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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 100

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

For our one-hundredth cool comic book moment, I’m going to go to a classic comic by Steve Ditko and Stan Lee from 1962.

Enjoy!

In the first story of 1962’s Amazing Fantasy #15, we meet a teenager named Peter Parker.

Peter has a bit of a rough life (he gets picked on a lot for being such a nerd), but he is not too upset because he has a great Aunt and Uncle who raised him after his parents died.

Well, while at a science fair, he gets bitten by a radioactive spider.

This gives him the POWER of a spider!

After seeing a wrestling match, Peter decides to use his powers for personal gain.

He then decides to become a colorful wrestler…

Well, he gets a bit cocky, and when he has the chance to stop a burglar, well, he does not.

When he returns home, he learns that someone has murdered his beloved Uncle Ben!

For the first time, Peter decides to use his powers and costume to be a sort of vigilante to catch the murderer of his Uncle Ben!

Well, imagine his surprise when he learns that the murderer was the burglar that he let go!

So that leads to one of the most classic cool comic book moments in comic book history, the point where Spider-Man decides that he must use his powers for good, because, after all, with great power there must also come — great responsibility!

One hundred moments down, two hundred and sixty five more to go!

27 Comments

Aunt May looks a little heftier than usual in that frame. Must of lost weight after Ben died.

This issue was genius. My favorite moment was when Peter’s thinking to himself about how he can use his new powers, and has a line something like “I’ll make sure Uncle Ben and Aunt May are set up for life… everyone else can go screw off.” :)

Somehow, I knew this would be #100 before I read the article. Great choice.

John Byrne used to say that if he couldn’t do an Untold Tales of Spider-Man comic, because he viewed Stan and Steve’s Spidey as “Spider-BOY.” I say nuts to that idea; Peter Parker became a man (the hard way) in those last few panels.

BTW, I guess alternatively, Cool Moment #100 could have been from Amazing Spider-Man #100: Spidey grows four extra arms. I bet to the people who read that issue in the late 60s/early 70s, it was mind-blowing when it happened. How about making it Moment #101?

A well chosen moment, Brian.

Couldn’t get more classic than this.

But just curious, wasn’t this in 1962, not ’63? (that’s how I remember my parents’ wedding anniversary, frighteningly enough. I remember their birthdays via Batman’s in ’39. Comics are useful!).

Nice one! Even a couple of bald-headed scientists were keen to mock him. Poor guy couldn’t catch a break.

Huh! This is a good choice, if a little obscure. Whatever happened to this character, or the guys who created him for that matter? Sounds like material for a future “Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed”…

Great choice, Brian! The origin story from the single greatest creator run of the single greatest superhero in the history of mankind, bar none. Totally made my day.

John Byrne used to say that if he couldn’t do an Untold Tales of Spider-Man comic, because he viewed Stan and Steve’s Spidey as “Spider-BOY.” I say nuts to that idea; Peter Parker became a man (the hard way) in those last few panels.

Wow, Byrne truly did not get Spider-Man in the least, did he? Stan Lee choosing to call him Spider-Man and not Spider-Boy as well as make him a solo lead and not a sidekick or part of a kid team was very deliberate and what made him unique and unprecedented. He was a boy forced to become and act like a man. This is in fact one of the things I think Ultimate Spidey got wrong. He’s so scrawny and acts so immature it seems obvious to other characters that he’s a teenager. Lee and Ditko explicitly made it clear in their run that everyone Spider-Man encountered sincerely believed him to be an adult. In his personal life, in general society and his superhero life he’s catapulted into the role of an adult. With great power comes great responsibility….ADULT responsibility.

Good choice, but IMO the true “moment” was when he realized it was the burglar from earlier. Batman irrationally FEELS responsible for his parents death…Peter’s feelings are not so irrational. Not sure, but I think that’s a first.

“That–that FACE! It’s–oh no, it CAN’T be!”

Awesome.

It wouldn’t be too much of a stretch to finish out the rest of a “Year of Cool Comic Book Moments” by drawing entirely from Lee/Ditko Spider-Man, that’s how awesome it is.

Cass, you may be onto something. Not necessarily Spider-man specifically but a week or two dedicated to cool moments from original creators’ first runs on classic characters would be awesome. Siegal and Shuster’s Superman was throwing wife-beaters over tall buildings and making warring national leaders settle thier problems face-to-face. Marston’s Wonder Woman was chained up more times than Betty Paige ever thought of. You just don’t get that level of cool from the classic characters anymore.

How ’bout it, Cronin? Original creators week!

That is an awesome idea Bob. Seigel and Shuster’s original Superman run still is in my mind the character’s storytelling peak. I suppose with all of Bob Kane’s ghosts, original creator week might be a little harder for Batman though. :)

Random Stranger

April 10, 2009 at 8:51 pm

“Huh! This is a good choice, if a little obscure. Whatever happened to this character, or the guys who created him for that matter? Sounds like material for a future “Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed”…”

The writer eventually got out of comics and moved to California to become an actor where he only managed to get bit parts in movies like Mallrats.

The artist tried to branch out but only found use for his art as cutting boards.

Rather sad, really.

could not think of a better moment for one hundred classic Steve Ditko and
Stan Lee at the begining of the mu . perfect moment for one hundred

John Seavey: From what I understand, Stan Lee left comics to write novels under his actual last name Lieber. Steve Ditko became a money crazy shill with pretty much no standards. Spider-man just faded away into obscurity. Rather sad, these guys really had something going.

Too bad this version was the “corrected” version. The original printing, showing the pupils in Spider-Man’s eyes after he realizes what he had done, while an artistic mistake, just hamnmers home the shock that much more.

Ditko was such a master of comics that I am lucky to find more of his 50’s and 60’s work so that I can see just how amazing he was at storytelling.

Whenever I read Lee/Ditko Spider-man stories, I always hear Spider-man’s voice as the voice from the ’67 cartoon. It’s only Ditko’s Spider-man too. Go figure.

I think perhaps the coolest part of this entry was behind the scenes. Stan’s boss rejected the Spider-man concept, so Stan snuck it into the last issue of a canceled anthology. Brilliant.

Or is that one of those urban legends?

Too bad this version was the “corrected” version. The original printing, showing the pupils in Spider-Man’s eyes after he realizes what he had done, while an artistic mistake, just hamnmers home the shock that much more.

That’s not a mistake, it’s an intentional effect, and the moment loses a lot of power without it. Ever since I read this story in ORIGINS OF MARVEL COMICS, it’s never felt like the “real” moment to me without the pupils in Spidey’s mask.

Still one of the all-time great comic stories, though.

I agree with Cory and John T. In fact, I didn’t even know they’d whited-out Spidey’s little black pupils in current reprints of the origin, and was wondering what happened. It’s a great example of artistic license, like when, from time to time, the facial covering of Batman’s cowl moves to show his expression.

Was that the only time Spidey’s mask was depicted as a hood instead of a separate piece of his costume?

Casey, I think Spidey’s mask is just as magical as Batman’s cape ad cowl. Whether it’s attatched or a separate piece depends on the drama of the moment. Example: when Batman needs an impromptu diversion, the cape and cowl come off in one piece. Same when he just wants out of it quick in the cave. But when he wants to take a moment to brood on a rain soaked rooftop, the cowl comes off separate and he stands there holding it in his hand. Spidey’s mask is kinda similiar. Whichever is more convient for the scene.

[…] cool comic book moment #100, I went with a legendary moment that almost all of us know by heart, so for #200, I figured I would […]

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Great choice! We all know this story, but it’s still one of the coolest moments in comics.

@T

Spot on, there, mate.

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