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Breaking Broken News: Open Letter To The Internet Re: That James Robinson Comic

Dear Comic Book Bloggers,

I get it. The first issue of James Robinson’s Justice League comic is bad. Really, really bad. Terrible. Risible. Like a Frankenstein’s monster of all the hacky cliches everyone hates about modern superhero comics (or it’s an average DC comic, if you’re T.). It is the worst thing in the history of ever, at least until the next issue comes out, or Jeph Loeb ups the ante with Ultimatum 2: Ultimatumer, Or: There’s Still Some Meat On Ultimate Wasp’s Corpse! Get To It Blob!

So, if you wanted even people who were pretty well ignoring it (including Joe Sacco, apparently) to know it’s risibly bad, mission accomplished. I’m pretty sure they know on the moon now. So, really, unless you are Abhay, Jeff Lester, or someone else who I like to read no matter what dumb crap they’re reviewing, you can all shut the hell up about it forever now.

Sincerely,

The One Guy On The Internet That Did Not Purchase This Comic And Missed Out On A Chance To Mock It Before It Became Cliched, But Is Not Bitter About It At All, Seriously, And Can You Believe This Is Also On My Business Card? That cost a ton,

Brad Curran

P.S.: Is it still funny to point out that the logo looks like it says “Gay for Justice”? Was it ever? Is Chris Butcher going to put me on “the list” if I say it’s funny? Does Chris Butcher have a list? Does he still read this blog despite our fear of penises being on par with the women in South Park? Is Cronin pissed because I brought all that up again? Will Omar Karindu and Apodaca ever admit their secret love for one another? When did this turn in to a Days of Our Lives teaser?

58 Comments

Prof. Adrian Zoom

July 7, 2009 at 4:14 pm

am i the only guy that liked the book? :/

Probably.

I cry “justice” for my $4 back.

I agree 100% with everything you wrote, Mr. Curran. I would also like to add that I didn’t read it, either.

Although I would like to admit that “Gay for Justice” was funny the first two or three times.

i liked the book too!

People are being a little harsh on the book, but it wasn’t that good. Compared to a lot of trash that gets published, this was just not very good. What sucks, and why it is getting the flack I think is because DC is shilling it as a PRESTIGE BOOK something that is AMAZING and a TPB that will be sold for years to come with Robinson’s annotations collected in the back.

I liked it. I admit I thought a couple lines came off a bit corny, but overall I really enjoyed it. Honestly though, my favorite part is the essay in the back. I love when James Robinson talks about his work, main reason I’m buying yet another copy of Starman in the Starman Omnibuses.

Actually, it looks like there’s at least TWO of us guys on the Internet who didn’t buy it and missed out on the putative opportunity to mock it. I’m the other one!

I wasn’t planning to buy it, still haven’t bought it, and don’t know that I will ever bother to read it. But I might after the first arc is in TPB– these days I almost always wait for the trade. By the time the trade comes out, I’ve usually heard enough to have some idea of whether or not I am anxious to actually read the silly thing. (I might mention in passing that I still have read none of 52, Countdown, or Amazons Attack, and don’t really feel I’ve missed any golden opportunities.)

The beating of that dead horse was worth it just for all the stuff you wrote after “Sincerely”. Good show.

Does “Cry for Justice” feature any rape, gore, dismemberment or cannibalism? If the answer is “no” then it was not the worst to come out of DC in recent years.

(And if the answer is “yes”, all I can do is sigh and continue to avoid buying DC comics…)

It’s not THAT bad…people just like to dogpile on things to feel part of the in-crowd (One More Day, Death of Spoiler, Evil Batgirl, etc) and then move on to the next target. I’m sure the miniseries will improve as it goes on; this is James Robinson we’re talking about.

At worst, the dialog was bad and hackneyed, which is so unlike Robinson.

But the art was great. And I trust Robinson with making D list characters like Congorilla and Starman #whatever great.

I think the backlash — which Joe Sacco has pointed out, is really, REALLY huge to the point that the negative reviews are more hackneyed than the actual comic — is relative to how much DC has promoted this book as THE BEST JUSTICE LEAGUE STORY THAT HAS EVER BEEN WRITTEN. They have been promoting it since 2007, I think, hence the letdown. Plus, we normally expect great things from Robinson, so anything less is… frustrating.

But it all honestly, it can’t be any worse than what Jeph Loeb is writing in Ultimatum (had to say it!)

