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Dwayne McDuffie Fired off Justice League of America an Injustice?

At the beginning of May, Rich Johnston compiled some of Dwyane McDuffie’s message board comments concerning his Justice League of America run and editorial interference. In his “20 Questions, 1 Answer” biweekly Q&A over at Newsarama, Dan DiDio was asked about the status of the title’s writer since Len Wein has been scheduled for various issues and answered: “As of right now, Len’s the writer of Justice League, and once his arc is done, we’ll be able to announce the new direction for the series.”

Dwayne McDuffie confirmed this on his message board, writing:

Nope, it was my own doing. I was fired when “Lying in the Gutters” ran a compilation of two years or so of my answers to fans’ questions on the DC Comics discussion boards. I’m told my removal had nothing to with either the quality of my work or the level of sales, rather with my revelation of behind-the-scenes creative discussions.

There’s a little bit more in that thread. I haven’t been reading the book after giving a few issues early on a look, but I’ve heard a lot of negative things about the writing — that seem to be explained by editorial dictating characters and story elements. My question: was McDuffie right to discuss those elements when asked given that he’s the writer and blamed for those faults and “clearing his name” makes sense, or is this sort of behaviour unprofessional? My take below.

I’ve always had certain issues with editors taking a heavy-hand in the creative process, often wondering that if they want to write the books, why don’t they simply do that instead of hiring someone and then leading them by the hand through every step of the process? They obviously hired Dwayne McDuffie to write the book for a reason — so why not let him write it?

I spent a bit of last week reading Christopher Priest’s accounts of working in the comics industry, which detail a lot of similar incidents of behind-the-scenes actions where books are sunk by (seeming) editorially mismanagement of various kinds (including Priest’s own actions at times). Mark Waid has discussed similar things, as has Chris Claremont and many others, so it’s not like these reports by McDuffie seem unbelivable.

However, I’m torn on what the proper course of action is for a creator to take when it’s his or her reputation that’s being damaged because of the actions of others. It’s easy for fans to say “Well, he should quit or shut up” since it’s not our job and paycheque on the line. There’s also the idea that while fans may blame McDuffie, comics insiders know what’s really going on, so McDuffie’s career won’t really be damaged, but accounts by creators don’t support that since it’s not uncommon for everyone involved in a book to blame someone else (ie. writers blame editors, editors blame writers), so who knows what the perception is of these events inside the industry…

Honestly, I want to side with McDuffie, but that’s because I’m not really sure what else he could do beyond quitting or shutting up, both of which either result in losing the paycheque (which he has) or allowing his reputation as a writer to be horribly damaged (which it hasn’t necessarily).

What do you think?

92 Comments

I figure, McDuffie’s been around. He knows how this works. In saying the stuff he said, he must have known that there was at least a _chance_ he’d be fired for it. So either he wanted to get fired or he didn’t care. Either way, he’s got a good enough resume that I don’t expect him to have any problems getting work. I’d hire him.

So, not an injustice, although regrettable for those people (possibly including McDuffie himself) who were looking forward to more JLA comics by him. (Len Wein makes a good consolation prize, but then it won’t make any difference if DC keeps stepping on Wein’s pizza the way they did with McDuffie.)

I thought McDuffie’s comments were remarkably respectful and professional for what they were—but being critical of management is always a touchy business. He had to know being fired was a possibility. It’s egg on the face of DC when the writer of their major team book says he’s not enjoying it, and not surprising at all that they would want to remove a guy who is publicly criticizing their operation.

But again, the complaints themselves were pretty tame compared to some other rants. And I’ll be sorry to see him go.

Alternatively, a public grievance could have the editorial mandates back-off, giving the writer room to breathe. The first interview for his upcoming JLA stint had both McDuffie and DiDio so excited that his term was cited as ‘indefinitely’. Now imagine if McDuffie was to write JLA forever under his current circumstances.

Seems like a dream job he couldn’t quit, but a miserable job he couldn’t keep. He did what he could, came out as best as he could.

If he disliked writing it so much, I don’t think he’d really mind being removed from the book. He wasn’t allowed to tell the stories he wanted to tell– that’s hideously frustrating for a writer.

Quite possibly. I do think the idea that he raised these issues may have been attempt to use public opinion to get editorial to change tactics — sort of a “Well, if I’m not enjoying this, what do I have to lose?” approach.

Things like full-on trade secrets and the type of information that would give a competitor an unfair advantage are the only area in which an employer should have authority over what an employee says. Otherwise, we need laws in place cutting back on the power to police employee blogs and other channels of public complaint about treatment and management behaviour, as well as ones drastically limiting the scope and power of NDAs.

As I understand it, it seems to me Mr. McDuffie has a legitimate grievance. It stands to reason that DC never told him he could not comment or answer fan questions — if anything, I suspect he was encouraged to work the convention circuit and talk to the fan press, promotion’s part of the job. Moreover, it apparently became an issue not after he actually answered the questions, but after Rich Johnston compiled them.

All that being said, Dwayne McDuffie is a guy that has pretty impeccable credentials. I doubt this incident has put him in any kind of position where he can’t get as much work as he wants. I daresay he’ll probably be happier working on something where he’s not constantly having his stories screwed up. The whole thing looks like a replay of the Chuck Dixon mess from where I’m sitting… which would make the real PR loser in this case DC editorial. Again. Second verse, same as the first.

I don’t think McDuffie did anything wrong, but I’m not at all surprised they handed him his walking papers. Few people like having their incompetence exposed, even inadvertently.

The very-top, down editorial hand controlling everything is also what Chuck Dixon has said is the current status at DC is.

Whoops, just read Greg’s comment and see he pointed out the same thing. I’ll say it again.

Well this is a kick in the head. Even with all of the tie-ins and editorial interference, I’ve been enjoying Justice League and was looking forward to seeing what McDuffie was going to do with the team now that Batman, Flash, Wonder Woman, and Superman were gone (the adventures of Firestorm, Vixen, Green Lantern, and Zatanna, and all that).

Man. DC editorial is a mess. What’s the point of putting guys like Dwayne McDuffie, Sean McKeever, and Chuck Dixon on their books if they’re going to screw with their writing and take them off their books anyway.

Have a good day.
John Cage

“I’ve always had certain issues with editors taking a heavy-hand in the creative process, often wondering that if they want to write the books, why don’t they simply do that instead of hiring someone and then leading them by the hand through every step of the process? They obviously hired Dwayne McDuffie to write the book for a reason — so why not let him write it?”

