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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 231

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we look at what I believe is Dave Campbell’s favorite Suicide Squad scene!

Okay, this fellow Gort is an old Russian Super Soldier from World War II. He is pretty good at killing people. Anyhow, he gets roped into working with the Squad, as shown here (oh, also, for the sake of this conversation, lets presume that even though he is really strong and seemingly invulnerable, a laser could still bore through his skull and kill him)…

So once he’s on the mission, he’s decided he doesn’t want to play along – but Deadshot has a different stance on that issue…

It IS a very hardcore scene, so I can certainly see why Dave likes it so much. Definitely an amazing Deadshot moment.

Writers Kim Yale and John Ostrander, along with artist Geof Isherwood, did a great job here (it’s in Suicide Squad #54, by the way).

15 Comments

First Skurge’s death, now this.

Is it Dave Campbell week?

-D

Ha!

This one certainly is because of Dave, but I’m sure Dave has no monopoly on thinking the Skurge scene is awesome. ;)

You seem to have omitted the best part of the scene (the reveal a few pages later.)

The Crazed Spruce

August 20, 2009 at 9:40 am

I’m still waiting on my favourite Suicide Squad moment. (For the record, it’s when Slipknot called their bluff.)

Brian, I love that you continue to show Suicide Squad “Cool Moments”, but damn, everytime you do, it just ticks me off more that DC has STILL refused to collect any of the original run in TPB’s!!!!

I agree that this is a completely awesome moment. One of my favorite Deadshot scenes ever.

What a terrific series this was.

“Suicide Squad” was the best on-going of its era. Period.

Sadly, it came during an era when hot artists ruled at the expense of story. I wonder what would have happened if the field team had semi-matching uniforms with lots of useless straps, Deadshot carried a Big F***ing gun and Nightshade wore a costume consisting of a bra, thong and some spiky arm things? Part of me suspects that Greg Rucka would have just banged out issue #267 ….

The parallel world you describe is horrifying, yet all too probable.

cool scene for it shows that deadshot is totaly nuts for actully jumping out after the guy telling him do you open the chute or do i have your brains splattered . not to mention asking Amanda for permission to shoo him. proves why sucide squad is so cool and dc needs to reprint the stuff.

“Sadly, it came during an era when hot artists ruled at the expense of story. I wonder what would have happened if the field team had semi-matching uniforms with lots of useless straps, Deadshot carried a Big F***ing gun and Nightshade wore a costume consisting of a bra, thong and some spiky arm things? Part of me suspects that Greg Rucka would have just banged out issue #267 ….”

Not really. It came out on the late 80s, you are thinking the early 90s.

The reason why Suicide Squad failed? The artists! Geoff Isherwood, pictured here, is probably the best the title had, BY FAR, and, well, his work is decent but not particularly attractive or exciting. The others were much worse.

Comics ARE a visual medium after all. Suicide Squad contemporary JLI had artists like Kevin Maguire and Adam Hughes – and was a HUGE sales sucess. That’s not a coincidence.

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

@Pedro Bouca:

“Suicide Squad” ran from mid-’87 until mid-’92. Rob Liefeld drew mini-series in ’88. Todd McFarlane wrapped up his run on “Infinity, Inc.” in ’87. Erik Larsen left DC to take over for McFarlane on “Amazing Spider-Man” in ’91. Most of the guys who defined the “Image Style” were at DC during Ostrander’s run on the squad. DC could very easily decided to pair up-and-coming writer John Ostrander with an up-and-coming artist.

In some parallel universe, there are message board threads about how those crazy ’90s costumes ruined the early issues of the long-running “Suicide Squad”.

Frankly, those parallel people are probably righ, since I disagree with you about the art. Luke McDonnell was a very strong story-teller. His pencils were never pretty, but you always knew what was going on. I think that added a lot to the first 24 issues that would have made the title worse. The guys that followed were very hit-and-miss. Isherwood was a good story-teller, but his characters have pretty massive facial changes within the same page. John K. Snyder was better staying on model, but his work very cartoon-y on a title that could have used someone realistic.

However, I can never figure out who I would have rather seen draw issue 25-66. Maybe Tim Truman, or Stan Wooch, could have done it. Neither of those guys is exactly a star, so I doubt it would have prolonged the life of the title. As I said, the style of the times really did not suit what Ostrander was doing, which is what makes the Squad so amazing.

The writing overcame any deficiencies in the art–and like Dean said, “the style of the times really did not suit what Ostrander was doing”

So it worked, and it remains one of my all time favorites.

Dean, the Image boys were already working, yes, but the stereotypical uniforms with lots of useless pouchs and big guns from their series first appeared with Cable and would took a couple of years to spread, by the time Suicide Squad was already on its way out.

McDonnell’s art was REAL ugly – and that would put the book at a disadvantage (and it DID) even if he was a great storyteller. And he wasn’t. Look at the Captain Boomerang vs. the Jihad speedster (Jaculi? I don’t have the issue at hand ) on the SECOND issue. I thought that scene was very difficult to follow when I first read it (I was a kid then) and only could make head or tails of it because of Ostrander’s text.

I can say a bunch of names. Kyle Baker (doing Shadow at the time), Truman, even the guy who drew the Mark Shaw Manhunter series for Ostrander (sorry, forgot the name). All were better artists than the one we got. None of them was a superstar at the time, but neither Maguire or Hughes were when they did JLI. Now they are, while only a few souls remember McDonnell, Isherwood, Snyder and co.

Stephen, Ostrander, as I said above, more than overcame the shortcomings of his artists on that series. But if it made the series good, it didn’t make it a commercial sucess. With better artists, it could’ve been.

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

In or out of custome, Floyd Lawton/Deadshot exemplified coolness in this series.

Isherwood was the regular artist when I first began reading with issue #42 and I enjoyed his work a lot. Talking about art, Grant Miehm and Karl Kesel did a great job on #26 which truly merits a “cool moment” installment of its own.

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