@Sijo: apparently it features the meaningless death of a black superhero. Perhaps “black” is the new “female”? I can’t wait for Kyle “I Was Green Lantern For Longer Than Alan Scott And You Bitches Still Disrespect Me” Rainer to come home to find Black Lightning, Black Manta, Black Starboy and Mr Black Terrific all stuffed into his fridge. THAT will be rivetting story-telling for the ages!

@Aqualad: I suspect people hate it specifically because it’s James Robinson. He is one of those of whom it is assumed Comics Should Be Good by default, so when they’re not, they’re REALLY not.

For my part, I just want to make it clear this was the timeline of my Cry For Justice review-writing experience:

1. Decide that this week, seriously, I’m going to do capsules. – Wednesday
2. Actually receive comics due to being Canadian. – Thursday
3. Start reviewing Cry for Justice. Get distracted and drunk. – Thursday night
4. Continue my review of Cry for Justice. Get distracted and drunk. Come back later, continue writing. -Friday night
5. Look at review, realize some of it doesn’t make sense, change it. Realize EVERYONE AND THEIR MOM has written a Cry for Justice review at this point; decide to make it first to continue trend. It’s still longest review for some reason. (I swear, I wrote it before everyone else!) Then I finally reviewed a bunch of other comics. -Saturday morning

My point here is that I didn’t mean to add to the dogpile, I swear! It was mostly written when things got bad!

Curran’s massively overreacting to an (actually not that big a deal) overreaction.
Maybe someone should overreact to his overreaction to the overreaction, and then someone could overreact to THAT overreaction, and so on and so on…

It’s disappointing that for the longest time the main JLA book is not what I’ve been enjoying over the last decade.

Now I haven’t read the Cry for Justice series, and yet I saw a deluge of negative reviews (save for one rare 5 star review on this website) that I’m already curious to see what the fuzz is all about. I sincerely hope that as the series progresses, this is going to be a better spin-off than the main book. I hope.

Or I could always read the previous JLA series: Waid, Morrison, Kelly stuff.

@Aqualad:

I have not read the book yet. Having said that, I don’t think the reviewers are dogpiling on the book. The messsage board posters and blog readers may be, but the reviewers don’t give two farts about being in the in-crowd. If they did, they certainly wouldn’t be reviewing super-hero comics as a pass time.

I think the vitriol against the title stems from the VERY high expectations it garnered: It was James Robinson who is somewhere between Grant Morrison and Jesus F. Christ in DC’s stable of writers. It was Mauro Cascioli’s painted art. It was the Justice League when the Justice League has been all but unreadable since the beginning of the most recent series.

Everybody KNEW this was going to be the next Watchmen, or the next Tangent Comics, at the very least. And it wasn’t. It just wasn’t.

And this isn’t even a situation where the story’s just getting going and you need a couple issues before you really get into it. This is a situation with laughably bad dialogue and graphic storytelling that doesn’t make any logical sense.

I feel bad for everybody involved. Robinson, Cascioli, even Didio. Everybody was expecting this series to lead into Robinson tenure on the primary and it’s return to greatness. But this thing is flopping in such monumental, Pluto Nash-like levels, I’d be surprised if Didio removes Robinson from JLA before he can even get started.

“Does “Cry for Justice” feature any rape, gore, dismemberment or cannibalism? If the answer is “no” then it was not the worst to come out of DC in recent years.”

Those things don’t necessarily make a comic bad.

As a matter of fact, sometimes they can add a bit of excitement, fun and hilarity to an otherwise forgettable venture.

I liked it, but I’m not the one writing the reviews while trying to show my peers how witty I can be trashing a comic book. It really looks as if the reviewers are reviewing for the reviewers. Incest at its best?

Hey, fondle the balls a bit while you’re down there, Alan.

The Ugly American

July 7, 2009 at 8:30 pm

“Does “Cry for Justice” feature any rape, gore, dismemberment or cannibalism? If the answer is “no” then it was not the worst to come out of DC in recent years.”

Well, we don’t really know what happened to all of Congorilla’s ape family, exactly.

So… maybe?

@Alan Coil:
You’re making it sound like all reviewers are more concerned with impressing other reviewers, like they were all 12-year-olds. For that to work, they’d all have to agree on every comic they review, which they certainly don’t. It also implies that the reviews are all snarky dismantlings in the vein of The New York Tiimes movie reviewers, when comic reviewers are for the most part, just like the rest of us, except with the drive to put their thoughts to blog. And it implies that reviewers think their reviews actually impact their readers’ buying patterns.

The only thing a comic book reviewer wants is a good story and value for his money. Cry for Justice #1 didn’t deliver that. The handful of reviews I read were well-thought out and mostly snark-free.

Andrew Collins

July 7, 2009 at 9:43 pm

I’m beginning to feel like a member of an exclusive club here, the “Didn’t Buy Cry For Justice #1 and Could Care Less About The Comic Club.”

Though we call ourselves DBCFJ1ACCLATCC for short…

Rohan Williams

July 7, 2009 at 9:44 pm

“Everybody KNEW this was going to be the next Watchmen…”

These people deserve to be disappointed.

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

July 7, 2009 at 10:51 pm

I wasn’t aware it was “secret.”

Also, Cry for Gay Justice sucks. It could’ve worked as a concept, but it sucked.

Omar Karindu and Apodaca are gay? (Here’s the part where one of you chimes in “For Justice!”) Hmmm, no, no, that’s no good, totally trite and out of character. Apodaca, you say something biting and terse and Omar, you say something enlightening.

Hmmm, just as I was typing that, Omar responded with something witty and terse. You’re doin it backwards, man! See above.

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

July 7, 2009 at 11:04 pm

Hey, babe, take a walk on the Wilde side.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 7, 2009 at 11:42 pm

Maybe someone should overreact to his overreaction to the overreaction, and then someone could overreact to THAT overreaction, and so on and so on…

That post was so bad, and so pointless, that I forced an abortion upon my seven month pregnant girlfriend, just because I was so scared that the child could grow up and write something as terrible as this.

“That post was so bad, and so pointless, that I forced an abortion upon my seven month pregnant girlfriend, just because I was so scared that the child could grow up and write something as terrible as this.”

And yet somehow, you followed it up with a post that was EVEN WORSE. Sublime.

My theory about the “overreaction” to Justice League is this.

You know how you do something really trivial and your significant other flies off the handle about it in a way totally out of proportion to the transgression. And upon further probing you realize the fight isn’t really about the trivial transgression? It’s been building for a while and that trivial transgression was the breaking point that was used as an excuse to air out all the grievances that have been building beneath the surface for the past year or so?

I think that’s what’s happening with Justice League. It’s a combination of so many cliches that we’ve been subjected to repeatedly for the past few years, from whiny petulant dick heroes to heroes going dark to bad purple/pulp/badass narration to the proactive superteam vision that never lasts that it’s become the breaking point that people are using to vent all their frustrations at about the past few years of comic cliches. It’s like any cliche that’s been annoying you from the past 5 years, here’s a one stop shopping book you can use to bitch about it. It’s almost like therapy.

I loved it, fantastic art, introduction to the main players and extras in the back (Len Wein Congo Bill!!). Definitely worth the price. Even if I hated it, it’s still worth the price.

The book was bad. We deserve JUSTICE.

JUSTICE!!!!!!

ULTIMATUMER!!!!!!!!

-” “Does “Cry for Justice” feature any rape, gore, dismemberment or cannibalism? If the answer is “no” then it was not the worst to come out of DC in recent years.”
Those things don’t necessarily make a comic bad.
As a matter of fact, sometimes they can add a bit of excitement, fun and hilarity to an otherwise forgettable venture.”

If you like such stuff, be my guest. But -believe it or not- lots of other people don’t, especially not in a SUPERHERO comics. Gore is as out of place there as Lack of Gore would be in a slasher movie.

My problem with DC is that these days you can never tell where such stuff will turn up, not even Teen Titans or JLA.

@Sijo: May I suggest a safe, gore-free alternative for you? Owly seems right up your alley.

All kidding aside, I agree that sometimes as of late it’s been too much, but I for one kinda liked seeing what happens when someone with super-strength forgets (or flat out doesn’t bother) to hold back against non-invulnerables. Suddenly, you have a big bad that’s a force worth reckoning, posing a serious threat to everybody. Some of that uber-violence at DC was part of a war as well, and war is never bloodless. A little dose of reality makes the universe believeable.

Sijo: I don’t LIKE the things with blood and gore and I don’t LIKE things WITHOUT blood and gore.

I like things that are GOOD.

Sad Professor

July 8, 2009 at 2:24 pm

Geez, you guys are taking this way too seriously.

The facts are these: “Cry For Justice” isn’t just a bad comic, it’s a spectacularly bad comic. It’s an awesomely awful comic. You know those remixes people do of terrible comics? Doing one on this book would be redundant. “Ultimatum” is nothing like “Cry For Justice.” “Ultimatum” shows up on your doorstep and just sits there like dog poop. There is some disgust when you first notice it, but once you remove it from your sight, you forget about it.