But some of the issues McDuffie came up against were to do with what was happening in other books. Wether McDuffie or the other person, SOMEBODY has to be affected by editorial.

McDuffie has always come across as a consument (sp) professional. So there’s that. On the other hand, while he may not have been specifically instructed to not complain about his job in a publically accesible forum, I would assume that it’s just understood that you don’t do that while you’re on a project. (See “don’t s*** where you eat”).

I can’t imagine that kind of behavior at any workplace, certainly no place I’ve ever worked would tolerate me saying that the emperor has no clothes from a soapbox in the town square, regardless of how right I may be. See, the difference between this and what Priest, Waid, et al went through is that they all vented their gripes after parting ways with their projects.

It’s kinda like that girl who got fired from a fast food restaurant because she posted a video on YouTube of stuff the employees were doing in the kitchen. That girl could have posted a video of a rat investation in the restaurant, and she would have still been fired.

The thing that surprises me, however, is that McDuffie had to know all this. Maybe he wanted to get pulled from the project. Maybe this was all in his master plan.

So, my take in a nutshell is that it is unfortunate, but expected.

The really sad thing will be if, when they announce the new team in a few months, they take the book in a “bold new direction” that would have freed McDuffie from some of the editorial dictates he complained about, or in a few years they follow a path similar to the one McDuffie wanted to take the characters but couldn’t because of outside pressures.

“He wasn’t allowed to tell the stories he wanted to tell– that’s hideously frustrating for a writer.”

Probably true, but when you are working on a corporate-owned book, you have to leave room in your planning for editorial dictates.

What’s the point of ever putting Chuck Dixon on a book for anybody? He hasn’t written an interesting comic in 20 years.

Otherwise, we need laws in place cutting back on the power to police employee blogs and other channels of public complaint about treatment and management behaviour, as well as ones drastically limiting the scope and power of NDAs.

Anything you put on the internet is public information, oftentimes even if it is password protected.

If I post on my blog “My boss is a jerk,” he can access it just as much as you can. In a sense it’s really no different then me posting a note saying “My boss is a jerk” in the coffee room — it’s public information — in fact, one could argue that the internet is even worse because ANYONE with an online connection can access my blog, and not everyone can access the coffee room. If you make PUBLIC inappropriate comments about your boss or your job and it, in turn, detracts from your ability to do your job, you can be fired. Freedom of Speech is a wonderful thing, but people need to realize that words, like actions, can have consequences — not to get too political, but making a law that “protects” people from the consequences of their own words is a pretty scary thing if you think about how it could completely destroy the morale and productivity of a workplace. Heck, you’d probably have an entire office posting disparaging stuff about the company and each other and that definitely isn’t a good thing.

McDuffie obviously had a problem with how he was being treated and went public with his comments. Did it hurt DC as a company? Well, certainly a lot of people online have made negative comments about DC editorial since McDuffie went public, so it DEFINITELY hurt the company’s image (although I’d argue the damage has already been done). If you hurt your company’s image, expect your walking papers.

WITH THAT SAID… I don’t work for DC, so I don’t know if McDuffie made his feelings clear to editorial. However, if he did not that gives him an even bigger reason to be removed — after all, that’s even more unprofessional.

Just as an example to add to my comments above — I used to work in a job where the public image of the company and the employees was EXTREMELY important. An employee was asked to resign for posting various blog posts which strong criticized her bosses and fellow employees, which EVERYONE in the company had access to since it was public. The resulting drama made many people refuse to work with her, and office morale plummeted.

It was at that time I figured I’d best get out of the corporate world.

I’ll miss McDuffie. I’ve been waiting to see what Dwayne would write, hoping that he would be ‘free’ do tell the stories he wanted. Conway added his own creation Firestorm to the JLA team. Every writer since has done the same, adding their own characters (Morrison = Aztek & Zauriel). Or their own line -up. How else does Roy Harper get in the JLA while Oliver Queen is alive (Meltzer)?

To me, the sad thing is now McDuffie does not get to sheppard his own creations from the Milestone universe in the JLA title.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

May 28, 2009 at 8:03 pm


But some of the issues McDuffie came up against were to do with what was happening in other books. Wether McDuffie or the other person, SOMEBODY has to be affected by editorial.

Other books is the keyword here – did they HAVE to take the characters he wanted to use out of the only book they were in to put them in another?
If you want to do a crossover event, put everything into play in the first issue of that event – if it isn’t organic, it’s not going to seem more organic by screwing up another book just so that awkward shuffling doesn’t mar the crossover event.

It’s like an odd crossover Wildstorm once had – it took place when Moore was writing Wildcats.
It seemed to massively change the characters in his book, Wildcats, and yet he had no interest in following those changes (the android was now a different personality who used to be a lover of a different character, which made her ex who wanted her back out of place….) – he mentions the changes, but doesn’t do anything with them.
What was the point of doing them if all it did was get in the way of the writer who actually wrote those characters?

“Anything you put on the internet is public information, oftentimes even if it is password protected.”

You’re not telling me anything I don’t already know, McK. I’m not ignorant of what can happen when you do this and why; I’m just advocating legal constraints on a company’s ability to crack down on such things. Disagree with that notion as much as you like, but don’t think that I’m under the delusion that it’s a right that people already have.
Plus, note that I talked about “cutting back on the power to police employee blogs and other channels of public complaint” not totally eliminating it or granting a blanket licence to go nuts with libellous falsehoods or the like (though I do believe that individuals should have stronger protection against such things than corporations). I just think that employer’s ability to crack down is far more absolute than it should be.
(I will freely admit, though, to feeling that any workplace that inspires enough complaints from enough disparate individuals might not actually deserve to have its morale and productivity protected.)

I think Dwayne had to step forward because he was being lambasted for his erratic run on JLA. And I think he was very professional to point out what was going on, what was his responsibility and what was DC Editorial responsibility. I can’t recall any of his messages even saying DC was doing something wrong: rather, he was being pushed to re-write and re-write and re-write.
Curiously, this was ALSO the case for Jim Shooter and his great little run at Legion of Super-Heroes. And probably why Keith Giffen could not publish Ambush Bug #6 so far. And Sean McKeever was fired from Teen Titans and Titans. And Mark Waid being practically forbidden to write for DC. And so it goes.
To be fair, there are only two writers these days that can write whatever they want (and in the process screw everyone up inadvertently): Geoff Johns and Grant Morrison.

