web stats

CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 176

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we take a look at a cute moment involving the Dibnys!

Enjoy!

Justice League Quarterly #6 has some of the earliest Mark Waid writing for DC Comics, with this engaging tale (with art by Eduardo Barretto) of one of Ralph Dibny’s “birthday mysteries” that his wife Sue comes up with every year – but this time around, IS it one of Sue’s mysteries or not?!!?

Sue disappears and this is how Ralph reacts…

The rest of the extra-long story involves a great deal of twists and turns until we learn that it IS an elaborate ruse, involving the Martian Manhunter pretending to first be Sue (and then “disappear” by turning invisible) and then the villain behind the “kidnapping” and also having Sue pretend to be Ice.

So here’s the wrap up, which involves a great conclusion to the bit and just makes me miss the Dibnys a bit more than usual (whenever I read a good Dibny story I get a pit irked when I finish the story)….

What is “the” moment? The revelation that Ralph knew the whole time (and Waid wrote that into the script nicely)? Or Sue’s look at the end?

I lean towards the former but the latter is good, too.

22 Comments

… This must be like the one prominent Elongated Man appearance I don’t own. I MUST HAVE IT

I’ve always loved Eduardo Barretto’s art on this series.

The Crazed Spruce

June 25, 2009 at 10:02 pm

I used to own the first dozen or so issues of JLQ, and as silly as that story was at some points, it was still pretty damn entertaining. (And I didn’t catch the bit with the envelope ’til the second or third time I read it.)

My favourite issue, though, was the one where they go up against the mad scientist Ira Quimby, who exposes six of the heroes to a gas that turns one in six people into a homicidal maniac. The story ended with a really cool Blue Beetle moment that definitely belongs on this list.

IIRC this is one of the few issues of Justice League Quarterly that I kept when I got rid of most of them.

If not, it should have been.

You should have picked the part of Secret Wars II where they Beyonder makes himself up like Michael Jackson.

Barretto’s art is always loveable, especially the ladies. :-)

I agree, Sue never looked better than she does here. Barreto draws the loveliest women. I’ve always enjoyed his European art style on anything he does. Very realistic, elegant work.

Hmm… so is Sue’s expression in the last panel telling us the Hippos in top hats were her REAL birthday mystery?

And this, in my opinion, is what’s wrong with Identity Crisis. Even if you ignore the massive retcon, it simply takes the characters too far outside their milieu. It’s not that you couldn’t do a serious story with them. It’s just that they’re not suited for a tragic one.

By the way, I just realized that comics had the goofy guy married to the hot woman who’d normally way out of his league long before it became a sitcom standard.

I loved the use of the Dibnys in Starman and was upset to find out about Identity Crisis. Next chance I get I’ll have to track down this issue.

Yeah! I think this story really summed up the Dibnys for me. Ralph IS the World’s Greatest Detective…

Never realised it was Mark Waid who wrote it, but it does make a lot of sense now, seeing as he’s so good at writing strong couples…

“By the way, I just realized that comics had the goofy guy married to the hot woman who’d normally way out of his league long before it became a sitcom standard.”

Not really. That one goes all the way back to the original sitcom, The Honeymooners.

Hell, I Love Lucy was that same dynamic, only with the genders switched.

JLIQ was probably the last decent JL book after Giffen & DeMatteis had left. And I always enjoyed it. I mean, The Conglomerate has always been a favorite of mine and certainly the direction I would have taken Booster Gold if I ever got writing it.

What I always liked about the Digby’s and the early Hank Pym and Janet van Dyne stories, was they were screwball comedies and happy couples. Oh well. Both the MU and the DCU are sadder places since they decided there was no place for this type of story and this type of characters.

I don’t know … my favorite part was misreading the “Duckhead Detective” line.

“Truly you ARE the DICKHEAD DETECTIVE!”

“Thanks, Dimitri, you stupid piece of #$%^!”

Bwah hah hah …

i always went with sue look of shock that ralph figured out the mystery right away mostly because martian manhunter was posing as sue using his right hand. sad that dc sent ralph and sue to the after life

Ralph and Sue were always the Nick and Nora Charles of the Comic Book World, and we need them back.

Ralph & Sue were one of the best parts of JLE–done very well in many issues.
I loved their mini series as well.

My favorite part here is J’onn’s off-panel “Sorry.”

nice nipples

@ Carl

And this, in my opinion, is what’s wrong with Identity Crisis. Even if you ignore the massive retcon, it simply takes the characters too far outside their milieu. It’s not that you couldn’t do a serious story with them. It’s just that they’re not suited for a tragic one.

Exactly!

In their origins, DC characters tend to have classical tragedy and comedy masks put on them. Stories about tragic heroes are about death. I never mind when those titles turn grim. Batman is a tragedy, so is Green Lantern. Their origins set their eventual fates in motion. I mean, Abin Sur wasn’t retiring to some resort planet.

Conversely, Superman and Wonder Woman are classical comedies. From the very beginning, they are dealing with the attraction between men and women. There are tricks and mistaken identities. They are dealing with the same themes as something like “Sex and the City”. So, I am never bothered by sexual content.

The Dibnys are very clearly under the comedy branch. It is just wrong to drag them through a grim, tragic story. It has nothing to do with what makes them interesting. Mark Waid does a nice job encapsulating the appeal in the scans above. Ralph is a bit of an odd duck, but Sue finds his quirks exciting. There is a vulnerability, since she is way out of his league in the looks department. They are just a great, great pairing.

Looks like a fun story. Seriously, DC screwed up this couple why, exactly?

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives