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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 154

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we look at what happens when an Irresistible Force (the Juggernaut) meets an Immovable Object (Spider-Man’s great responsibility).

Enjoy!

Okay, so the Juggernaut and Black Tom Cassidy have come to New York City to try to kidnap Madame Web, because they heard she had precognitive abilities (which would be useful to them). The Juggernaut leaves their ship (they were traveling by sea) and headed into the city by himself. All throughout Amazing Spider-Man #229 (by writer Roger Stern and artist John Romita, Jr.), Spider-Man fought against Juggernaut but basically could do nothing to stop him.

In Amazing Spider-Man #230, Spider-Man tries again. He uses all he can think of, and finally decides to commandeer a oil tanker and drive it at the Juggernaut, leaping out just before the truck hits the Juggernaut.

Here’s what happens…

I’m torn over what “the” moment is – the actual defeat of Juggernaut or the explosion? Romita really went nuts with that explosion – he drew it phenomenally, but I suppose Spider-Man’s refusal to give up may just be “the” moment in this instance.

33 Comments

The moment? It’s Spidey’s refusal to lose for me. This story did for my generation what Amazing Spider-Man # 33 did for the Boomers. Stern and Romita Jr. were the last great Spider-Team in my book! Every issue of their run was solid gold.

Spider-man rocks!!! =D Loved this issue as a kid!

My favorite is the stone cold look in Juggernaut’s eyes when he says “Nothing can!”
Spider-Man’s unyielding determination is cool, but that’s a dime a dozen in Spider-Man comics. It’s not often we see such frightening self-confidence in a villain.

I loves me some Roger Stern, but I tend to think this story is a bit overrated. It doesn’t show Spider-Man’s unstoppable determination so much as it shows him panicking and throwing everything he can at an enemy rather than using his head. This is exacerbated a bit by his shock when he realizes that gasoline tankers make pretty big explosions.

“Oh lord, what have I done?” Well, what did you think you were doing, Pete?

Still a good read, but it doesn’t live up to the hype. Stern did better.

This story and the one when he takes out Firelord were two of my favorites growing up

Welding his helmet to the uniform. Showering.

Gotta be problematic.

No, Juggy, the hydrant doesn’t count.

This may be my first Amazing Spider-Man comic. At most my second or third. It blew my mind. Man oh man did it blow my mind. At this time Amazing Spider-Man had Stern and at the same time Marvel Tales started reprinting the Lee/Ditko run. I discovered the two greatest Spider-Man runs at once. Nothing’s measured up since.

Wow, is Juggy a jerk. Did we ever see him portrayed any more evil than here? It makes Marvel’s efforts to rehabilitate him a few years ago look REALLY inappropriate.

Don’t get me wrong; I liked the idea of a rehabilitated Juggernaut. It just doesn’t seem to mesh with this story.

The Mad Maple

June 4, 2009 at 6:48 am

This was one of the first comics I ever read, and it’s DEFINITELY the oldest one I still remember. To me, it always will be the defining Spider-Man moment.

Wow, I remember when Juggernaut was an awesome villain.

Man I miss the old style of comic book. Reading those pages took longer than reading any modern Marvel.

Had Juggernaut disabled the web-shooters? I can’t remember, but I assume that’s why Peter didn’t simply web up his eyes.

And how does Spidey know that Juggernaut can hold his breath? I mean, WE know he’s a magical being, but for all he knows he just drowned some poor mutant in an ugly helmet in 40 feet of concrete. That always bugged me when I read this as a kid – Peter doesn’t seem too concerned that what he just did would kill roughly 99.9999% of people even in the MU. :)

(Yes, I know he doesn’t need air, but Peter doesn’t bother to think about saving Juggy before that, either. Just rings a bit weirdly.)

This reminds me of Juggernaut’s first appearance as well (another great moment). The X-men pretty much hiding while the Professor activated wave upon wave of lethal defenses, and the Juggernaut just walking through them.

Cool, but the Firelord fight was cooler still.

I think Juggy’s line “Nothing Can!” is the moment for me. That panel, that line, pure confidence.

God I’ll always remember these two issues, along with the Stern/JRjr run in general. A golden run for me in comic book history and far, far too short at that.

I never realized how many other people felt the same way about this battle as I do until I started paying attention to this site about a month ago. It was a great validation for me. I got out of spidey not long after the DeFalco/Frenz run started. When I got into college in the early 90’s, I ran into a couple current Spidey fans in my dorm. I dug out my copies of this run and shared it with them at the time, but they poo-poo’ed it in favor of the McFarlane/Larsen/Michelinie issues that were considered solid gold at the time. It’s nice vindication to see, all these years later, that the Stern/JRjr run held up so well, better than some of those McFarlane/Larsen/Michilinie issues they were waving in my face in that shabby dorm room so long ago.

As far as Spidey not knowing that Juggy didn’t need to breath – I believe that early in issue #229, Madame Web told Spidey that she saw the Juggernaut rising from the river. I think that, coupled with the fact that he just saw Juggernaut survive a firery explosion which would have probably sucked all the oxygen out of the lungs of any living thing within proximty, would have provided reasonble grounds for a smart guy like Pete to conclude the breathing wasn’t an issue for Juggy.

Damn, I sure did like my Spidey back in those days!

i would go with the moment when juggernaut comes walking through the flames proving what he means by nothing can stop him. that to me is one of the greatest omg moments ever that plus juggernaut freaking when he starts sinking in the cement.

