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The Top 70 Most Iconic Panels in Marvel History – Day 14

Okay, in case you didn’t see the introduction, the concept is that each day up to and including the 24th of August, I’ll be posting three iconic panels from Marvel Comics’ 70-year history (panels meaning any single enclosed drawing, including single page splashes). On the 24th, you folks will get a chance to pick your Top 10 out of the 70 choices. I’ll tabulate the votes and I’ll debut the Top 70 Most Iconic Panels in Marvel Comics History on August 31st. In the meantime, feel free to e-mail me (cronb01@aol.com) with suggestions for panels for me to use!

Here’s the next three panels! And click here for the master list of all the panels posted so far!

Captain America #111…

Would you count this all as one panel? If not, I’ll just crop the top and have the bottom of the page be “the” panel, but it seems like the whole thing is intended by Steranko to be read as one panel…

Marvels #2…

Amazing Spider-Man #300….

Within, like, a month of this issue, EVERY Spider-Man artist was drawing Spider-Man just like McFarlane drew him on this splash page (thick webbing and all). It became THE look for Spider-Man for most of the 1990s.

28 Comments

What’s iconic about #3… the funky webbing? What’s next, iconic pouches?

Agreed on Marvels – I’ve always loved that shot – and Spidey. Say what you will about McFarlane now, but that single image changed how Spidey was drawn and thought of for years and years.

Regarding ASM 300, I’d say that story was also a fairly influential one for the period as it was the first full Venom storyline (back when the character was still good if only due to the fact that he hadn’t been overexposed yet). The panel was a breath of fresh year because you hadn’t seen the original costume for such a long period of time.

Yeah, say what you will about McFarlane’s business dealings, Spawn, the 90’s “style over substance,” etc. I won’t dispute any of it. But damn I loved his Spidey and I still do.

Ah, Steranko. Your Captain America run was always my favorite.

Look at how Spidey’s posed in that panel, with his ankles level with his ears — it emphasizes that Spidey isn’t quite human, and as such, could certainly creep people out, whether Pete intends that or not. You didn’t see that before McFarlane, and as Our Lord Cronin points out, that’s the pretty much how he was drawn for the rest of the 90s, no matter who drew him. So yeah, I would have to say iconic, whether I actually like it or not.

Nice panel from Marvels, as well. Is that the only iconic thing Giant-Man has ever done? (Giant-Man, not Ant-Man, Yellowjacket, or Pym.)

Yes! Steranko Black Lantern Bucky!

#2 is great too. Love that Ross somehow made the crotch-shot look awe-inspiring instead of snicker-inducing. Would you count the recent Sinister Spider-Man cover (#2, I think) as an homage?

#3 – loved this book. The first (and possibly last time) Spidey beat Venom by outwitting him instead of a) relying on his Spider-friends or b) folding like a cheap suit. Don’t know if that image is so darn iconic, though. Wouldn’t you call the first Venom “smile” from #299 a more iconic panel?

Marvels.

Three great images. I was going to say it’s good to see some more modern panels (2,3) get featured…but then I realised how long ago these were drawn. Which scares the hell out of me!!

I believe that # 3 is the first panel after Spidey permanently rejected the black costume. and went back to the blue and red. So it was a bit of an end-of-an-era type ‘o thing.

Look at how Spidey’s posed in that panel, with his ankles level with his ears — it emphasizes that Spidey isn’t quite human, and as such, could certainly creep people out, whether Pete intends that or not. You didn’t see that before McFarlane

Whilst I agree that this is what makes this panel iconic (plus the detailed / thick webbing), I’ve always thought of it as being McFarlane resurrecting the Ditko style Spidey – angular and contorted, and making moves that no human could make..

Michael Golden was the one who came up with the ‘thick, clumpy’ webbing in a one panel pin-up shot of Spidey, and McFarlane noted it and used that idea when he took over ASM.
DFTBA.

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

August 15, 2009 at 12:08 pm

The first (and possibly last time) Spidey beat Venom by outwitting him instead of a) relying on his Spider-friends or b) folding like a cheap suit. Don’t know if that image is so darn iconic, though. Wouldn’t you call the first Venom “smile” from #299 a more iconic panel?

