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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 147

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

I know I said this would be a three-part look at Mark Waid’s Terminal Velocity storyline in Flash, but darnit, three parts is just not enough! So today is now part three of a FOUR part look at Terminal Velocity!

Enjoy!

Okay, so Flash #100 (by Mark Waid, with art by Salvador Larocca, Carlos Pacheco and Oscar Jimenez) begins with Kobra’s final plan (something about some device that causes an earthquake in Keystone City that will allow him to take over the world or some such result beginning.

Kobra has cut off Keystone from the rest of the world, and Waid and his artists show all the other heroes dealing with the forcefield and also the problems Kobra is starting all over the place (part of his plan is activating a number of sleeper agents).

It was notable because it was one of the few places where Batman’s “all black” costume actually looked pretty cool (I liked that look for Batman, but most artists didn’t exactly draw it too well)…

In any event, one of the coolest aspects of this story is how Kobra really hates LINDA PARK more than the Flash (or any of Flash’s crew). Kobra blames Linda’s investigative skills as the reason his plans almost were stopped, and he wants to kill her. That’s a nice twist – the love interest in danger, but NOT because of her connection with the star, but for her own actions. Linda, meanwhile, is hunting him down herself because she wants revenge (she’s quite tough in this issue).

But Linda is on her own – all the other heroes in Keystone are down for the count (Jay Garrick, Johnny and Jesse Quick and Impulse).

So things look bad.

That leads into the following moment…

What a great return.

The finale tomorrow!

26 Comments

KRAK-A-BOOM! That is one awesome sound effect.

Man, Wally’s really pissed off here! Of course, Kobra’s cliched response to Wally’s return is reason enough to take the cult freak’s head off.

wow, art by Salvador Larocca, Carlos Pacheco and Oscar Jimenez. A Spanish triumvirate.

Btw: I hated the black costume on Bats too, but I really miss his classic utility belt and the yellow oval on his chest. Those were the coolest aspects of the Bat-costume and they should be brought back someday.

@ Lt. Clutch – Don’t worry. They will be.

My youngest son loves WALL-E, and now that’s all I can hear looking at these pages…maybe that’s why Barry’s back.

This was a good run, though: I think I was liking the book until the John Fox business dragged on a bit.

Wow, is that art terrible! Look at Batman in that first panel! Ick!

Larocca sure got better later.

Ethan Shuster

May 28, 2009 at 6:20 am

We need a column dedicated to great sound effects words in comics! KRAK-A-BOOM, indeed. You could ask readers for some nominations…

KRAKABOOM… Awesome.

I remember this issue being climactic, super-hero fun, with the tension of the quesiton over our heads: is this mysterious white Flash really Wally? I mean, it’s gotta be…but is it?

I also remember that the story was interspersed with “here’s what the other super heroes are doing during Kobra’s attack,” a la the Batman scene. I was p.o.’d by the dialogue, though: everybody made a point of using each superhero’s name, as if we the reader didn’t know who they were.

“Wouldn’t you say so, BATMAN?”
“I hardly think they’ve come to rob a federal reserve bank, ROBIN!”

Oy. C’mon, if I’m reading a Flash comic, I probably know who Batman and Robin are.

Cool storyline in general, but I never to this day can understand what Kobra’s abilities are and how he manages to give so many top-tier guys so many problems. I mean who took out all those speedsters and it never even seemed he broke a sweat.

Wow, is that art terrible! Look at Batman in that first panel! Ick!

In a better world, Mike Wieringo drew every issue of the Mark Waid run on “Flash”.

Yeah, that first page with Batman made me cringe too.

Why did so many 90s artists think adding new muscles to a human body would make it look cool?

Personally, I liked the black costume as a compromise between the Dark Knight look (which is what we’ve been stuck with since NML) and the classic look.

As goofy as Battle for the Cowl was, it was nice to see the blue-and-yellow version of the costume busted out once more. It does a great job of “cutting” the grimness of Batman a bit. The only place I’ve ever really liked the modern version has been in the animated universe, which also has the practical reason of the oval being a lot harder to consistently animate than the “naked” bat.

Gee, I like the black-and-gray Batman costume. I’d expect hiding in the shadows is a lot easier when he can wrap himself in black instead of in the same blue that’s on Superman’s costume.
I always thought the biggest problem with the all-black suit was that hardly any colorists seemed to have gotten the memo about it being all-black–the trunks and the cape and the boots and gloves kept turning up with blue highlights.

Personally, I am a black and gray with yellow oval person. I know that it doesn’t “make sense in the real world”, but frankly I don’t care. I also think that you should be able to see the eyes on the Flash costume.

“I’d expect hiding in the shadows is a lot easier when he can wrap himself in black instead of in the same blue that’s on Superman’s costume.”

Well, to be fair, the fact that it’s the same blue is more a product of printing techniques than anything else. :)

In reality, though, I remember reading that a dark blue is actually more stealthy at night than pure black, since the latter is actually darker than anything else around it.

This was the debut of the “Speed Force,” right?

“This was the debut of the “Speed Force,” right?”

Pretty much. Waid had been hinting at something for a while (although some of that is misdirection, such as “Barry’s” dialogue upon his “return”), but this was the first time he out-and-out connected the dots.

I don’t know about any of you but I think it speaks to the brilliance of Mark Waid that he introduced the Speed Force in the mid-90′s and by the early 2000′s it had become a cemented part of Flash lore. It just seems to me like its always been a part of the mythos when really it’s not.

Yeah this art is a bit messy but I’ve seen a whole lot worse and after reading a few issues in a row, I found it easier to follow his style and didn’t mind so much.

yeah that 1st panel is pretty rough – very typical 90s stuff. But the others are very good. I think that was Jiminez. He was excellent and I could never figure why he didn’t work more. Too slow? Or did he get sick and die (I hope not, but I have a bad memory). Pacheco was a real find. He got better and better and I wasn’t surprised he became a big-leaguer; but I don’t think his current stuff is as dynamic as his older stuff. Avengers Forever (was that what it was called? the 12-parter he did with busiek?) was IMO his career best. Still, he’s a buy on sight for me. Jiminez would be too, but I never sight him. And Salva got much better, too, and fast.

that to me was the coolest moments and a omg of the whole story line for lLinda’s love is what acts as Wallies achot and the look of shock on korbra’s face was priceless

I don’t know about any of you but I think it speaks to the brilliance of Mark Waid that he introduced the Speed Force in the mid-90’s and by the early 2000’s it had become a cemented part of Flash lore. It just seems to me like its always been a part of the mythos when really it’s not.

I’m kind of torn on the Speed Force. I like it when its done well, but at times it seems to dominate the book and the stories since it’s been introduced. It’s almost become a character, and an overbearing one at that. I like it but don’t want it as prominent as it could get at times.

Flash 99 + 100 were imediately what i thought of when this whole ‘year of cool comic book moments’ was announced, glad to see they are getting the respect they deserve

i think that one of the coolest moments from this issue [and there are several], is the opening and ending. Linda is narrating, and she opens the book with something like, “My name is Linda Park, and I don’t belive in hope” [i know that i'm paraphasing, so if someone wants to actually get the quote, that would be awesome].
You can probablly guess that her narration changes somewhat by the end of the book. Again, a nice and simple, yet effective way of telling the story and getting the emotions through to the reader.
DFTBA.

Yes, that Bat even has extra muscles in his bird.

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