I’m just advocating legal constraints on a company’s ability to crack down on such things. Disagree with that notion as much as you like, but don’t think that I’m under the delusion that it’s a right that people already have. Plus, note that I talked about “cutting back on the power to police employee blogs and other channels of public complaint” not totally eliminating it or granting a blanket licence to go nuts with libellous falsehoods or the like (though I do believe that individuals should have stronger protection against such things than corporations).

Fair enough, but I see it more as a personal responsibility issue — a “don’t write a check that your a$$” can’t cash sort of a thing, and people should be held accountable for their own actions. McDuffie wasn’t exactly filing official complaints, and one thing I should point out is that McDuffie made these comments not on his own personal blog, but the DC Message Boards. So he was using company property to make not-so-positive remarks about the company, which to me renders him totally in the wrong. I don’t go over my neighbor’s house and tell him the color he painted his house sucks and expect him to take it as polite constructive criticism.

(I will freely admit, though, to feeling that any workplace that inspires enough complaints from enough disparate individuals might not actually deserve to have its morale and productivity protected.)

Can’t disagree with you here. Yet I’ve worked in enough places where petty individuals and BS arguments between employees take up far too much time that could be used usefully, so I understand why some companies work so hard to try to improve morale. Which is why I don’t work in those types of places anymore.

I disagree with you, Jack. Unless you’re a government employee, a company is a private entity. Whether it’s privately owned or a corporation. While you have every right (in America at least) to say what you want about the company in public or on a blog or whatever, they have every right to fire you for it. Theoretically, companies can fire work-for-hire employees for any reason, or none at all. Granted, that’s not totally the case any more with wrongful termination suits and all that. But if a company wants to fire someone for what they post online, that’s the company’s right to do so. Might not be a good idea, but that’s beside the point. If I was sitting in a bar, loudly telling stories about what an asshole the owner of my company was, then discovered that he was sitting at the other end of the bar and heard everything I said, I would pretty much expect to be fired. Posting on a blog is no different.

Curiously, this was ALSO the case for Jim Shooter and his great little run at Legion of Super-Heroes. And probably why Keith Giffen could not publish Ambush Bug #6 so far. And Sean McKeever was fired from Teen Titans and Titans. And Mark Waid being practically forbidden to write for DC. And so it goes.

Yet all of the above (I’ll add Dixon to the list) had not gone so publicly with their comments until AFTER they stopped working on their books for DC (Giffen and McKeever I believe are still working there in some form, and have kept their mouths shut as far as I know). Waid’s just got a Batman mini coming out, and I believe that’s all, so he can speak freely too.

McDuffie is the only one who came out publicly during his tenure, hence the removal from JLA. I give him points for standing up for himself, but what happened to him shouldn’t be a shock considering the obvious editorial issues at DC. But if he didn’t like writing for the title, well, maybe it’s a good thing he’s not writing it anymore.

FUN FACT: All of the above are writers… now must be a great time to be an artist at DC!

McK

Actually, Jim Shooter DID speak up before he was fired. He said he had to change things and shorten his run due to editorial mandates.
And you are right: they gave Scott Kolins and Tony Daniel writing assignments. I bet Titans will be written by Ed Benes (in Portuguese) at some point.

Geez, every writer I like at DC keeps getting run off by editorial. Timm and Rucka had better watch their steps.

I don’t think McDuffie did anything wrong, but I’m not at all surprised they handed him his walking papers. Few people like having their incompetence exposed, even inadvertently.

But that’s still not fair of Didio, because he ruined his own reputation long before this with all his debacles. Infiite Crisis art debacles, tacky body counts, Countdown to Final Crisis, Death of the New Gods debacle, All Star Batman, Batman RIP having to be continued in Final Crisis, mixed reactions to FInal Crisis, messing up Shooter’s Legion run, messing up Chuck Dixon’s return to the Bat-universe….no one but the most extreme Didio apologist still thinks Didio is anything but incompetent. So why fire McDuffie for revealing what most thinking fans already knew? That any problems with the book were Didio’s fault? Whenever I see normally good writers produce crap at DC, my first assumption is always that Didio’s at fault.

It shocks me that Dido really believes he has a reputation left to protect.

I think it’s pretty petty of DC to fire him for that. It’s like they kicked him out of the house because he told people they weren’t doing their chores.

To me, the sad thing is now McDuffie does not get to sheppard his own creations from the Milestone universe in the JLA title.

But on the bright side, with McDuffie gone Didio can feel free to give them the proper new-DC treatment and properly have them raped, disfigured, maimed, or their family members killed or molested to give them “proper motivation.” Speaking of which, isn’t there currently some revelation going on with Barry Allen currently showing some previously unrevealed family trauma?

As the son and grandson of small business owners, one who has spent most of his life listening to them talk about how to run a business, I can tell you for certain that if anyone publicly put out something like McDuffie did while still under their employ, they’d be fired so quickly it isn’t even funny. It’s just not particularly professional to publicly complain about your employer. And yes, I think that it is reasonable that it happened after it got posted by LITG and not when they were originally posted. The reason is simple: A much, much, larger number of people read LITG as opposed to the message boards. You can overlook something if very few people notice, but it’s a lot harder to ignore something that a large number of consumers read.

There are a couple of things going on here.

One is McDuffie essentially being canned for going public with his problems with the editorial mandates he was having to work under. (I think it’s a distinction without a difference that he’d posted them as answers elsewhere and then got popped when someone compiled them; seeing them all in one place may have been the realization moment for DC editorial that McDuffie was ripping them a lot in public) They have the right to do it, but generally their tolerance of it is directly proportional to how much that writer is worth in sales to them. Maybe to them McDuffie isn’t worth it (or maybe he was a bigger pain in the ass behind the scenes than anyone knows).

There’s also the question of whether it’s professional to take these grievances public. I’m reminded of when Colleen Doran trashed the ink job done on an issue of Sandman she’d done. On the one hand, maybe she needed to speak out to defend her work. on the other hand, maybe you should keep stuff like that in house. It’s a hard line to know for sure between defending your own reputation and throwing someone else under the bus.

Here’s the other thing this makes me think of: DC is getting trashed hard here for heavy-handed top-down editorial direction. But one of the things that’s been most missing from the big two (and comics in general) in recent years has been real editorial control. We want better editors demanding quality storytelling and making people re-write the lazy crap and re-draw the crap. We want editors putting the hammer on creators for being late and maintaining schedules. DC editors seem to be taking back some control…but people seem unhappy about it. Is it because they suspect it’s all coming from Didio (who gets hated on), because they don’t like the results, or because they haven’t used the power correctly yet?