“Cry For Justice” raises awfulness to a level of high art. Everything about it isn’t just bad, it’s bad taken to such an extreme that it loops back around to become entertaining. I have no idea how many times I’ve read it already, but it’s got to be double digits. I haven’t opened an issue of “Batman & Robin” more than two or three times each, and hands down, that’s the best super hero book to come out since “All-Star Superman.” “Cry For Justice” is the “Plan 9 From Outer Space” of comics. They should have midnight showings of it like they do “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” or “Troll 2″ so people can dress up and enjoy it in groups.

Honestly, this is the best worst comic of all time, and I swear, if they maintain this level of quality, I will buy each and every issue, and then get the trade on top of it. I cry for more. I cry…for “Cry Of Justice!”

@badspock: you’re correct, if the world of superheroes WERE realistic, horrible things would happen *a lot*. But I buy superheroes PRECISELY because they’re unrealistic. I’m here to watch heroes fight super-bad guys and ALWAYS WIN, which are *decidedly* unrealistic things. Whenever I want to hear about mayhem or sexual crimes, I only have to turn on The News. Can you make dark but still good stories with superheroes in them? Of course, but it’s hard, and worse, you risk losing your an audience while trying to pander to another. But what REALLY gets me about DC is that they’ve decided such things are OK to drop AT ANY TIME ON ANY TITLE. When it was restricted to, say, Batman, I simply avoided the Bat-titles and was happy. But NO book of theirs is safe to read anymore (except their children’s line) and I won’t buy them until I feel they are again.

@Chris Jones: I like good things too. Too bad taste (unlike quality) is relative. What is good to you might be horrible to me, and vice versa. All I know is, I don’t *care* for cheap shock tactics on my superhero books.

You know how movie studios delay the opening dates of stinkers by sometimes years before they let them slide out? This is like that. This was supposed to be an ongoing series, and now they’re dumping it as a limited series a year late in the shadow of their blockbuster crossover (Blackest Night) and their critical darling (Wednesday Comics) and hoping nobody asks what that smell is. I can only hope that Robinson learns from this experience and the flame-roasting he’s getting before taking the reigns of the ongoing series from poor, unfairly-jerked-upon Dwayne MacDuffie.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 8, 2009 at 5:55 pm

It’s a combination of so many cliches that we’ve been subjected to repeatedly for the past few years, from whiny petulant dick heroes to heroes going dark to bad purple/pulp/badass narration to the proactive superteam vision that never lasts that it’s become the breaking point that people are using to vent all their frustrations at about the past few years of comic cliches. It’s like any cliche that’s been annoying you from the past 5 years, here’s a one stop shopping book you can use to bitch about it. It’s almost like therapy.

Yeah, Avengers really has gone off the rails.

Yeah, Avengers really has gone off the rails.

Avengers is definitely lacking direction and focus these days and riddled with cliches, but you can’t seriously believe it’s in the same category of awful as Robinson’s Justice League can you?

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 8, 2009 at 7:33 pm

I haven’t read Robinson’s Justice League – I thought you meant like ‘Justice League’ all up as a book/concept the past few years.

Which is fair, as it’s all been a mess from what I’ve heard (I was waiting to read McDuffie’s, but not doing so seems the wiser option) – just thought it was odd to pick on one franchise and not point out that the other, despite being less interfered with – is just as full of the same complaints.

But if you just mean Cry For Justice, then fair enough.

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

July 8, 2009 at 7:37 pm

Avengers is definitely lacking direction and focus these days and riddled with cliches, but you can’t seriously believe it’s in the same category of awful as Robinson’s Justice League can you?

New Avengers is a trainwreck, it’s just a slower-moving train wreck. Massive chunks of the plot — rogue SHIELD agents resurrecting supervillains and mining Vibranium illegally; Maria Hill learning about House of M by ripping open Spider-Man’s mind — go unbremarked upon or undeveloped for years, and then become the basis of other books and New Avengers itself forgets all about them.

In the meantime, the New Avengers themselves have,s o far as I can tell, achieved absolutely nothing since Civil War, with the villains either winning or being thwarted by elements that would’ve turned up even without the team’s involvement. And that’s not mentioning stuff like the Hood ‘s supervillain syndicate being utterly ignored so the book can meander about with a Dormammu plot and give us Doctor Voodoo and his cancel-me-please spinoff title, all while the ostensible protagonists manage to do jack to affect matters.

