web stats

CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 189

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today, we take a look at a neat Greg Rucka story from the Bruce Wayne: Murderer? storyline.

Enjoy!

Okay, to set the scene, Bruce Wayne has been (presumably) framed for murder, and both he and his bodyguard, Sasha Bordeaux (who secretly has been working with Bruce as a crime-fighting vigilante) have been put in Blackgate Prison while awaiting trial.

She can see him (she’s in the women’s side of the prison, he’s on the men’s side), but he’s ignoring her. She is protecting him, but she honestly can’t say for sure that he’s NOT guilty – it’s not like she even knows him all THAT well, and he has been a lot moodier recently and more violent.

Meanwhile, her time in prison is rough, as she’s subject to attacks from the other prisoners.

So we get this great little sequence in Detective Comics #767, by Greg Rucka and Steve Lieber,

I just loved how well Rucka establishes the relationship between the pair.

“The” moment would be the touch, of course.

I just love that bit, “Oh, of course, duh, he’s Batman, obviously he didn’t do it.”

Classic.

34 Comments

Tom Fitzpatrick

July 9, 2009 at 5:22 am

If Bruce Wayne didn’t kill Vesper, then who did?

I always thought he did it. ;-)

Although I hated the resolution to this storyline (not going to spoil it, but… it’s pretty bad), everything building up to that was really good work. You could tell that Rucka sort of thought it through like he would one of his usual mystery novels.

My only real complaint about this is that they ditched the bichromatic colour scheme that ‘Tec had prior to the crossover. Never understood why that happened, as it gave the series a distinctive look (that Ed McGuinness did a great job of emulating during a crossover with Adventures of Superman that probably should be on this list for the visuals alone)

Say what you will about those two storylines, those two arcs were filled with some hardcore moments.
Love it!

I adored those early Detective issues, too. That color was gorgeous and I could stare at those covers for hours.

Disliked everything about that story, especially the Sasha character, who feels very out of step with the rest of the Bat-verse.

@Steven – yeah, the end of this (I guess really the epilogue, which led to Sasha’s current – ? – status in the DCU) was a bit of a “Well, I guess that wraps up all the loose ends around he – Oh, CRAP!” feeling.

What IS that policy regarding spoilers of a years-old story, anyway?

That’s a cool scene.

Disliked everything about that story, especially the Sasha character, who feels very out of step with the rest of the Bat-verse.

Can you elaborate? I’ve never read the story. I did read Sasha’s subsequent appearances during Final Crisis and found her insufferably annoying enough that I resolved never to read anythnig with her in it again.

Ethan Shuster

July 9, 2009 at 6:17 am

I kind of like the choice to have her “narrating” thinking happening alongside her, “they put a dead goddamn rat in my bed” thoughts.

“@Steven – yeah, the end of this (I guess really the epilogue, which led to Sasha’s current – ? – status in the DCU) was a bit of a “Well, I guess that wraps up all the loose ends around he – Oh, CRAP!” feeling.

What IS that policy regarding spoilers of a years-old story, anyway?”

Yeah, I never read this storyline and probably never will but to get a gist of what everybody’s talking about I read a concise summary. But I’m still curious to know why this arc’s ending was so disappointing. It does sound like a pretty bland resolution both in the identity of the conspirators and in how Batman deduces it.

Ok, I’m just gonna say it, after this THERE MAY BE SPOILERS! So if you’re waiting on the 25 anniversary trade to come out before reading the Murderer/Fugitive arcs read no further!

Not much of a bodyguard if she can’t take two unarmed women in a fight.

I really liked the scene when a bunch of other cons come to attack Bruce Wayne in his cell. As you might guess, it doesn’t come out quite like they expected.
I won’t go into more detail, just in case Brian wants to use it later in the list.

@Stephen:

i completely forgot about that new coloring scheme! that was so good, especially in that ra’s al ghoul storyline and parts of the ‘who shot jim gordon?’ arc…. really brought an awesome visual flair to the book

I own page 22 from this issue! Nice! (for sale if anybody wants it! LOL –> http://www.comicartfans.com/GalleryPiece.asp?Page=1&Order=Date&Piece=46965&GSub=80987&GCat=0&UCat=0)

that was one of the moments that proved that bruce cared for sasha as he does every woman and that sasha was in love with bruce even though hated the whole storyline.

Murray, you lucky dog.

While I’m usually okay with spoilering stuff from old arcs, this is specifically a whodunnit (well, at the end – Murderer is more like a prelude to what we eventually got with Gotham Central… and I guess it’s more technically a whodidntdunnit). It’s been 75 years or so since Murder on the Orient Express, but I’m not going to spoil that ending, either. Just kinda seems to miss the point.