FunkyGreenJerusalem

May 28, 2009 at 9:42 pm

To be fair, there are only two writers these days that can write whatever they want (and in the process screw everyone up inadvertently): Geoff Johns and Grant Morrison.

I don’t blame them for that though – editorial could always so ‘no’ to something.

Or in the case of Countdown – not base a fifty two issue series on a script and then not let anyone else see it…

Coralskipper…all he did was say which story decisions came from editorial. He didn’t badmouth them or anything if you read the original comments in question. People asked why did you do x,y and z? And he said editorial asked for x, then y and z. I wanted to do a, b and c, but those got derailed.” That’s not really badmouthing. I mean unless Didio realizes his decisions are bad and thinks being associated with his own choices is damaging. If the guy made the decisions and he thinks they were good ones why doesn’t he just stand by them?

“FUN FACT: All of the above are writers… now must be a great time to be an artist at DC!”

Because no one is at fault when Ed Benes includes Superman on the cover of JLA#33 even though he’s on New Krypton rather than anything to do with this story. [No shots; I like Ed Benes, just saying…]

So if DC is pushing their ‘Nation’, ‘Source’ and Twitter informational stuff, talking about how open they are with the fans. And then fire a writer for being open with the fans……doesn’t that smack of hypocrisy?

And it is a shame because 33 went a long way into putting the last 6 or 7 mis-mosh into some sort of sense…

I’d love for McDuffie to come back to Marvel and handle a New Warriors or Young Avengers title…

FUN FACT: All of the above are writers… now must be a great time to be an artist at DC!

I doubt it. When Frank Cho re-uped his exclusive at Marvel the reason he sighted was freedom from excessive editorial interference. The stream of reliable, professional artists (Tom Grumett, Stuart Immoden, Barry Kitson and etc.) out of DC during the DiDio years matches the list of writers.

Something tells DC is, like, the third choice for anyone who isn’t working with either Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison or maybe Darwyn Cooke.

Duffie wasn’t exactly filing official complaints, and one thing I should point out is that McDuffie made these comments not on his own personal blog, but the DC Message Boards. So he was using company property to make not-so-positive remarks about the company, which to me renders him totally in the wrong.

Ordinarily, I would totally agree with you. However, there is clearly something very wrong at DC Comics. It is a like “The Caine Mutiny”. The individual actions by the freelancers are wrong, but there are is so much smoke that it is hard to believe there isn’t a fire somewhere.

Huh….

I guess the Internet is for baseless speculation, so I will just note that Dan DiDio no longer has his name on the DC Comics masthead:
http://www.dccomics.com/dccomics/about/?action=masthead

I’m convinced Didio must have the most comprehensive set of blackmail pictures of Time Warner execs ever because I can’t see otherwise how he’s still there.

If you make PUBLIC inappropriate comments about your boss or your job and it, in turn, detracts from your ability to do your job, you can be fired.

Did any of you guys actually read the LITG that Chad linked to?

First, Rich compiled those quotes from DC’s own message boards. So it was okay at one point for McDuffie to say that on the company’s own site. It wasn’t until Rich gave it a higher profile HERE that suddenly it became objectionable.

Second, if any of you actually look at what he said, he did not badmouth anyone, he named no names, he shrugged it off as the kind of policy decision you have to live with on a high-profile corporate book… in other words, McDuffie himself was making all the points that commenters here are saying “he should have known.” He did know them. He mentioned those things in his (courteous, professional) answers to fan questions on the company’s own message boards.

No, his great crime was accidentally telling enough of the truth that it was easy for LITG readers to see what a directionless train wreck that DC editorial policy has become. And now DC’s embarrassed. They can’t punish Rich Johnston for embarrassing them, so they punish McDuffie for providing Rich the raw material.

It’s juvenile and ridiculous and will probably result in DC publishing worse comics. In short, for those of us that follow this sort of thing — same old same old.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

May 28, 2009 at 11:12 pm

No, his great crime was accidentally telling enough of the truth that it was easy for LITG readers to see what a directionless train wreck that DC editorial policy has become. And now DC’s embarrassed. They can’t punish Rich Johnston for embarrassing them, so they punish McDuffie for providing Rich the raw material.

Which is weird – are they wrist slapping him and making an example… OR, is their attempt to put out the fire – McDuffie is gone so we’ll all think that the stories suffering from editorial interference are gone?
I get trying to shift perception, but that’s just pathetic if that’s the aim.

“I think Dwayne had to step forward because he was being lambasted for his erratic run on JLA.”

I don’t like to side with DC, but, if somebody came to me and complained about something the company had done, and I responded by explaining how much of an idiot the Senior Vice President of Marketing was for coming up with it, and gave a detailed public list of all the wrong decisions he had made, I’d be fired. That’s really just common sense.

Does DC have the right to fire McDuffie on a whim? Yes, as long as there’s not a contract that says otherwise.

Was it a GOOD idea? NO. They ended up losing twice- they lost a great writer AND they ended looking bad in public- again.

Are they wrist slapping him and making an example… OR, is their attempt to put out the fire – McDuffie is gone so we’ll all think that the stories suffering from editorial interference are gone?

Those options both strike me as having too much thought put into them. Anyone thinking things through to that extent should also theoretically be capable of saying, “Okay, that stung, but this guy has done more for our JLA brand than any other talent in the last few years except maybe Bruce Timm, he can sell us some books.” In other words, someone thoughtfully trying to analyze it from a business standpoint doesn’t jump right to the nuclear option.

If I had to put money on it? I’d bet on a third choice — sheer immature lashing out. I dount there was any analysis put into it much beyond, “Oh yeah? Well now you’re fired! How do you like that mister smarty?”

FunkyGreenJerusalem

May 28, 2009 at 11:36 pm

I don’t like to side with DC, but, if somebody came to me and complained about something the company had done, and I responded by explaining how much of an idiot the Senior Vice President of Marketing was for coming up with it, and gave a detailed public list of all the wrong decisions he had made, I’d be fired. That’s really just common sense.

Bu he didn’t – he over two years – just explained what happened with story lines he’d started but didn’t finish, odd character bits and stories that didn’t make much sense.
Comments such as ‘It wasn’t the team I’d have picked but you work with what’s available’ or ‘I had to change that story because Character X was needed in another book’ is not calling anyone an idiot.

I dount there was any analysis put into it much beyond, “Oh yeah? Well now you’re fired! How do you like that mister smarty?”

Which is bizarre when he’s response could easily be ‘That’s fine, it gives me more time to work on those jobs which pay more and give me more exposure, working on products that reach more people and make more money than this one does’.

I’m with Hatcher, here.

If what Dwayne said was wrong, he should’ve been corrected, or told so, or fired, when he said it!
…And not 6 a few months after the fact!

Let’s face it, DC is crying foul 6 or 7 months after the game’s been over!

And another thing…

It’s funny how everybody loves Freedom of Speech; that is… just as long as nobody says something that you don’t want to hear!

FunkyGreenJerusalem

May 28, 2009 at 11:54 pm

It’s funny how everybody loves Freedom of Speech; that is… just as long as nobody says something that you don’t want to hear!

Freedom of speech is a government/legal concern, not a private one.

Freedom of speech is a government/legal concern, not a private one.

I was just expressing a general sentiment of mine; not a legal one.

I’m not a lawyer so my recollection of business & labor laws is not the best. I think that, and this depends on the language in your contract, most companies (if requested) have to provide a reason for your dismissal (I think!?!?). To be honest, I’m not too sure what an employee’s rights are; they may vary from business to business. But getting fired for something that happened 6 or 8 months ago, where the company had plenty of time to notify or correct the employee’s behavior, may not qualify as just cause.

Then again, maybe a Freelance Writer may just not have the same rights as a staff employee.

But if I remember Valerie D’Orazio’s case correctly; staff personnel may not have any rights either.

But that doesn’t sound right.

I think that “the powers that be” at DC are the biggest douche bags in the world and just don’t care; but I know for a fact that they couldn’t fire me for talking in Spanish to someone (even if it’s in their offices) or insult me just because they are the boss and I’m a peon. It could be because of freedom of speech laws, or harassment laws. I don’t know. All I know is that if you can get 12 Jurors (and in some cases a Judge) to agree that the sky is red and with white stripes; then by all means, that’s how it is.

As the son and grandson of small business owners, one who has spent most of his life listening to them talk about how to run a business, I can tell you for certain that if anyone publicly put out something like McDuffie did while still under their employ, they’d be fired so quickly it isn’t even funny. It’s just not particularly professional to publicly complain about your employer.
People keep saying this and it irks me because he doesn’t complain. In fact, in the posts that he got fired for, he actually goes out of his way to defend DC editorial.

As far as I can see, all he did was set the record straight when falsely accused of unprofessional standards. Then be fired and get accused of unprofessional standards for doing so.

Yeah, sure sounds like a poor decision by DC to me, as well.

Of course you side with McDuffie. The choice is the guy who gave us the Justice League cartoon or the guy who thought it’d be funny to have Sue Dibny raped and murdered.

Oh, and I doubt that the real reason is McDuffie talked. That’s just a convenient excuse (and perhaps a warning to others in the stable). Axeing him for “talking” is marginally better PR than kicking him off the book so Geoff Johns can take over.

(Of course, Didio started in animation…and McDuffie is like a thousand times more successful in that field than Didio was, so who knows, could just come down to jealousy).

Did any of you guys actually read the LITG that Chad linked to?

A game of “Chinese Whispers” is a wonderful thing…

I’m sad to say that i’m happy that he got taken off the book. McDuffie needs to be on a book where he actually has room to spread his wings. I know people HATED Meltzer’s short run, but he got more ability to write a story he wanted to. I’d rather take Meltzer than the mess that plagued Dwane McDuffie’s run. I’m only 27, so this is the least relevant run I have ever read of JLA

I have a new mantra. It goes like this:

“Forget it, Jake. It’s DC Comics.”

DC has been screwing over talent since the Major was running things. It’s always been a petty and pompous company. But the fans – for the most part – don’t care about anything but the comics, no matter how much they claim to hate them – and the talent knows DC’s checks won’t bounce.

Dwayne is one of the very best writers in comics. It’s DC’s loss.

On the other hand, maybe DC figures that, now that they worked out an arrangement to allow them the use the Milestone characters in their DCU books, they didn’t need Dwayne any longer.

Honestly, every time I try to give DC the benefit of the doubt on any issue – be it creator treatment, racism, sexism, etc. – I end up disappointed. I believe I am destined to always be disappointed by DC Comics.

Forget it, Jake. It’s DC Comics.

Tony Isabella

As Greg said, just gave the facts of what happened behind the scenes and often said that he didn’t blame anyone. He didn’t say “My employer sucks”. He said “My employer had me rewrite what Roy said about Hawkgirl because they decided to resurrect her after all”.

I would also note that DC editorial is happy to suck it up when Grant Morrison *complains* in actual *news articles* about the mess of Countdown and Death of the New Gods not properly leading into Final Crisis, but a guy answering questions, without rancor, about why he’s had to rewrite his work…that’s apparently actionable.

Actually, I do see similarites with the corporate world, but not quite how most are seeing it here.

He hasn’t been fired from DC. He’s been fired from the Justice League. Apparently his other projects are still going.

I see this more as working on a project in a company. If the manager gives directions you can’t work with, and then you go public with how you just can’t work with that manager and the demands he’s giving…and the customers are seeing a lack of quality in the end results…

It makes sense to pull you from the project and find someone that CAN work with the directions of the manager.

What you’ve demonstrated by going public and pointing out the problems is that you can’t work WITHIN the group and solve the issues. You’re basically signaling that you can’t work as part of the group.

That doesn’t reflect on your skills. It doesn’t reflect on what you’re capable of doing. It’s essentially a matter of ‘The manager isn’t going anywhere. You can’t work with the manager. There are others that can do the job and work with the manager. QED, we’ll have to let you go from here and bring someone in who can do that.”

That person may not be as talented as you. You may be head and shoulders above them in general. But if you can’t use your talents and fit into the directions given…then it’s understandable.

Don’t get me wrong–I generally love McDuffie’s work. He’s a name I’ll go out of my way to buy books for. I’m not questioning his talent.

He deserved to lose that gig. It isn’t that he shouldn’t “lift the curtain”, it is that he basically told people that the book was going to suck.

Those are books that DC is trying to sell.

Yeahm you caught that before I thought about the title of this article. I hope this gives McDuffie room for something cool. I hope JLA can rise in relevance as well with another writer.

Only DC book I read is Jonah Hex. Haven’t read Justice League in years. I just assume they save the world every month.

He deserved to lose that gig. It isn’t that he shouldn’t “lift the curtain”, it is that he basically told people that the book was going to suck.

No he didn’t. He simply told the fans what he wanted to right and what editorial told him to change. He didn’t tell them that it did or was going to suck. The fans themselves decided it was already sucking and would continue to do so. But they would have come to that conclusion on their own.

And as Graeme points out, Morrison has come out in major interviews doing the same thing in much harsher terms and is still around.

I’d rather take Meltzer than the mess that plagued Dwane McDuffie’s run. I’m only 27, so this is the least relevant run I have ever read of JLA

Ok, just because McDuffie was plagued by editorial interference and couldn’t write the books he wanted to write, let’s not get crazy and claim that Meltzer’s work was anything more than atrociously mediocre. McDuffie at his most hamstrung was still better than Meltzer at his best. Meltzer is one of the worst working writers I’ve ever read.

Oh, and I doubt that the real reason is McDuffie talked. That’s just a convenient excuse (and perhaps a warning to others in the stable). Axeing him for “talking” is marginally better PR than kicking him off the book so Geoff Johns can take over.

Good observations.

o if DC is pushing their ‘Nation’, ‘Source’ and Twitter informational stuff, talking about how open they are with the fans. And then fire a writer for being open with the fans……doesn’t that smack of hypocrisy?

That’s not hypocrisy at all, because editorial is okay with that information getting out. You know when creators come out and say “I can’t talk about that yet”? That’s because editorial tells them not to announce or discuss that project for whatever reason. I’m sure editorial didn’t approve McDuffie to more-or-less say “I was forced to rewrite the next few issues of JLA because of editorial interference and now they’re a mess”. As someone pointed out above, it’s basically a message of “don’t buy this book, it sucks,” which is something editorial doesn’t want him to say. All of the Nation/Source/Twitter is company promotion — McDuffie’s comments were whatever the opposite of promotion is.

Actually, this situation reminds me quite a bit about creators putting information on Twitter and then complaining that Rich Johnson and others publicize the information. Every grade schooler knows that if you tell someone a “secret” before recess that everyone in the class will know by the end of recess.

As a side note, while I am a big JLU fan, if the best work we were going to get from McDuffie was a rehash of the Injustice League and the Anasi the spider story… well, good riddance This entire JLA series has been a mess from the start and I really doubt McDuffie could fix that on his own.

I think Justice League might be a tough book to write for, especially today. First, there’s the age old problem of writing a team where many members have their own titles. A writer is forced to accommodate events in the home title, especially if they make the hero unavailable to the team (Batman RIP, World of New Krypton). That’s nothing new, but is probably becoming more frequent.

The second problem, which is related to the first, is what happens as more and more comics are being plotted as a universe instead of as individual titles.

Marvel’s probably doing it right by having the premiere team book written by the guy who is essentially plotting the path of the whole line. Whether you like Bendis’ work or not, it makes sense that the big stuff gets filtered through The Avengers.

Likewise, any universe spanning DC crossover logically should be going through the Justice League. They are supposed to be the top team and the ones supposed to take on the greatest threats. When the writer of that book isn’t even given clear indication that one of the team members is dead or alive, that’s a problem. I’m not necessarily saying that Justice League should only be written by Johns or Morrison, but as the “visionaries” of DC’s future, they and Dan Didio should make it a point to clue in whoever is writing Justice League, otherwise the book has no chance. It has to be heavily tied into most crossovers due to what the team is and who its members are. It shouldn’t just be there to address minor plot points regarding Salvation Run.

I don’t like to side with DC, but, if somebody came to me and complained about something the company had done, and I responded by explaining how much of an idiot the Senior Vice President of Marketing was for coming up with it, and gave a detailed public list of all the wrong decisions he had made, I’d be fired. That’s really just common sense.

Did you actually READ the quotes? He never called DC editors idiots. A better analogy would be if my boss encouraged me to interact with customers and then a bunch of customers came up to me complaining about how I ruined a company and was bringing it down by warping its vision, and I politely informed them “Hey, I’m just doing what the boss wanted. How can you accuse me of ruining his company with my decisions when I’m actually carrying out his decisions? I’m not hijacking the powers that be biggest propoerty or usurping their vision for it, I’m actually carrying out their vision.” The real problem is that DC editorial seems ashamed to sign off on their own handiwork.

I visited the DC forum after Rich ran the article, and it was pretty bland stuff. Fans asked why McDuffie did something, and he explained it with no real malice. This seems like a really tone-deaf move by DC (I know, par for the course for Didio(t), etc, etc). I can’t wait to see what Rich has to say about it on his new site next week.

In any case, I haven’t enjoyed this series at all. I picked up 1 issue in about 5 hoping to get hooked, but no dice. I guess a change in writer & direction is better than the same stuff over and over again.

The real problem is that DC editorial seems ashamed to sign off on their own handiwork.

Well the real problem is there are obvious and clear problems with DC editorial and the direction of the company. I don’t think there are any arguments there, especially when so many writers have had problems in the past few years. Hence I can totally understand why editorial wanted to sweep the drama under the carpet — it has already gotten out of hand, and it is even getting further out of hand. Sort of like that Iraqi reporter who said “The Americans are not in Baghdad” when there were US tanks rolling in the background.

Yet for all the complaints, as long as “huge cross-over events” still sell, editorial will be having a heavy hand in the direction of the books. It’s a simple fact of sales triumphing art. I’d love to see McDuffie or any writer tell the stories that he/she wants to tell without interference, but if people keep buying the huge-awesome-giant crossovers, DC will find a way to tie those books to books in the main line.

I don’t see how he “told people that the book was going to suck.” He basically just explained the reasoning behind some of the story choices that people had been commenting on.

I think it really boils down to this: DC was well within their rights to remove McDuffie from the book. But just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should do it. In dismissing McDuffie for his comments, and not because of the quality of his work or sales on the book, DC shows itself to be extremely thin-skinned, petty, and vindictive to the point of destructiveness.

As to the question of professionalism, Steven Grant’s recent thoughts on the subject in his Permanent Damage column are illuminating: http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=21109.

OK, T. Fight crazy hyperbole with more crazy hyperbole. I get it!

I haven’t bought the book in a while (because it didn’t make my budget cuts) but this thing sounds in need of a relaunch. Remember when McDuffie was going to be the savior, and now people don’t even talk about JLA like they did when it first launched this new volume. That’s super sad.

Vicius, I think the editorial needs a relaunch, not the book! No matter who they put on it, they will start sucking if working under the current regime. They even made 75% of Paul Dini’s output awful.

The injustice wasn’t that he got fired. The injustice is that he never actually got to write the Justice League of America.

DC has been screwing over talent since the Major was running things. It’s always been a petty and pompous company. But the fans – for the most part – don’t care about anything but the comics, no matter how much they claim to hate them – and the talent knows DC’s checks won’t bounce.

Speaking as a fan, you are largely right. I only care about the quality of the comics. However, I am no longer young enough that new comics are an every Wednesday ritual. I mostly buy stuff in trade that Brian, Chad and the folks on this web-site speak highly of. I hate buying stuff twice, so I buy the best format available the first time.

You know … like a book without pictures.

And like books without pictures, I really do not care who the publisher is. It makes no difference to me that Malcolm Gladwell is at Little, Brown. My connection with DC Comics is the characters. It is not even the shared universe, really. Marvel has a common origin point that DC really doesn’t. After twenty odd years, DC has not managed to manufacture one. So, I am not sure why they are still trying.

All of this is to say that DC would have to make a big mistake to lose my business. As long as they are producing quality books, I am happy to buy them. They can be G-Rated, PG-Rated, R-Rated or even X-Rated (provided it was by Alan Moore, or Bruce Timm). They can contradict each other. The creators can be furious and complain about the experience for twenty years (i.e. Moore and “Watchmen”). I really don’t care. I want two things from DC:
1. Good stories
2. The feeling that the folks in charge are good managers of the characters.

That is it. Even point #2 is very, very loose. I don’t think Batman and Robin are gay, but I would read a great story about them as a homosexual couple. I like Lois and Clark together, but I would happily read a great romantic piece about Superman and Wonder Woman (or Lana Lang, or even Supergirl). I am not a fan of the ultra-violence, but if someone wrote a brilliant, horrific story about Darkseid invading Central City that happened to be gruesome…. Well, you get the point.

These characters mean different things to different people and I am an adult with an open mind.

Where it becomes a problem is when the behind the scenes decisions make it less likely that DC will produce quality comics featuring the characters I love. It seems like we have reached that point with Dan DiDio. Folks that are likely to produce interesting comics are either leaving DC, or avoiding them. Worse, the folks that are in the chairs do not appear to have enough freedom with the characters they are working on to do anything interesting.

I don’t know who Vicius is ;) but I agree with you. Editorial should be on the curb for Countdown alone. Never mind Final “was this really a” Crisis.

Oops, my bad on the misspelled name brother.

“Oh, and I doubt that the real reason is McDuffie talked. That’s just a convenient excuse (and perhaps a warning to others in the stable). Axeing him for “talking” is marginally better PR than kicking him off the book so Geoff Johns can take over.”

This seems more than a bit unrealistic. Geoff Johns is writing, what, six titles (Adventure Comics, Flash: Rebirth followed by Flash, Green Lantern, Blackest Night, Tales of the Corps, Superman: Secret Origin, possibly one of the other Blackest Night minis)? If he’s writing JLA, then I have to believe they forced it on him because I don’t believe its a title he was actively seeking to get.

As far as this…I’ve said all I care to say on this subject at Robot6.

If it’s been mentioned, forgive me:

When I hear stuff like this, all I can think of is the floating Julie head in Ambush Bug Nothing Special explaining who has all the power…

Seriously, the reason I skim superhero comics off the rack rather than buy them anymore is because of the fact that editorial will make sure that nothing permanent will happen for any length of time (i.e., the status quo will be maintained because they’re afraid of lost sales…nothing I’ve ever seen regarding editorial has ever indicated to me that sales is not a driving force over creativity, though I’m sure there are some who want both). Oh, you may have a different character take up a mantle for a while, but sooner or later there will be a big event where the “original” returns (I’m looking at you Bruce Wayne and Steven Rogers…If Hal Jordan and Barry Allen can’t stay dead…) and we go back to square one with a different twist [or, the powers get altered, only to return to status quo later on, etc.]. The dynamic of editor needing to sell books vs. writer who just wants to write a good story can’t work when one side dictates everything; and the relationship makes it so.

And yeah, I know the sales argument is an old bit, but frankly, it’s a sad truth…the irony is, if they just let the writers write solid stories that take the characters to logical ends and develop them within plots that make sense rather than trying to make everything an epic, they’d probably find that the books would sell fine. I swear that I sometimes feel like I’m reading through the 90’s again without the foil covers, bagged comics, or holograms…

Thinking about it, I think my lack of surprise comes less from anything he said, and more from an awareness that DC had practically no respect for him.

DC Editorial was one of the reasons Alan Grant stopped doing Batman, too…

They wouldn’t let him write what he wanted, rather they wanted him to write stories they’d thought up instead…

“I’m reminded of when Colleen Doran trashed the ink job done on an issue of Sandman she’d done. On the one hand, maybe she needed to speak out to defend her work. on the other hand, maybe you should keep stuff like that in house.”

In that particular case, the inking job was so very poor, I’d say she had an excellent reason to speak out about it.

Does this effect McDuffie’s position writing Time Warner’s animated shows ( most recently, Ben 10: Alien Force )? I doubt it would, given the complete irrelevance DC’s comic line ( and Dan Didio especially ) have outside the comics industry, but I just want to know if his career remains unscathed by this.

The effect of poor inking on a penciller’s reputation can also be quite damaging since the average reader may not have the necessary skills to notice that the art looks bad because of inking.

@ smokescreen

The dynamic of editor needing to sell books vs. writer who just wants to write a good story can’t work when one side dictates everything; and the relationship makes it so.

Not necessarily.

To me, it is a question of trust. DiDio came from television, but not any TV with which I was familiar. He seems to want the DCU to operate like a soap opera with several different threads all weaving the same story. That is not the type of comics that interest me personally, but I get why he is interested in doing that. It is a logical extension of what Jim Shooter was trying to do at Marvel in the eighties.

In that model, the various writers are not telling their own stories. They are doing threads within the larger story of the DCU. Again, this is not my taste. I became a DC fanboy in large part because I could chose to read Superman, Batman, the JLA and the Flash while safely ignoring the stuff that didn’t interest me (i.e. Superboy). Every time I tried Marvel for a few issues, it seemed like the title would cross-over with Thor. I thought Thor and his silly helmet were lame, so I dropped the title. In that fashion, I dropped Spider-Man and the FF after a few issues. Only the Claremont-Byrne X-Men were safe from the dreaded Thor.

