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The Top 70 Most Iconic Panels in Marvel History – Day 4

Okay, in case you didn’t see the introduction, the concept is that each day up to and including the 24th of August, I’ll be posting three iconic panels from Marvel Comics’ 70-year history (panels meaning any single enclosed drawing, including single page splashes). On the 24th, you folks will get a chance to pick your Top 10 out of the 70 choices. I’ll tabulate the votes and I’ll debut the Top 70 Most Iconic Panels in Marvel Comics History on August 31st. In the meantime, feel free to e-mail me (cronb01@aol.com) with suggestions for panels for me to use!

Here’s the next three panels!

Avengers (Vol. 1) #4….

Fantastic Four (Vol. 1) #1…

Amazing Spider-Man (Vol. 1) #50….

33 Comments

The one from Amazing Spider-Man #50 was the first one that sprang into my head when you announced this project. Can’t get much more iconic than that — they even did it in the movie.

The other choices so far have been really impressive. More than the “365 moments” series (which I also really enjoy), this series is about distilling it right down to the snapshots that stay with you years later. I’ve got a couple more in mind that I expect to see, but I’ll keep them to myself for now. Good stuff!

Bah! Where is the great and powerful Doom? Doom’s origin is nothing BUT one iconic panel after another.

Bring on the Bad Guys! (In seriousness, though, this is a great series. Really enjoying it.)

Love this list so far, but the second one I don’t really agree with. Then again, it’s your list, not mine. The rest of them so far rock!

I bet we’re going to see a lot of splash pages like the 3rd one. I’ve wondered whether a splash page should count as a panel…but what they hey, if it wasn’t iconic, it wouldn’t have been a splash page.

Believe you me, Adam, I debated the whole “should we let splash pages” count, but really, I don’t see a super compelling reason NOT to let them in, and the REMOVAL of splash pages would remove enough “iconic” moments that their exclusion would be noticeable, so I decided to let them count as panels (I mean, after all, what are they but really big panels?).

my pick is spiderman number fifty even though the avengers one is also good the spiderman one has more touching and heart pulling to it.

I dunno about that FF one. Seems pretty… blah to me.

What is amazing to me is that such a shocking splash page as the one from ASM #50 was used in the middle of a self-contained issue. In contemporary comics, a panel like that would be the last page of the issue, ending in a cliffhanger (of course, contemporary comics would probably take six issues to tell the same story, but that’s a different tale…)

To nitpick a bit, Amazing #50 is really part 1 of a three-parter, even if it does work on its own.

That above was me.

I completely understand why the FF panel is in there.
Besides being Kirby, almost everything he laid pencil to was iconic, this was the fateful moment when there was no turning back for them.
The Avengers realizing they found Captain America is iconic, sure. But, I think the better panel would be just after when he wakes up, springs off the bed screaming Bucky’s name, and immediately attacking the Avengers.
However, I’m gonna have to go with the flow here and put my 2 bits in for Spidey. Out of the 3, Spidey’s panel is the most iconic.

UGH! The FF origin is awful. A brilliant scientist sneaks through an open gate with one sleepy guard and steals a rocket. For some reason he takes his girlfriend and kid brother thus exposing them to criminal charges when they get back. The rocket, just luckily enough is fueled and ready for launch and you are able to launch it without ANY help from a ground crew. Well they have Ben Grimm, a fighter pilot in the war. Y’know WW2. That was like 16 years earlier. No idea what that has to do with piloting a rocket. They somehow get the thing into space without scrambling the entire Air Force or managing to set off nuclear war when Russia sees an unannounced rocket launch coming out of the U.S. Then somehow there’s not enough sheilding, they crash from how many miles up? and walk away and by the end of one issue they come up with code names for themselves (Reed decides on “Mr. Fantastic”? Really?) and devote them selves to fighting crime. And somehow even though the entire thing is a massive F-UP costing the government millions no one gets arrested even for one minute.

This was Stan’s first, and worst origin. He’d get better pretty darn quick.

Charles Fortier

August 4, 2009 at 11:17 am

I would like to nominate the two page spread from Captain America #176, with the caption, “So much has happened since then.”

I just don’t understand how that security guard doesn’t catch them. I hope he got fired.

Great so far, but I’m not with today’s FF panel. Other than that, GOLD!

I’d never actually seen that Avengers one before. It’s stunning.

My problem with the FF panel is that nothing about it screams “Fantastic Four” – I mean, if you never saw that panel before, and if it didn’t have the FF #1 caption above it, I think a lot of readers that aren’t very familiar with the Silver Age would be like “What the heck is that panel all about?”

If it is Iconic, it should tell the story quickly without any room for confusion. You don’t need to know any thing about ASM #50, or really Spider-Man at all (except what his costume looks like, which I would guess nearly everyone in the Western world knows) to know that he quit and threw his costume in the trash! I mean, that is a defining moment that rings with clarity.

That FF panel? That could be any four idiots stealing a rocket in purple jumpsuits. Hell, it could be Challengers of the Unknown (yes, I know they are DC) or something like that for all I know without you telling me that its the FF.

Kitty Pryde phasing a giant effin’ bullet through the planet. Because Cassaday needs to be on the list. And so does Kitty (But Paul Smith’s “Professor Xavier is a JERK!” panel would do nicely.

I can think of a bunch of Cockrum X-men one’s: Storm blasting Lorna at the airport (“This is no game, Polaris!”) from #97; Jean on the shuttle at the end of #100, with the radiation killing her;

and from Byrne Jean’s demise from #137 on the Moon; the Sentinel killing Wolverine in #142 (how many times have we seen that since?)

Should Peter’s thought, “But the years have a way of slipping by..of changing the world around us..” be appended to include, “…unless I can make a deal with the devil to turn the clock back.”?

I agree with the comments on the FF, If I was picking a panel from that book it would have been where the ship was in the air and the cosmic radiation was penetrating it. (unless that was added later, but that is what I remember)

The Spidey and Cap panel are both iconic to me, yes I remember Cap waking up as clearly but I think this panel is probably a little more iconic because it brings Cap into the Marvel universe.

The problem with any selections from FF #1 is that the iconic image of that issue is actually the cover. In terms of storytelling panels, though, nothing really stands out. The image in the first post of this series comes closest, I think, and is probably the only one necessary.

The panel with Dr. Doom pulling out his pistol and shooting his reflection in the mirror when he took off his mask, FF Annual 2, page 16.

“I can’t bear it! I must destroy it!”

Iconic

fastball special

“UGH! The FF origin is awful. A brilliant scientist sneaks through an open gate with one sleepy guard and steals a rocket. For some reason he takes his girlfriend and kid brother thus exposing them to criminal charges when they get back. The rocket, just luckily enough is fueled and ready for launch and you are able to launch it without ANY help from a ground crew. Well they have Ben Grimm, a fighter pilot in the war. Y’know WW2. That was like 16 years earlier. No idea what that has to do with piloting a rocket. They somehow get the thing into space without scrambling the entire Air Force or managing to set off nuclear war when Russia sees an unannounced rocket launch coming out of the U.S. Then somehow there’s not enough sheilding, they crash from how many miles up? and walk away and by the end of one issue they come up with code names for themselves (Reed decides on “Mr. Fantastic”? Really?) and devote them selves to fighting crime. And somehow even though the entire thing is a massive F-UP costing the government millions no one gets arrested even for one minute.

This was Stan’s first, and worst origin. He’d get better pretty darn quick.”

I agree completely. This is one origin that I’ve always been embarassed to explain to non-comics readers, and knew that the F4 movie would have to change. Because everything about that origin is retarded.

I don’t know about the second or third panels. The first one is a must.

The first and last ones are GOLD.

LouReedRichards

August 4, 2009 at 9:29 pm

Well I’m pretty sure Stan and Jack didn’t really give two shits what a bunch of people would think about the FF’s origin almost 50 years in the future. I’m thinking they really just wanted a bunch of ten year old boys in 1961 to think it was nifty enough to keep buying more comics with them in it.

They had been having enough success with the same kinda origin concepts for the bazillion monster from space stories they had cranked out, what’s one more goofy origin gonna matter?

I’m not saying that the FF’s origin is great, but without it we wouldn’t even be having this discussion.
Beside, it’s not like most of the other Marvel (and many DC) heroes origins are really that much better.

Avengers 4 was amongst the first mags I read so discovering Cap in the ice is a great image. Also Johnny Storm discovering the Submariner in the Bowery
or Ben walking into the seamonster with a bomb strapped to his back
or Peter Parker telling the Torch where to get off in Spidey 21 I think
Thing and Hulk tearing apart Manhatten in FF25
the splash page of FF 51
At the end of Silver Surfer 5 the surfer lights an eternal flame for Al B Harper…
-you got me started now..

Bernard the Poet

August 5, 2009 at 2:30 am

“This was Stan’s first, and worst origin. He’d get better pretty darn quick.”

A teenage boy gets bitten by a radioactive spider. This gives him incredible strength, agility and the ability to inexplicably sense danger. He invents a pair of ‘web shooters’, which can fire a sticky thread. These shooters are psychic, so the thread can be exactly the width, length or consistency that he needs – he can even make a parachute out of it. The thread then dissolves after an hour.

He then sews himself a costume, which has an extremely intricate and symmetrical web design on it and just to round things off he invents special white plastic eye pieces that he can see perfectly through.

comicbookreader

August 5, 2009 at 6:38 am

Other iconic moments to consider:

Gwen Stacy and Norman Osborn exchanging goblin juice:
http://www.spideykicksbutt.com/GreenwithEvil/DeFloweringGwen1.jpg

and

Norman’s O-Face while performing above-said action:
http://www.dailyraider.com/comics/sinspast/osborn.jpg

See, it all depends on your definition of “iconic”…

That Avengers panel is definitely my favorite, the best of the best.

Peace.

Well said, Bernard! You could also mention the odds of not stopping that particular burglar, only to have him then go straight off to kill your uncle, here in this city of eight million (or whatever it was in ’62).

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