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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 193

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today starts SCALPED WEEK!!! All cool comic book moments from Jason Aaron and R. M. Guéra’s awesome series, Scalped!

Enjoy!

Okay, the basic gist of the story is that Dashiell Bad Horse had come back to the reservation he grew up on (and ran away from as a young teen) as an undercover FBI agent, trying to take down the head of the tribe, Chief Lincoln Red Crow, for murder.

He gets hired on as a member of the tribal police force, and here, he has to deal with Diesel, who has been causing some trouble at the newly opened casino on the reservation (this is in issue #8 of the series, written by Jason Aaron and drawn by R. M. Guéra).

Diesel has some issues with being called a “White boy,” as seen here, earlier in the issue…

Dash comes to bring him in, and things get ugly, as the two have a long, dragged out fight that goes on for many pages and involves a stolen horse, leading to right now…

“The” moment is probably the end, but the “I’m a real Indian” speech is good, too.

Tomorrow we’ll look at a nice scene at the end of this issue…

22 Comments

The second Scalped trade will be in my box of comics this month. I am looking forward to it.

I’m all caught up on the Scalped trades, and the wait for the next one is grueling. That book is so ridiculously good. I should probably switch to the singles at some point, to get a more frequent hit.

Hrm…

You really should, Ian.

The singles are great.

Month in and Month out… still Vertigo’s best title.
I’m looking forward to more Scalped Week. Great choice

Vertigo’s only GOOD title…

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 12, 2009 at 7:15 pm

Vertigo’s only GOOD title…

YEAH!

Oh, except for DMZ, The Unwritten, Northlanders, Fables, Hellblazer, and Young Liars (for one more month).

Scalped is really as good as everyone says it is. Chock full of good stuff and cool moments though I hope Bad Horse comes back into the focus of the story in the next trade. And Scalped might be the originator of Burgas’ current pet peeve with all the jumps in time.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 12, 2009 at 9:15 pm

Does Scalped jump in time that much?

It will spend a lot of time on one particular day, and then the next issue covers weeks, but apart from the storyline where it told the same night from different characters points of views, when has it played with time?

(Apart from the probable mistake of the main characters age changing, and a seemingly – for the moment – contradictory version of how Bad Horse became an FBI undercover, it hasn’t really played with time at all).

It jumps in time often.

This issue jumps into Diesel’s past frequently, and it also tells a non-sequential plot in the main story.

i would go with the two still fighting and being so stubborn to try to one up each other they they just let the bull charge them instead of getting out of the area and also liked the i am a real idian crack made to really tick off disel

Scalped really isn’t as good as I hoped. I check out the new issues when they come out and even gave the first trade a chance but it just isn’t as good as the hype. A few cool moments aside, I find it unnecessarily gratuitous and I’m surprised I haven’t heard some sort of outrage about the portrayal of Native Americans.

That said, I like the character of Diesel (issue 26 was awesome) and maybe more of these cool moments will turn me around.

Funky, I have the worst memory for the specifics of such things and I get everything out of the library, so I can’t really argue my point effectively. But in addition to the story you mention, I think there’s a time jump at least once an issue or at the very least, several times a storyline. Even Gravel in Your Guts starts with several people arriving at the bar and gunshots but doesn’t actually show the scene until the end of the trade. So then even the entire storyline of the kid becoming a drug runner takes place in the past even if it’s told sequentially. The time jumps may have been reduced since the initial issues but I think they’re one of the reasons the story-telling is so effective. And when I say time jumps, I’m including flashbacks as well just to be clear. And while these instances aren’t as egregious as “20 seconds from now”, they could still be the reason other people at DC are playing with time.

Anyone know if Bad Horse from Dr. Horrible had his name come from Scalped?

Yeah Scalped! I buy the monthlies because based on it’s sales (in non-tpb form anyway) this comic looks dangerously close to getting cancelled. And that would suck because it’s always one of my absolute favorites, though this arc that just passed about the casino robbery suffered from some odd momentum shifts. But no matter what, Guera on art is just great to look at.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 13, 2009 at 5:57 pm

And while these instances aren’t as egregious as “20 seconds from now”, they could still be the reason other people at DC are playing with time.

Yeah, all true – I just don’t think anyone could see it as intrusive, Scalped has had a lot more thought put into it than the issue Greg was complaining about.

Scalped really isn’t as good as I hoped. I check out the new issues when they come out and even gave the first trade a chance but it just isn’t as good as the hype

It’s a cumulative thing – I think if you’d stuck with it sequentially, you’d be a lot more impressed. The first trade is good, but it takes a big leap forwards after that.

A few cool moments aside, I find it unnecessarily gratuitous and I’m surprised I haven’t heard some sort of outrage about the portrayal of Native Americans.

It’s not really about Native Americans though – it’s using that as a setting for a story about living life on the bottom of the bottom.
If it was saying ‘this is a story about Native Americans and all Native Americans are like this’ then there’d be justified outrage, but it’s just using a reserve as a setting for a story about sad and desperate people doing bad things to survive.

Two Indians beating on each other…a typical SCALPED comic.

Why would a Lakota in South Dakota care whether someone from Oklahoma was 1/16 or 15/16 Kickapoo? Either way, the Kickapoo is an outsider from another part of the country. I doubt Diesel would fit into a “foreign” tribe any better than Jason Aaron or I would.

Actually, several Natives have expressed outrage over SCALPED’s stereotypical portrayals. Others like the comic because it presents the harsh realities of (some of) today’s reservations, even if it grossly exaggerates the problems.

Some Natives also root for the Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians because they like to see “their” names in the win column. Some Natives don’t think much about how stereotyping affects their people.