I thought Sasha fit in just fine as Bruce’s bodyguard. It’s like Karl Kesel’s reasoning for adding in Rosalind Sharpe to the DD books during his run – it’s always good to make sure you have someone who DOESN’T know the hero’s secret identity, which the Batbooks were very much lacking at the time. And given the tone of the Batbooks at the time – Dick was a police officer, the Birds were still in the more espionage-ish era, etc. – Sasha’s bodyguard character seemed to fit in just fine.

The moment should have been “He didn’t do it. He’s the goddamn Batman.”

T, it just felt like Bordeaux was a walking plot device shoe-horned in specifically for the arc, and that while she got her ass handed to her a few times, she still seemed TOO good at what she did, to the point where once she discovers Bruce’s identity, he simply starts training her as an apprentice. It felt, well, I hesitate to say it, but almost Mary Sue-ish in terms of how abruptly she appeared and integrated herself into the Bat-world, only to be pulled away and then later used in future titles. Maybe I’m just too irritated at the lack of non-powered, non-crime involved supporting cast members there seem to be in current superhero titles.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 9, 2009 at 5:45 pm

Maybe that was an awesome scene in the storyline and at the time… but taken on it’s own, it falls flat.

Mike Loughlin

July 9, 2009 at 5:51 pm

I liked the storyline, Sasha’s character (haven’t read anything with her since, except an Infinite Crisis Special, Final Crisis Special, and Checkmate 1), and the reasoning behind her discovering Bruce’s identity. The ending was a bit weak (although I liked the final confrontation well enough), but there were some high-quality issues in the story.

I liked Sasha at the time, but yeah, I’ve definitely felt that she was way too much of a pet character from that point on.

Hey, I’m pretty sure I didn’t read that one.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 9, 2009 at 7:11 pm

I liked Sasha at the time, but yeah, I’ve definitely felt that she was way too much of a pet character from that point on.

I do like Rucka’s writing, but it seems to me whenever he’s on a company owned book (which is always these days), he has a clear stand out pet character.
One of the most annoying aspects of Gotham Central, for me, was that he only ever wanted to write about Montoya.

I just look up what a character being ‘Mary Sue-ish’ means. And that’s my lesson learned for the day.

How long ago did Montoya get outed as a lesbian? I’m guessing it was once they started fleshing out her character more, but was she gay from the get-go or tdid hey just never brought it up one way or the other? Most of what I remember about Montoya is either her just showing up with Bullock after Bats had done his thing and her supporting role in the animated series.

I didn’t read this storyline, but even the little I read of her during Infinite Crisis era made me sick of her. I kept thinking, “Who is this chick and why is she being given such prominence?”

How long ago did Montoya get outed as a lesbian? I’m guessing it was once they started fleshing out her character more, but was she gay from the get-go or tdid hey just never brought it up one way or the other? Most of what I remember about Montoya is either her just showing up with Bullock after Bats had done his thing and her supporting role in the animated series.

She was written as straight before Rucka, but she was gay as soon as Rucka started writing her (that is to say, as soon as he began writing her, he felt that she was gay and that’s how he wrote her, even though he did not “out” her for some time after he started on the Bat-titles).

And do note that when Rucka started writing her, he did not know about any past stories saying otherwise, so it was not like he thought he was “changing” anything – he thought he was the first writer to deal with Renee’s sexuality, and he felt strongly that she was gay.

Thanks!

[…] A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 189 (goodcomics.comicbookresources.com) […]

Seems to me like he wanted a gay character, and Rene just fit the bill. It works in the way it does for Karma – there’s no past behavior to contradict it. Unlike, say, characters like Rictor, who a writer just decides must be gay.

Sasha is a Mary Sue, and kind of annoying, but there have been worse, before and since.

What’s the difference between deciding Rene’s gay versus deciding Rictor’s gay (which I had completely forgotten about)?

Well, Rene we hadn’t seen much of anything to suggest she wasn’t gay. With Rictor, there wasn’t anything to suggest he was gay, what happened was Jeph Loeb started writing X-force and somehow thought he was based on misreading (or skimming) the title before he started…

Renee Montoya, before Greg Rucka, was written straight ever since she turned up first in The Batman Adventures cartoon then the comics (Batman 475). She even had a boyfriend who died during the Clench/Contagion run in Batman.

Really? I’m not sure if I think the lesbian retcon is good or bad or a little of both. But the more I become aware of which comics Rucka wrote the less I seem to like him as a writer. He’s very… average, I guess.

If I recall correctly, Rucka dealt with the previous boyfriend(s) as part of bringing her out of the closet. People dating straight (and even marrying straight) before realizing and/or coming to grips with their homosexuality happens all the time, anyway.

Renee being outed didn’t jar me or feel wrong or out of character, so I’d have to say that Rucka handled it well.

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives