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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 66

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

In honor of the opening of Watchmen at the end of the week, here’s a special “Watchmen moments” week!

Today’s the last bit, and I figure we might as well have the last major moment from the book.

Enjoy!

Okay, so Ozymandias’ plan has gone down, and the gathered heroes generally are willing to go along with his plan and keep everything quiet, as it seems a waste to ruin the peace his genocide has achieved.

All agree, but one, a fellow who has a problem with compromise…

It’s hard to pick the ONE moment from this…it’s either the “Never Compromise” bit or the “Do it!” (which retroactively inspired Nike’s famous sneaker slogan) bit.

Hmmm…I guess “Do it” has to be it.

25 Comments

Good thing the movie didn’t change Rorschach’s last line into “TRIGGER IT!”

But seriously, the scene was really well done in the movie. I knew what I was going to happen all along, but the scene triggered all the right emotions.

The ‘do it’ panel and its preceeding one where Rorschach takes off his mask left a lump in my throat. I hope the film gets that right if nothing else. Its arguably the most memorable moment in the whole story. Iys as if he recognizes Veidts new world has no place for him, and his removing his ‘true face’ is a symbolic act of suicide in the face of his actual death.

I thought the movie pulled Rorschach’s death off really well. Especially when the camera zoomed out, I got chills! And Nite-owls reaction.
Fantastic stuff.

In the last panel, is the blood making the same shape as the blood on the comedian’s badge?
Never noticed that before….
Awesome.

This is one of the nicemomentsof the book.

As for the movie, and it may be spoilery for those who have not seen it, if the death in itself was done okay in my opinion, having Nite-owl screaming that “Rorschach! Nooooooooooooooooo!” and beating Ozymandias because of that just after served only to cheaparized it, and turned something that is supposed to be intense into something cliché.

Personally, I always thought that “Joking, of course” was the best single moment in that sequence. We’ve got Jon being cold, Laurie and Dan being all angsty, but Rorschach is just…Rorschach. It fits perfectly with his character that not only does he make that decision, but he doesn’t even need to think about it. Not for one second.

Agreed with Brian Mac up there. “Joking, of course” is the best line in the scene.

If you look at the panel where Rorschach says “Joking, of course”, his mask has the same exact pattern as in issue 1, page 24, where he first says he won’t compromise “even in the face of armageddon”. So I guess that’s his “never compromise” face. There’s at least one other recurring mask pattern, Rorschach’s “shocked” face. You can see it in issue 1, when he finds The Comedian’s hidden costume, in issue 5, when he finds out Moloch is dead, and in issue 6, when he realizes what the two dogs are chewing.

Not to be too blasphemous, but I thought that the movie version of this scene was even more intense and well-done than the comic version, based largely on the excellent acting of Jackie Earle Haley. There were nuances to his expression and voice tone that gave me the impression that not only did he expect John to kill him, but that he almost wanted it – part of him knew it might be better for the world if the plot succeeded, but he couldn’t bring himself to compromise, leaving John’s actions to be the only way forward. It was not a nuance I had taken away from the comic version.

@DavidK: Haven’t seen the movie, but that’s the exact thing I got from the comic; that Rorschach didn’t want to be part of this world. He’d rather die than let what happened go unpunished. I’m not Watchmen’s biggest fan by a longshot but this is definitely my favorite scene in the book, because of that.

“having Nite-owl screaming that “Rorschach! Nooooooooooooooooo!” and beating Ozymandias because of that just after”

Ahaha, Jesus CHRIST.

Please tell me the first blow landed in that beating was in slow motion, that’s the only thing that would make the way I’m picturing this scene more perfect.

Like Nite Owl smashes Ozymandias’s nose in and immediately on impact the head starts to fly backwards in slow motion with a slight spinning motion on it so that the xbox-looking gouts of cg blood spraying from each of his nostrils form a perfect double-helix in midair that form Matthew Goode’s individual DNA sequence because this is the work of ZACK SNYDER, CINEMATIC VISIONARY.

I had hoped that sometime in the past week Brian would spotlight another moment earlier in issue 12: where Laurie shoots Adrian. While Adrian’s lying on the floor, Laurie notices (too late) that he’s holding the bullet in the palm of his hand. Adrian had caught the bullet, just as he had told Dan earlier that he could do. And his reaction after he knocks down Laurie and rises to his feet: ” There, Something else I wasn’t sure would work.”

The first thing he wasn’t sure about working was the plan to destroy Jon. Which, on the next page in very dramatic fashion, we find out didn’t. That scene of a very large Doc Manhattan crashing in on Adrian was pretty cool too.

Still, the moment Dan, Laurie and Jon realize the enormity of Adrian’s plan and their own failure to stop it….and Rorshach’s refusal to compromise, that trumps those scenes.

Night Owl beating Veidt wasn’t in slow motion. And the slow motion thing was much less distracting in the film than in the trailers, in fact the whole movie looked much better than what I was expecting from visionary director Zack Snyder. If there were some flaws in the movie, they were mostly in the script, not in the direction.

I thought Dan attacking Veidt actually worked, because it actually took me a moment to realize it wasn’t from the book. What sold it for me was Veidt’s refusal to fight back, which worked as a callback to Dan’s story about ‘Captain Carnage’.

it’s “joking, of course” thats my fav line

No, wait, seriously? Dan yells “No” and beats up on Adrian after this scene in the movie?

It’s possible that I just didn’t read the comments above closely enough and this is a joke, in which case I’m going to feel pretty silly in front of the whole internets, but if that really happens in the movie, it’s just the latest in a long list of things that make me glad I haven’t seen it, and doubtfully ever will.

It’s funny; two of the things I grew up loving both have high profile movies this year, and I don’t have the passion to see either one of them no matter how much they’re hyped. Maybe I’m finally outgrowing geekdom at long last. Geez, I’m depressed now.

Mike, the “NOOOOOOOO” scene is actually in the trailers. You don’t hear the audio, but it’s the one where Nite Owl is standing outside in the snow looking up to the sky and screaming as the bird’s eye view camera pulls back from him.

what a good way to end the week for that is the best moment of the entire saga. from the group being in a catch twenty two. to Adrian knowing he can go on doing the same thing. and Roarshach sticking to his guns even though it means he is destroyed to keep the truth .

I always liked how Kovacs ‘died’ as Rorschach and Rorschach died as Kovacs.

A question: Why does Rorschach want to die as Kovacs? His reasoning for donning the Rorschach mask in the first place is “to make a face that I could bear to look at in the mirror”, so why does he remove it at the point of dying? Is it because this cover-up by his “friends” kills the beliefs Rorschach lived by, so he may would rather die as Kovacs? Or does he just want Jon to see the face of the man he is about to kill instead of the faceless mask? Or is his intention simply to stare into “the face of Armageddon”? Or all of the above? Any theories?

I never noticed the red mist and the yellow circle forming the smiley…

Damn, I love Watchmen.

“No. Not even in the face of Armageddon. Never compromise.” – At the time, whebn I first read the book, I didn’t get this line, but years later I realized that it can be seen as a very pure distillation of Steve Ditko’s ultra-Objectivist protagonists. It sums up the philosophy, and Rorschach, perfectly.

Too bad you didn’t devote two days to Watchmen #12. Yes, everything from today was memorable. But what equally stood out in my mind was the final conversation between Ozymandias and Manhattan in that issue…

“I know people think me callous, but I’ve made myself feel every death. By day I imagine endless faces. By night…Well, I dream, about swimming towards a hideous…no. Never mind. It isn’t significant. What’s significant is that I know. I know I’ve struggled across the backs of murdered innocents to save humanity…but someone had to take the weight of that awful necessary crime.”

That’s when you finally realize that “Tales of the Black Freighter” is really Adrian’s story.

And then, after that, one of my favorite exchanges in the novel…

Veidt asks “Jon, wait, before you leave… I did the right thing, didn’t I? It all worked out in the end.” And Dr. Manhattan responds “In the end? Nothing ends, Adrian. Nothing ever ends.”

That summed up perfectly how temporary and transitory Adrain’s solution for world peace really was. He murdered millions to stave off a nuclear apocalypse, but for how long? Sooner or later, unless a real alien invasion really does come along, the unity created by Veidt’s hoax is going to collapse, as the petty jealousy and bigotry and political/religious factionalism of humanity gradually rear up once again. In the end, his utopia is transitory.

To really add to Rorschach’s “Joking, of course,” notice that in panels 4-8, his “expression” doesn’t change.

And I believe a lot of people keeping being confused about a very important fact: Rorschach took off his FACE, not his mask…

I think my favorite part of the scene is that the bloodstain left after Rorschach’s disintegration is a rotated version of the same stain left on the Comedian’s smiley badge, making yet another recurrence of that symbol during a key scene in the book.

ZACK SNYDER is extremely overrated. I’m not the biggest fan of Watchmen by any means as well, but the comic…er, sorry, graphic novel trumps the movie.

“A question: Why does Rorschach want to die as Kovacs? His reasoning for donning the Rorschach mask in the first place is “to make a face that I could bear to look at in the mirror”, so why does he remove it at the point of dying? Is it because this cover-up by his “friends” kills the beliefs Rorschach lived by, so he may would rather die as Kovacs? Or does he just want Jon to see the face of the man he is about to kill instead of the faceless mask? Or is his intention simply to stare into “the face of Armageddon”? Or all of the above? Any theories?”

For dramatic reasons more than anything else, I’m guessing. It looks so much cooler if he removes the mask, and asks Jon (with tears streaming down his face, natch) to “Do it!”, than it would have had he kept his mask on.

“That summed up perfectly how temporary and transitory Adrain’s solution for world peace really was. He murdered millions to stave off a nuclear apocalypse, but for how long? Sooner or later, unless a real alien invasion really does come along, the unity created by Veidt’s hoax is going to collapse, as the petty jealousy and bigotry and political/religious factionalism of humanity gradually rear up once again. In the end, his utopia is transitory.”

Yup. Eventually, things will end up that way, especially in the nasty, dark world of Watchmen.

“I never noticed the red mist and the yellow circle forming the smiley…”

“I think my favorite part of the scene is that the bloodstain left after Rorschach’s disintegration is a rotated version of the same stain left on the Comedian’s smiley badge, making yet another recurrence of that symbol during a key scene in the book.”

Ok, now people are just overdoing it…

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