Re “If it was saying ‘this is a story about Native Americans and all Native Americans are like this’ then there’d be justified outrage”: The outrage is justified because Aaron has said he’s researched Indians and wants people to learn from SCALPED. In other words, he’s positioned his work at an authentic look at Indian life today. If Aaron had said his stories bear little relationship to reality, he’d be right, but he hasn’t said that.

See http://www.bluecorncomics.com/scalped.htm for more on the Native stereotypes in SCALPED.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

July 16, 2009 at 4:21 pm

And some Italian-Americans hated the Sopranos for it’s ignorant portrayal of the Italian-Americans, whilst apparently the FBI have recordings of mobsters discussing which characters are based on which associate of theirs…

I think if you step back, you’d find that bits such as the diabetes, and abundance of drug and alcohol problems are the ‘authentic’ look at Native Americans, whilst the crime bits aren’t meant to be.

So yeah, sure, if you want to get outraged, go for it – but as with most good fiction that causes people to get their knickers in a knot, if you step back and THINK, you’ll see there’s no point.

I mean, you don’t see too many Brits complaining that Hellblazer provides a negative stereotype of working class England, and yet it story after story of people doing horrible stuff to each other.

So Italian mobsters love the “Sopranos” portrayals of them indulging in wine, women, and wanton violence without fear of repercussions from the police or FBI. In other words, the glorification of the mob lifestyle. And the 99.99% of Italians who aren’t mobsters think the portrayals are stereotypical. Hmm…I think I’ll go with the vast majority over the tiny minority on that one.

The Indians’ poverty-related problems are real, but Aaron hasn’t distinguished between these and his portrayals of Indians as criminals, thugs, and lowlifes. He’s implied everything in his stories is based on research. Naive readers who know nothing about today’s Indians will have no way to tell what’s real and what isn’t. They’ll swallow it all.

Oh, and it’s another fiction that every tribe is opening a casino and that casinos inevitably lead to corruption and crime. In reality, South Dakota’s tribes don’t have mega-casinos because they’re too far from population centers to make money. But on Aaron’s prototypical reservation, large-scale Indian gaming is a given.

More to the point, the Prairie Rose casino is all about enriching the few at the expense of the many. This is one of the most pernicious Native stereotypes in existence and Aaron is exploiting it to the hilt. If you think the typical SCALPED reader understands Indian gaming and knows Aaron is falsifying it, you may be as naïve as the readers I mentioned.

In short, I’ve stepped back and thought about Native stereotypes a lot more than you have, friend. You’re kidding yourself if you think the media’s portrayal of Indians as crooks, losers, and victims doesn’t harm them. Check out “The Harm of Native Stereotyping: Facts and Evidence” (http://www.bluecorncomics.com/stharm.htm) and educate yourself on the issue.

Dudes, ignore Rob Schmidt. He’s been on this hate campaign against “Scalped” for almost 3 years now. It’s beyond played out now.

It started with stuff like this, right with the release of the very first issue. “Boo-hoo, a crime series depicts criminals! They should have more scenes with NICE Native Americans!” Jason Aaron actually responded to him at first, being very polite and patient in his defense of “Scalped”. But Mr. Schmidt repeatedly responded by being incredibly rude and confrontational, making sweeping assumptions about the book’s direction and intention (for example, he steadfastly sticks by the belief that Red Crow is a one-note thug based solely on his issue 1 depiction). Schmidt said that Aaron was a phony because he claimed the book was popular, but couldn’t find any Native American readers who liked it. Aaron defended himself by saying that he’s had plenty of positive feedback from Native American readers, and some even made their presence known to back Aaron up. Schmidt dismissed this by saying “Oh, Native Americans are just happy to see themselves in fiction, they don’t care how badly they’re depicted.” Which, by the way, was probably a more insulting assumption than any Aaron has made in “Scalped”. Anyway, it got to the point where even Jason Aaron gave up and basically told the guy to get lost.

It’s obviously less about moral outrage with him, and more about self-promotion. It obviously pisses Rob off that he’s spent all this time writing his own Native American comic, “Peace Party”, only for this Johnny Come Lately to come along with “Scalped” and totally upstage him. Hence his repeated attempts to undermine “Scalped”. And, at every turn, a link publicising himself. “Scalped is crap, but PEACE PARTY is much more accurate – more info on this link here.” “I proved that Scalped is prejudiced in MY BLOG, which you can find on this link here.” “Me me me, look at me, Jason Aaron’s coat-tails have an indent of my death-grip on them by now…”

>> It obviously pisses Rob off that he’s spent all this time writing his own Native American comic, “Peace Party”, only for this Johnny Come Lately to come along with “Scalped” and totally upstage him. <<

Yeah, that's why I mention SCALPED only once every few months. Because that helps my self-promotional efforts so much better than mentioning it daily or weekly.

And that's why I spend 99.9% of my time discussing Native topics other than SCALPED: the Cobell settlement, Obama's tribal summit, global climate change, the sweat lodge killer, "Twilight," Indian mascots, "We Shall Remain," and on and on. My 7,400 blog postings and 1,900 Web pages on Native and multicultural subjects are all coded messages proving my disdain of SCALPED.

In short, how stupid can you get? Pretty damn stupid, obviously.

No, of course not every one of your postings is about “Scalped”. But conversely, it seems like since 2007 there can hardly ever be a press release or a positive article about “Scalped” without your name inevitably popping up to parrot the same old stuff trashing it, then provide a link to your stereotype-busting site or shill your “more respectful” comic.

The strenuous backflips you go through to try and come to the conclusion the book is pursuing a racist, anti-Native agenda were somewhat amusing at first, but over time have become increasingly tiresome.

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