He also outwitted Venom in the second and final Venom arc that McFarlane pencilled — by manipulating the symbiote’s love/hate relationship with him and inviting it to bond with him…which caused it and Eddie enough psychic pain to KO them.*

And Ben Reilly, of course, actually beat Venom in a straight fight and even forcibly split him from the symbiote, a major “beat” in the storyline setting him up as the real true Spider-Man of the Marvel Universe.*

* Granted, he got the idea after talking to William Jefferson, a psychiatrist introduced as Doctor Octopus’s shrink in Fantastic Four v.1 #267 and Web of Spider-Man #4-5, so maybe that doesn’t count for your puposes.

** Marvel Entertainment, Inc. brand Real Trueness may expire without warning circa 1996.

So, is the last panel of Amazing 299 going to show up any time soon?

OK, Dr. Matt, your idea bears investigating, so I’ve just had a look at a handful of Ditko Spider-Man issues. Although I agree with you in the general sense — that McFarlane wanted to bring back a more angular, contorted Spider-Man — I believe that in the specific, McFarlane took it further than Ditko did. The pose in McFarlane panel shown here is next to impossible for a human being to achieve — Spidey’s shoulders are lower than his thighs. I took a quick thumb through the Ditko issues, and while I did see many amazingly dynamic panels, and Spidey standing or crawling at any number of odd angles, I don’t see anything I would consider anatomically impossible. If you have an example of something you think is impossible, I would be interested to see it (I’ve got the DVD-ROM from GITCorp, so I can check any issue). When I first read through all the issues on that DVD-ROM, I was specifically looking for the first instance of Spidey perched on something, with his knees above his head, and I don’t think it occurred until McFarlane.

(None of which implies any judgment on the relative quality of Ditko’s art vs. McFarlane’s…each belongs to its own era, I think.)

The Marvels panel was also kind of parodied where Giant-Man appears buck naked, same angle, when he is with the “Defenders”

marvels hands down.

#2. Even before the scene in Ultimates 2 where we got a sight of Hank’s 60 Foot naked arse, the pose from Marvels was re-used in Ultimates 1 #3, when Hank first donned the Giant-Man suit. What’s worth noting about that is that the original Marvels scene has Giant-Man looking straight ahead and focusing on his mission, while Ultimate Giant-Man is looking down at the pedestrians, flirting with some women. Another very quintessential difference between the Ultimates and their predecessors…

Marvels #2, IMHO

Spider-man when he was actually Spider-man.

Mcfarlane forever!

Got to mention Michelinie.

if you count it as one panel, that steranko might be my favorite that we’ve seen so far.

Sometimes it’s real hard to choose on these things…I like ‘em all, but I’d probably have to go with the McFarlane panel at #3.

@Brian Mac –

I totally agree – when I said I’d always thought of McFarlane resurrecting the Ditko Spidey, I didn’t mean it was just a reiteration – I saw it as bringing back that angular, dynamic, almost sinister (at times) depiction – but evolving it and making it his own.

I did look back at those early issues, and it’s interesting, but it seems as though that aspect of the Ditko depiction got toned down over time. The panel in Amazing Fantasy 15 where he confronts Uncle Ben’s killer (“Not half as surprised as you’re going to be”) is a good example – he really looks like a humanoid insect.

got to go with number one for it shows that Steinko was unique and seeing cap freaking ovt and remebering bucky was pure geinuse on steinkos part

Every time I see some classic moment referring to Bucky’s death, I get this horrible sick feeling when I remember that they brought him back. Whichever writer it was that brought him back needs to be banned from Marvel forever.
It is the most pointless major resurrection I can think of. It’s not as if anyone remembered a multitude of great Bucky stories from the past, or that his absence left Captain America as just a pale shadow of what the series once was. Bucky never had a clearly defined personality in the past. The only major significance he had was the effect his death had on the captain. His resurrection was just a stunt as far as I can see, done for the sole purpose of showing everyone that the writer had the skill and the guts to pull it off.
(And for those who feel that Bucky has been a fascinating character since his return, please note that any newly-created character could’ve been given the same personality and attributes without screwing up established history.)

Marvels wins it by a mile for me

amen hammerheart. next it will be “top 70 iconic panels w/ guys holding square-barreled ray-guns bigger than their hands.”

All three are great! Can’t pick one I prefer… Though nostalgia pushes me towards #1…

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