant about the relative artistic merits of the book, but I would like to pose a question for discussion.

Who do the Monitors represent? Who is it that has been corrupted by stories to the point they have begun to parasitically feed off them to the point of destroying them forever? Who has enforced strict boundaries to keep one type of story separate from other types of story?

I see in this FAQ both comic writers and editors mentioned, but the way I read it, I believe it’s us.

Comic book fans are the biggest threat to comic book stories. Resistant to change, always trying to bottle up our favorite stories and characters, violently angry when they don’t turn out the way we want. I’ve come to view Final Crisis as Grant Morrison’s warning to comic fans that we are stifling change in the story, thereby killing it.

But I could just be reading way too much into it.

Yeah. Never mind that some of the great classics of literature have entire semester-long courses devoted to dissecting, discussing, and explicating them. Clearly, a work of art that requires some thinking from the reader just sucks.

Don’t ever read a book.

Nothing is wrong with requiring some thinking to appreciate a book. But if you need to read annotations, interviews with Dan Didio and Grant Morrison, if you need earlier miniseries and tie-ins that you didn’t know were necessary in order to understand the basic plot, HOW EXACTLY IS IT A “THINKING” ISSUE AT PLAY? You mean if I think long and hard enough when reading Final Crisis #1-7, the events of Seven Soldiers will magically pop into my head? And all the annotations to old referenced comic books too? As well as the events of Batman RIP and the Final Crisis tie-ins? As well as the clarifications given by morrison and Didio in their interviews? A fan can “think” all day until the cows come home while reading Final Crisis #1-7, but all these extra info will not magically pop into his head. It’s an independent research issue at play, not a thinking issue. A fan needed to do a fair amount of independent research in the form of outside reading and annotation hunting and interview reading to appreciate and understand everything. A thinking problem would be if everything you needed to understand and appreciate what was happening in the book was right there in the pages of the book but one just still couldn’t get it.

Those semester-long courses are geared toward dissecting the symbolism, explaining the metaphors and cultural context and exploring the grand themes of the book. This on the other hand has a lot to do with just explaining what the hell the basic plot was and the order in which events happens…simple plot mechanics.

Those classics you mention? If you read the books, you can understand the book on a very basic level. Those courses are just meant to expand beyond that basic understanding of the plot mechanics, not to actually explain the basic plot mechanics themselves.

>>I see in this FAQ both comic writers and editors mentioned, but the way I read it, I believe it’s us.

It’s all of the above. Writers, editors, and readers. Morrison said it’s one story with all these other stories in it.

So many ways to sum up FC (no particular order):

-FC is the anti-COIE, Morrison’s revenge tale against COIE’s ending of the multiverse, explaining why the multiverse never should have ended and why it is here to stay (Infinite Crisis was the radion bullet against COIE, setting up FC for the final kill)
-Morrison’s repudiation of dark cynical Alan Moore/Alan Moore-like stories (Mary Marvel= Moore’s Kid Miracleman), and other dark cynical post-Crisis-type writers/editors, and readers who wanted dark cynical “realistic” stories and called for the end of the fun multiverse
-the power of comic stories, the power of the medium, what it can do that other mediums can’t
-Morrison’s repudiation of anal retentive fans and writers (complained about the confusing multiverse and always harping on continuity errors), whose anal retentiveness interfere with their ability to truly enjoy the comic book medium
-etc, etc

(I’m not saying I agree with what Morrison is getting at)

“Those classics you mention? If you read the books, you can understand the book on a very basic level.”

Really? Have you read Ulysses? Because I sure had trouble understanding it at any level at first. What about something like The Big Sleep? Chandler wasn’t even sure what happened. I can only imagine what you’d think of Un Chien Andalou.

You know what, fuck plot. Fuck plot and characters and settings. Fuck the literal, the thematic is what matters. “Every story must have a clear literal meaning.” Who made that rule? Why do we need that rule? Have we gone back to Aristotle? Poetics for Comics, the rules that every comic has to follow. Fuck rules.

To say that all comics, all art must have a clear literal seems a ridiculous rule. Welcome to surrealism folks, you’re only 70 years late.

“Comic book fans are the biggest threat to comic book stories. Resistant to change, always trying to bottle up our favorite stories and characters, violently angry when they don’t turn out the way we want. I’ve come to view Final Crisis as Grant Morrison’s warning to comic fans that we are stifling change in the story, thereby killing it.”

That’s pretty much the way I read it. Although I’d argue there is no need to pin it down to a particular group. It any reader, editor, writer, anybody who monitors comic continuity and ‘reality’ to the extent that they’d sacrifice story for it.

T. –

If you pick up any mainstream comic book, you need to have read something else to “fully” appreciate it. You don’t need to read Seven Soldiers to understand the plot of Final Crisis. All you need to read is Final Crisis 1 – 7, and Superman Beyond 1 & 2. I agree that Superman Beyond may have been better folded into a 9 or 10 issue Final Crisis, but that was DC’s decision, not the creator’s.

All you need to understand the story is to read the damn thing.

Maybe this is neither here nor there, but since Libra took half of each of the JL’s powers, would Libra not still have them? Also, has the JL been running on half power since that story, oh so long ago? Just confused.

Jack Tango – I appreciate where you’re coming from, but a detailed plot summary of FC #1-7 isn’t what I meant about understanding the story. Rather, one can read the seven issues and say what it’s about, but without the tie-ins and supplemental materials, the story has far less depth and is basically a montage of vignettes that lack, for me and presumably others, the context necessary to enjoy the story and making the whole thing feel fairly anticlimactic. The flip side of the discombobulation you describe is alienation, and, despite the occasional cool or neat bit, I found myself more often bored or irritated by the series because, while I could say what happened, I had a hard time articulating the who/why/how.

Brian’s great job on both the FAQ and the newer summary, I think, supports this sort of argument to a degree – after about the fourth issue or so, you’re left twisting in the wind without the supplementals. There’s still a plot there to follow, but you are acutely aware of things that are happening off-stage (Or out of issue) that are central to the story that you are not privy to until they are resolved in the book. If I were a stronger man I’d go back over the seven issues and map that out, but instead I would suggest just copying and pasting Brian’s summary into notepad and then deleting every line that refers back to a non-FC # 1 – 7 book.

Keep in mind that I’m not pushing any of the “You’re wrong and stupid!” “No, you’re stupid and wrong!” arguments being flinged over this, I’m just trying to get across how some folks who were left cold by FC aren’t necessarily numbskulled knuckle-draggers.

Brian, this is very informative, but also very difficult to read through. Could you possibly organize this like a traditional FAQ, into categories by topic with links to each section?

You should read the “Cliffs Notes” version, Matt!

It’s taken quite a few years, and quite a number of efforts, but Grant Morrison finally did the unthinkable (to me): I’ve been buying, reading, and collecting DC Comics since I was a five-year-old boy on Earth-Prime in 1967. I’m out. As of now. When publishers and editors label a comic book first issue or special event as a “Jumping On Point?” This was officially the jumping off point for me. I don’t have access or enough cash for whatever Mr. Morrison and his colleagues are imbibing that could make any of this make any sense. Thank you, Grant Morrison, for ruining comics for me. Enjoy the multiverse. I’m out!

[…] CRONIN ATTEMPTS FINAL CRISIS FAQ […]

Brian: You should definitely think about publishing a hardcopy book of annotations for FC when it is published as a TPB. This discussion here has been super-useful where Morrison’s own comments have been (unfortunately characteristically) snotty, self-righteous and smug.

I still really don’t like what Morrison did here, but at least you have cleared up a lot of the murk.

Thanks again.

“Thank you, Grant Morrison, for ruining comics for me. Enjoy the multiverse. I’m out!”

Ruining comics for you? That’s just sad.

Seriously, grow the hell up.

basically, If you’re well read can can deal with narrative ambiguity, then Final Crisis was a flawed but still excellently conceived story.

If not you don’t get it.

not everything has to be spoonfed to you.

Jim DeLorenzo

March 9, 2009 at 2:10 pm

I’m so thrilled I made any comment, to get the flaming I’ve since received. It justifies my decision further. For the record, I read comics to be entertained, by characters and stories that are enjoyable. I don’t need to turn to comic books for narrative ambiguity or to be spoonfed, either. Final Crisis is flawed and unintelligible. It’s storytelling by committee, just as bad as 52 and Countdown. Inconsistent, flawed, unsatisfying, and certainly not a bit uplifting. Again, I wish no one who liked it ill will — it’s just not for me. Have a good afternoon.

The first time I read FC, I hated it. There didn’t seem to be a coherent structure to the story. Now having read information like the above, I consider it a grand failure.

The main problems IMHO are as follows:

There is actually two different stories, Darkseid taking over the earth and the superman bleed/meta story arc. They had the same problem with the last crisis, where it mixed the Batman Brother Eye arc in with the Superboy prime/luther story arc.

Key scenes are not shown on camera or explained, such as Wonder Woman being transformed back or the rubic cube is actually a mother box (I think).

Killing Martian Manhunter in one side panel felt very weird. It should of been the climax of issue one or something.

Introduction of go now where side characters like the Japanese super hero team.

Unexplained side things happening that felt more like story notes then part of the main story. Such as Aquaman being reintroduced.

Way to much expectation for the reader to be a Rhodes scholar in DC lore. This would of been fine with more explanation. Morrision is good enough of a writer to introduce exposition information without bogging down the story.

The last issue being done in flash back. This really deflated any tension.

All together, FC felt like a collection of cool ideas and brain storming sessions with no coherence applied afterword.

Good to know. Excellent website especially on topics like bird control methods.

Wow, thanks to Brian and everyone else who contributed critically to this page. By that I mean criticism in the literary sense, not just simple dismissives. Good arguments to like and dislike Final Crisis. Personally I like Final Crisis, much as I like most of Morrison’s work. I think if you get it straight away then it hasn’t worked. I’ve lost count of the amount of times I’ve reread the Invisibles, Flex Mentallo and R.I.P. The thing that works for me about Final Crisis is that we really do come close to that whole idea of evil winning. There are points where I feel genuinely in the clutches of the Anti-Life Equation. Most agree that The Filth is Grant’s exploration of the dark side of the Kabbalistic Tree of Life, but I think Final Crisis is where he successfully evokes the Qlippothic.

It’s interesting that I stumbled on this FAQ in an attempt to clarify how Death of the New Gods ties in to Final Crisis. I kind of agree that on a superficial level it doesn’t or is tenuous at best. However on a more abstract conceptual level, as with all things godly there could be some link(s).

I’ve yet to read Seven Soldiers of Victory but that is definitely on my to do next list. Maybe then I can tie at least these three together.

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