Think about it this way: the Avenegrs books were able to completely suspend their plotlines for several months running to give Secret Invasion flashback infodumps.

Sijo: “But NO book of theirs is safe to read anymore (except their children’s line) and I won’t buy them until I feel they are again.”

I’m sorry Sijo, but maybe your delicate sensibilities would be best served by reading the children’s line. Because basically it seems like all you want to read is fairytales.

“All I know is, I don’t *care* for cheap shock tactics on my superhero books.”

Sure, but are we talking about ‘cheap shock tactics’ or what you see when you “turn on The News”? Because ‘the News’ isn’t cheap, its true. While it is clear that you would rather comforting lies rather than the truth, does that make it “quality”? Is your thesis basically that Cinderella and Snow White are better than Full Metal Jacket or Apocalypse Now because the earlier would make you *feel* better.

Are you really talking about GOOD comics, or just NICE comics?

@Sijo: While I don’t necessarily agree, I Do see where you’re coming from. Think on it like this-the money you will save by passing on modern monthly titles could be put towards volumes of the DC archives HCs. There’s enough silver age reprinted between those and the much more affordable Showcases to keep you in the type of superhero reading you enjoy (hey, I enjoy reading silver age stuff too, even if a lot of it IS painfully silly at times.)

@Sijo: While I don’t necessarily agree, I Do see where you’re coming from. Think on it like this-the money you will save by passing on modern monthly titles could be put towards volumes of the DC archives HCs. There’s enough silver age reprinted between those and the much more affordable Showcases to keep you in the type of superhero reading you enjoy (hey, I enjoy reading silver age stuff too, even if a lot of it IS painfully silly at times.)

I’m not trying to nitpick or single you out, but this point you make is one of my pet peeves. Why do people always think that if you don’t want excessive gore and sex and gruesomeness popping up randomly in your superhero comics you automatically must want painfully silly Silver Age stuff? Once again, not targeting you specifically but I do see this inability on the internet to acknowledge a possible middle ground. The 70s and 80s had a ton of books that perfectly tread this middle ground.

@Ted & badspock:

Two words: Sgt. Rock.

I was just reading the second Showcase volume last night, and it’s the furthest thing you can imagine from silly. But it’s also the furthest thing from the torture porn and graphic violence that many current superhero comics partake in for the sake of “realism” that Sijo’s talking about. I put this kind of stuff in the same category as the recent trend of super-villains killing secondary heroes, just so the reader will take them more seriously.

I don’t WANT to take the super-villains seriously. I want them to have ridiculous plans to take over the world by cornering the market on pudding pops. I want them to rob Fort Knox with a flute. I want them to use a red rock to turn the most powerful man on the planet into a cat.

Think about it. Do you really want realism in a story where a bored billionaire beats up clowns? Do you want really want realism in a story about a psychic gorilla goes up against a guy who runs really really fast? Do you want realism in a story where the universe’s most powerful weapon is a piece of jewelry?

I’m not saying super-hero comics can’t address serious issues. Green Lantern and Green Arrow did that each month in 8 pages. But the level of violence we’ve seen since Identity Crisis or thereabouts is gratuitous. It’s torture porn. It’s not necessary to the visceral enjoyment of believing a man can fly. And that’s all I want from my super-hero comics.

@Wesley

“furthest thing from the torture porn and graphic violence … that Sijo’s talking about”

But THAT’S not what Sijo’s talking about. He said “I’m here to watch heroes fight super-bad guys and ALWAYS WIN.” Heroes can lose and there can still be NO torture porn. I haven’t read Sgt. Rock but did he ALWAYS win? If he didn’t then Sijo CANNOT read the comic. If he does always win then I would say it is pretty silly, and certain says nothing about war.

Sijo said he didn’t want to read about “mayhem or sexual crimes”. Is WAR mayhem? I would say so. So again Sijo CANNOT read the comic.

“I don’t WANT to take the super-villains seriously.”

Yeah, but who were the bad guys in Sgt. Rock? If I am not mistaken, and I may be, they were Nazi Germany. The only way I would not take Nazi Germany was if they were treated in a silly fashion. But you said Sgt. Rock was “the furthest thing you can imagine from silly” so I have to imagine you DID take the villains seriously.

“I’m not saying super-hero comics can’t address serious issues.”

