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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 77

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we look at a mind-blowing scene from Jim Steranko’s Captain America “run.”

Enjoy!

In the context of the late 1960s as a whole, Jim Steranko’s work probably does not stand out that much. I mean, it stands out in the sense that it is very good, but I mean that it is not jarring to the senses.

However, in the context of the standard superhero comic book of the time, it really stood out quite a bit, particularly the following two pages from Captain America #111, the second issue in Steranko’s “run” on Captain America in issues #110, 111 and 113.

To set it up, Rick Jones was just beating himself up for not being good enough to be Cap’s partner, and particularly not being good enough to measure up to the original Bucky.

After Cap leaves, an envelope arrives for Cap. Rick figures he should open it, as he’s Cap’s partner. As it turns out, it is filled with a powerful hallucinogenic gas, designed to incapacitate Captain America.

Instead, it does the following to Rick (click to enlarge)…

The moment with the skulls would probably be “the” moment for me.

Trippy stuff.

23 Comments

How is that NOT mind-blowing for a 60s Marvel comic?

Agreed, that’s why I said that it was.

Has Rick met Winter Soldier/New Cap yet?

Holy Shit!

This was my first ever American Comic™!! My eight-year-old brain was so dazzled byt this page sequence… I just loved it!

I’ve been trying to discover which issue it was, but as it was a South African reprint, it was almost impossible…

NOW I CAN PAY A FORTUNE FOR IT ON EBAY!!

Thanks!

Tim, you should be able to find that issue cheaper in reprints (unless, of course, you want to own the actual issue, for sentimental reasons).

Has Rick met Winter Soldier/New Cap yet?

I don’t believe so, no.

that to me was one of the freakiest moments in comics for i thought someone was on something to let that issue be printed showing that

Was it in a recent Captain America issue that I saw that last page get homaged? I remember seeing a similar layout and knowing it must be an homage, but never knowing for what. What amazing artwork.

And this is why you don’t open other people’s mail.

Damn, that is awesome.

Hell, it’s still mind-blowing today!

Some serious Salvador Dali influence going on there.

Well, damn.

Yeah, I was thinking sentimental reasons…

Having looked at prices just for VG copies, I think I may look for a decent Essentials version instead…

At least I’ll get more for my money!

(Might put the issue on my Christmas/Birthday wsh list though…)

Thank you once more for making me feel young again!
:-D

About a year ago, Brubaker/Epting homaged this scene in an issue of Bucky-Cap, but even the eminent Steve Epting can’t duplicate the overwhelming trippyness of Steranko’s original. Awesome choice.

Possibly the first Captain America comic I ever read. Still one of the best!

Jim Steranko is a genius!

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

If you like that, will anything from “Whatever Happened to Scorpio?” make the list? What a great story that was.

The Scorpios stuff was amazing. Which comic was it that was sort of an homage to “Hound of the Baskervilles? Was it a Nick Fury story…titled something like “Full Moon Rise, Hell Hound Kill?

You got it pretty close to right, Iron Maiden.

“Dark Moon Rise, Hell Hound Kill” appeared in Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. #3 the August 1968 issue. “Whatever Happened” was in issue #5.

Jesus Christ, that is jaw-dropping!

I don’t know much (and don’t particularly care) about Captain America but that is amazin guse of the comic page in anybody’s language.

Hmmm… bit bemused by the reaction to this one. Are we applauding the images as they stand or their surprising use in a 60’s comic book? Because, (even though I generally like Steranko), that looks to me like a pretty by-the-numbers use of trippy imagery.

I’m not saying it’s bad, or that I don’t like it…. – I’m just saying I thought it was a fairly typical ‘hallucinogenic’ type image.

Interesting point, Cheeris.

If only someone had said:

In the context of the late 1960s as a whole, Jim Steranko’s work probably does not stand out that much. I mean, it stands out in the sense that it is very good, but I mean that it is not jarring to the senses.

However, in the context of the standard superhero comic book of the time, it really stood out quite a bit.

Yeah, of course I had read that and I knew where you stood on it.

My point was, despite that comment the trippy images above were posted out of context to apparently stand on their own merits. A lot of people seemed to like it A LOT, which puzzled me as I thought they are pretty generic.

Of course, not everybody might be familiar with this sort of thing. I could easily imagine that if it was seen for the first time it would be very striking. Going further, if was seen by the first time by (say) an eight-year-old living in the late 60s in the context of the comic books of those times, I could see it would be pretty mindblowing.

Pretty cool.

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