However, it is a valid way to run a comic book line. DC loses most of my business, but they probably more than make up for it with a few extra pulls from the every Wednesday person.

That said, readership needs to trust that they are being told a story they want to read. DiDio has no track record to support that assertion. It is not as though Warners backed the Brinks truck up for Bruce Timm and asked him to turn the DCU into his animated universe. Nor did they haul in Al Gough and Miles Millar to recreate their “Smallville” style in the comics. You only have the stories DiDio has created in his five years at DC to indicate what is coming next.

On the plus side of the ledger, we have Darwyn Cooke’s “New Frontier”, Morrison and Quitely’s “All-Star Superman”, parts of the Geoff Johns on “Green Lantern” and Gary Frank on Superman. On the minus side, we have Sue Dibny being raped and murdered, Ted Kord getting shot in the head, “Dark Mary” Marvel, Countdown, Final Crisis, McDuffie on JLA, Heiberg on “Wonder Woman”, the hash that has been made of “The Flash”, and etc. Maybe I am missing something, but it seems like the stuff that is good is the stuff that is the furthest from the core DCU story. Conversely, the stuff that is the worst is the stuff that is closest to that story.

In other words, maybe DiDio just doesn’t know how to craft a compelling narrative despite having the power to force his ideas on the DCU.

The solution, as always, is to just stop reading until things change.

DC has been screwing over talent since the Major was running things. It’s always been a petty and pompous company. But the fans – for the most part – don’t care about anything but the comics, no matter how much they claim to hate them – and the talent knows DC’s checks won’t bounce.

One last point on you comment, you seem to imply that the fans saying they hate the comics is an empty threat. It really is not. It is true that since the sixties, fans have stuck with comics longer and longer. However, it is also true that during that time sales for top titles have fallen ninety percent during a time when the population has doubled. “Superman” used to average a million issues per month and now “Flash: Rebirth” is supposedly a huge hit at 100,000. That is huge loss of readership.

I promise you that prior to the DC Implosion or the collapse of the ’90s collector bubble, people were complaining before they stopped buying the product. Then, a good chunk of those folks left and never came back. The difference between then and now is the Internet. One would hope that DC has P.R. folks reading fan comment threads and summarizing them for management. It would give them why people are opting not to use their entertainment dollar on DC Comics.

“Oh, and I doubt that the real reason is McDuffie talked. That’s just a convenient excuse (and perhaps a warning to others in the stable). Axeing him for “talking” is marginally better PR than kicking him off the book so Geoff Johns can take over.”

This seems more than a bit unrealistic. Geoff Johns is writing, what, six titles (Adventure Comics, Flash: Rebirth followed by Flash, Green Lantern, Blackest Night, Tales of the Corps, Superman: Secret Origin, possibly one of the other Blackest Night minis)? If he’s writing JLA, then I have to believe they forced it on him because I don’t believe its a title he was actively seeking to get.

Well other than the rumors that he’s been seeking it.
And you’re pretty much assuming that he’s still with Green Lantern after Attack of the Zombie Lanterns finishes.

(I’ll grant you can replace with Johns with Morrison, btw).

I figure Didio is just hoping no one points out that he fired the black guy for getting uppity.

Nitz: McDuffie mentioned on his blog that he’s still quite busy with the WB animated, Alien Force, antoher Ben 10 series, Evolutions, as well as a DC Animated movie. Here’s an interesting little nugget for you…McDuffie brings in much more $$$ for papa Warners than Didio does. Keep that thought in mind.

I think Didio covered the whole “editorial mandate” thing quite well in his Q&A.

Basically, all corporate books are done under the direction of an editor. If you don’t like it, go write your own stuff. Please.

I also think that if Dwayne was unhappy, he could have quit. As a freelancer, that’s his right.

Regardless, he has plenty of work and won’t be missing any meals, so no harm done.

Plus he’ll have more time to do that JLU movie. I hope!

red Ricky said:

“But if I remember Valerie D’Orazio’s case correctly; staff personnel may not have any rights either. ”

Any time you mention Valerie D’Orazio, you have lost the argument. ;)

…I worked at Milestone for some time, and actually overheard McDuffie go severely ballistic when one of the freelancers publicly offered a minor criticism of another freelancer.

Oddly enough, that happened online as well (though not in a company-supported website); in point of fact, McDuffie (and Milestone)’s kind of infamous for blackballing anyone and everyone who makes such ‘behind the scenes’ comments about ‘their’ beloved company, hence my ‘name’ – Try comparing the names of creators listed in the Milestone Wikipedia entry with a list of everyone who ever did more than 3 issues’ worth of work for them and you’ll discover some really fascinating, difficult to explain omissons…

Funny how these things come around…

“I also think that if Dwayne was unhappy, he could have quit. As a freelancer, that’s his right.”

Maybe that’s what he was doing, at least on some level. Too many people who jump right to the “what did he expect with that behaviour” argument fail to even consider this.
Pissing off the boss enough to fire you is a time-honoured and perfectly legitimate way to resign when you’re displeased with the way he does things.

Also,
jazzbo: you didn’t actually bother reading my clarification to McK, did you. I know full well that’s not the way it currently works. I’m advocating the kind of intrusive laws most Americans hate, just to make sure there’s no ambiguity.

Who would be the best choice to replace Didio? DC comics seems to have some serious internal issues. Issues that continue to ruin the readers, writers, and artist expierience while involved in the dc universe.

Jack, I did read your clarification, and I got that you’re advocating those kind of laws. I was saying I disagree with you, because I am one of those Americans that hate those intrusive laws.

And re-reading my initial post, I realize maybe I wasn’t totally clear. I wasn’t just trying to point out the way it currently works, I was also saying that I more or less agree with the way it currently works. There’s exceptions to every rule, of course, but I think a company should be able to fire whomever they please for pretty much whatever reason they please. If they fire good people for bad reasons, it will eventually bite them in the ass.

[…] did obviously have problems with DC editorial, Rich was involved in reporting on them on CBR Dwayne McDuffie Fired off Justice League of America an Injustice? | Comics Should Be Good! @ Comic B… Nope, it was my own doing. I was fired when “Lying in the Gutters” ran a […]

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