But Sijo IS. If superheroes can NEVER lose then what issues can be explored. You raise Green Lantern and Green Arrow, but they did LOSE in that comic, sometimes (i.e. Speedy becoming addicted, Hal not caring about Black people, etc.) As far as I can tell Sijo CANNOT read that comic either.

Sijo doesn’t just want to get rid of “torture porn and graphic violence”. He wants to get rid of all risk, of all possibility of questions of power, grief and morality, of all serious issues at all. Sijo, and perhaps you too, only want to read fairytales. And there is a place for fairytales, but I don’t think it is in the Marvel U or DCU.

Sorry, that was me above.

Wesley – great call with Sgt. Rock. Discovered it at my public library in archives form and was really impressed.

I agree with T and Sijo on this.

If these creators want to do schlock and gore DC should just have a horror line for that and then let superhero comics be more of the middle ground that can engage young and old alike. I think this is actually more effective than having super titles divided into overly watered-down childrens lines and utterly classless adult ones.

I feel like I’m arguing against a brick wall.

Sijo isn’t arguing for a “middle ground”. He is arguing for the nothing-bad-ever-happens, all-nice extreme.

Sijo to me is arguing for a middle ground. He didn’t say he wanted nothing bad to ever happen, he just doesn’t want it taken to shock-value extremes involving extreme gore and sex crimes. And he wants the good guys to always win in the end. You can have all those things and not have a product that’s a nothing-bad-ever-happens, all-nice extreme.

@ T: I pointed out SA stuff because the archives and Showcases are readily available pretty much everywhere, while trades of a lot of the 80s stuff might be harder to get.

And honestly, I didn’t like a lot of the 80s stuff from either of the big two, Justice Leage International being the exception to that rule (and the early issues of that have been reprinted recently in HC and trade-might be good stuff for Sijo to pick up, but it IS kinda a comedy….).

It WOULD be nice to see more trades of 80s stuff for you lot who dig on it though, and for those of us needing to bridge gaps in runs of certain books.

@T:

Well said. I was trying to say the same thing, and it took me three times as long to say it.

Wow, I seem to have stirred up some controversy. That wasn’t my intention, but, as long as it is conversation (” I disagree with you because…”) and not pettiness (“I dislike what you say so you suck”) that is OK. Conversation is what I post for in the first place; otherwise why bother? (Sorry if this sort of derails the thread, but then again, the “Cry for Justice sucks!!” jokes were getting thin.)

Let me state a couple of things: First, I’m *not* just a superhero fan. I’ve enjoyed many genres, from realistic ones to even some horror. It all depends on my mood at the time; sometimes I feel like watching an examination of the underbelly of humanity, and sometimes I feel like escaping into a world where the good guys always win. I’m sure many of you feel the same way. But every genre has conventions, and for a reason: we expect certain things about them, that’s why we buy them. If I’m depressed after hearing about how much worse the world has gotten on the News, then the LAST thing I want to do is read a comic featuring rape or murder at that moment. Which is why I buy superhero comic instead.

I’m not saying that DC has ruined all of its comics. There’s still (from what I hear, in places like CBR) a lot of talent working for them, and producing some great comics. What DC did from, for me, was to state that horrible things could happen, in ANY of their titles, at ANY time. Is that realistic? Yes. Do I WANT that in the superhero comics I buy? NO. Worse, it’s pretty apparent they’re doing it as a cheap sales gimmick. “Is X title selling well? No? Kill somebody off. In as graphic a detail as you can. Eaten alive, even.” And don’t assume I came to this conclusion overnight; it took me years, of having shocking scenes pop up in all kinds of series, and of reading the comments made by Dan Didio and his cohorts. This is no accident; DC has “gone Hollywood.” Worse, it seems unnecessary. Marvel is (for the most part) free of such things (even Civil War was not nearly as bloody as DC’s current Big Events) yet they continue to sell as well as DC. Their really bad stuff (Marvel Zombies, Punisher Max, etc.) is easy to avoid (or seek out, if that’s what you want..) Dc won’t give us that luxury, and until I feel they do, I won’t buy any of their titles regularly. (And I know I may miss on some good stuff in the process. But I’d rather not take the chance. Your opinion of course, can vary.)

I just want to pop in to say that Steven Grant addresses this issue (or the issue this has turned into) over at his most recent Pemanent Damage column.

And for once in my life, I got the answer to his quiz, and I did it without the clue. :D

[...] we recorded this podcast, Justice League: Cry for Justice has been dogpiled by an all-star cast of bloggers. It was relatively fresh news when we recorded, but it’s still a pretty bad [...]

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