Yes, the wow moment here isn’t the explosion. It’s Juggernaut surviving the explosion. This story was basically The Terminator but one year before the movie (IIRC).

What about when he stomps through the fire hydrant and starts literally steaming? It’s a great visual analog (think of a fuming cartoon bull) to Juggy’s ire at Spider-Man, who pre-explosion he only regarded as a pest. That’s the moment for me, though John Romita Jr. draws the heck out of that explosion.

As I recall, Juggernaut’s invulnerability aura allowed him to just slough off Spidey’s webbing.

Wow, is Juggy a jerk. Did we ever see him portrayed any more evil than here? It makes Marvel’s efforts to rehabilitate him a few years ago look REALLY inappropriate.

Don’t get me wrong; I liked the idea of a rehabilitated Juggernaut. It just doesn’t seem to mesh with this story.

I don’t see why not. Juggernaut doesn’t really do anything terribly evil in this story at all. First, he takes a beeline for Madame Web, which is through some buildings yeah, but he never goes out of his way (which is exactly the point, that Juggernaut simply refuses to go “out of his way”) to cause any one harm. As for Juggy’s attitude toward Spider-Man, Spider-Man had been hectoring him all morning, launching, in Juggernaut’s mind, unprovoked attacks against him (webbing up his way, hurling I-beams at him, and, as you saw, ramming a tanker truck into him at high speeds), so it’s only natural that Juggy would snap back at some point.

I really felt that this two-parter infused the Juggernaut with a unique personality as a villain, one who was not truly evil or misguided, but just sort of self-centered and single-minded. My favorite line of the arc occurs after the Juggernaut tears Madame Web unknowingly from her life support systems, notices her dying in his arms, and then drops her spasmodic body to the floor, whining that “She’s no good to me dead. I came all this way for nothing.” Man, what a great line, not “Ha ha, take that you old bag!” but a simple grumble of disappointment, like a kid who arrives at the toy store only to find that his hot item was sold out.

Had Juggernaut disabled the web-shooters? I can’t remember, but I assume that’s why Peter didn’t simply web up his eyes.

He blew his load spinning a web-wall between two buildings in the Juggernaut’s path (which didn’t work, obviously).

How did Juggernaut get out of the cement?

I love how Spider-man beats the odds so many times and still can’t get any respect from the big boys. I think it’s my favorite aspect of the character. The miserable little creep.

I’m with Ellis Wyatt. Peter didn’t think his way out of this situation. He lucked into Juggernaut walking into the concrete. That seems out of character. Did he already use up all of his best ideas earlier in the story?

“Juggernaut doesn’t really do anything terribly evil in this story at all.”

“Juggernaut tears Madame Web unknowingly from her life support systems, notices her dying in his arms, and then drops her spasmodic body to the floor, whining that “She’s no good to me dead. I came all this way for nothing.””

These two statements do not mesh.

For me the moment is that last panel of page 17, when Juggernaut discovers he’s sinking.

“Juggernaut doesn’t really do anything terribly evil in this story at all.”

“Juggernaut tears Madame Web unknowingly from her life support systems, notices her dying in his arms, and then drops her spasmodic body to the floor, whining that “She’s no good to me dead. I came all this way for nothing.””

These two statements do not mesh.

They do. He’s a comic book villain, so if his biggest wrongdoing is kidnapping for personal gain, he’s not that evil. Again, he didn’t know that he was ripping her from her life support systems, and it’s not like he could just reassemble them for her. I didn’t say Juggy was Christ cubed, just arguing that this story doesn’t set him beyond redemption or portray him as more evil than in other stories.

To Bob & Ellis Wyatt:

It’s true. Spidey didn’t think his way out of this one – he lucked into the resolution with the concrete. That’s kind of the irony of this particular story – Spidey tries all the convetional stuff (attempting to physical stop him with webbing, spidey strength, et al), to no avail. Then he tries some of the more clever things (electrocute him at Madame Webb’s door, drop a building on him at a demolition site, the gasoline tanker seen above), also to no avail. Finally, out of desperation, he just covers Juggy’s eye holes and holds on for dear life and – voila – Juggy meets 40 cubic tons of fresh concrete – hence the irony. Nothing Spidey could do or think up was going to stop this guy. But it wasn’t just blind luck that lead to the resolution – it was also Spidey’s perserverence in the face of the unbeatable – which is really what the story was trying to highlight anyway.

So, yeah, I agree we can’t credit the resolution to Spidey’s intellect. It was his perserverence in the face of impossible odds that got them there (with, admittedly, a great deal of luck) – but that was kind of the point of this story. I read an interview with Stern where he said the idea was to put Spidey up against someone way out of his weight class. That’s what made the story so fun and memorable.

@Ed…I figured it was something like that. Now I want to read the whole story.

The Stern/JR Jr. run proves a point. It’s probably the best Spider-Man run that doesn’t involve Stan Lee and there are NO deaths, ressurections, uniform changes (Stern actually bailed because of the black uniform), identity revelations, marriages, divorces and other stupid events. Just solid stories!

And Stern did only two significant changes to Spider-Man. He took him out of post-grad (a bad move in retrospect, but graduating him from both high school and university were already bad to begin with and at least this time the character could actually get back without major retcons) and created a new archnemesis (Hobgoblin). Both very minor.

You don’t need “change” to have good comics, you only need QUALITY!

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

Lots of cool moments here, hard to pick just one…

Noone’s pointed this out, but it’s nice that the friendship between Juggernaut and Black Tom was reinforced as well.

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