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CSBG Archive

Top 70 Most Iconic Marvel Panels of All-Time: #10-1!

We asked you to vote and you came out in droves! It was a great turn-out! And now, we begin the Top 70 countdown, with ten panels revealed in installments all this week!

Here‘s #70-61! Here‘s #60-51! Here‘s 50-41! Here‘s 40-31! Here‘s 30-21! Here‘s 20-11!

Now here’s 10-1!

Enjoy!

10.

9.

8.

7.

6.

5.

4.

3.

2.

1.

That’s the list!

I hope you had fun these past few weeks!

123 Comments

#7, which I assume is the Spidey burglar panel, isn’t showing up.

Yeah, fully half of these were in my top ten too (the Spidey ones and Bullseye — I went for the origin FF moments), so overall I approve.

I’m kind of surprised that the Wolverine panel ranked so high. I guess it’s been singled out as the moment when he became notable as a badass to be reckoned with, but I don’t remember anything about the context.

But it’s Wolverine, so I’m not THAT surprised. He had to be here somewhere.

I don’t think the Cap one would rank so high a year or two from now, but it’s a good panel from a good story, so I’m not complaining.

#7 isn’t showing up for me, either. Wow, lots of Spidey here. He really is iconic, huh?

I don’t know why it didn’t ocur to me until a few days ago, but the panel from Amazing Fantasy in which he crushes the metal chimney is pretty iconic, as well. Almost every time his origin is retold they have a version of that picture.

wow i wasn’t expecting bullseye elektra to make it so high

The Wolverine panel was followed by the first major Wolverine solo sequence, in which he takes on (and stabs) a whole mess of people. The panel repesents Wolverine at his best- full of menace but with a touch of humor, down, but not out, and ready to kick ass.

It’s interesting that none of the top 5 panels are by Kirby or Ditko. I’m not judging (the top 3 were all in my list), just surprised.

Ok, can someone please explain why “jackpot” is the most iconic panel – other than “it got the most votes”?

Really, I’m not trying to be difficult, I really just don’t get why it’s so much more important than the other Spider-Man moments.

It’s never meant that much to me, but I’m not a huge Spider-Man fan (I do like him though).
Is it the whole Brand New Day thing?

Like I said, I’m just curious.

This was a fun if somewhat personally disappointing exercise. But it’s a good gauge to see what other people like.

Thx

Oh yeah: FANTASTIC FOUR FOREVER! – sorry, after this poll I just had to get that out of my system.

Fun to see the results! I consider #3 to be a bit of a cheat however. The cover to that issue is actually the iconic image, which I’ve seen parodied numerous times.

P.S. Mary Jane is rather full of herself, isn’t she?

Probably in the minority here, but I would have ranked the Gwen Stacey neck snap higher, maybe even first.

A major character dying due to the failure of a Super Hero. A moment that has haunted the character ever since. Yes, his first meeting with Mary Jane was iconic. but not a stunning moment.

Had a love interest of a super hero ever died prior to that issue?

Hmm…. well I think about 4 of my top votes made the top ten. Not too bad.

John Romita Sr. is maybe the most underrated artist of all time, so it’s good to see him getting lots of love here.

Actually what I find kind of funny about number 1 is that really it’s the only “happy” moment in the top 10 (one could make the argument that Phoenix’s appearance would be as well, but they just crashed a space shuttle and Jean kind of died so I’m saying it doesn’t count ).

As for why it’s iconic, it’s the appearance of arguably the most important supporting character in Spider-man. Plus that one appearance also defined the identity of the character for pretty much the next 30 years. If you were to do a survey asking for defining panels of most the other characters in the top 10 you’d get these moments, but you’d get a lot of others. For MJ this is her panel.

It’s never meant that much to me, but I’m not a huge Spider-Man fan (I do like him though).
Is it the whole Brand New Day thing?

No offense, but if you’re not a huge Spider-Man fan to begin with, given he’s the most iconic Marvel hero out there, then you’re not going to understand a lot of the choices in the top 70 Marvel Iconic Panels. It would be like saying you don’t hate Bugs Bunny or Mickey Mouse and then judging the results of a panel of top American cartoon character moments.

Personally I would have thought the Elektra death-stroke panel would be # 1, but still, that’s pretty good for Miller (and Janson).

Fun to see the results! I consider #3 to be a bit of a cheat however. The cover to that issue is actually the iconic image, which I’ve seen parodied numerous times.

This particular panels’ undergone a lot of homaging, as well– most notably, of course, in a little film called Spider-Man 2.

P.S. Mary Jane is rather full of herself, isn’t she?

Kerry, that’s always been my read on that panel.

Five of mine are up here. I’m most surprised about Bullseye/Elektra going so high. I’m happy to see the permanent (so far) death of Gwen Stacey at least rank higher than the JOKE of Steve Roger’s death which OBVIOUSLY was done and undone for the $$$.

Ironic to see Mary Jane *tiger* to come in number one. Maybe Joe Queseda sees now why the *One More Day* was so controversial among spider fans.

Brian, thanks for the fun month of iconic covers…I know that was a ton of work for you, and an occasional hassle when whiny babies just…well wanted to be whiny babies. I appreciate it and it was a ton of fun!

Til DC’s 75th! Make mine ma…aww nevermind. :)

I again say that the acute lack of the Hulk in these panels as a major fault, as well as lacking anything from “Kraven’s Last Hunt” and “Demon in a Bottle”.

Kerry, that’s always been my read on that panel.

You guys seem to point this out at a criticism or unintended consequence of the panel. But the fact that MJ is so full of herself is EXACTLY WHAT MAKES IT SO GREAT. She’s so obnoxiously cocksure and full of herself it’s awesome. It’s what made me love the character so much. I hate the modern neutured pseudo-Gwen Stacy she was made into in the mid-80s.

They said … my mother … was puny Banner.

You guys seem to point this out at a criticism or unintended consequence of the panel. But the fact that MJ is so full of herself is EXACTLY WHAT MAKES IT SO GREAT. She’s so obnoxiously cocksure and full of herself it’s awesome. It’s what made me love the character so much. I hate the modern neutured pseudo-Gwen Stacy she was made into in the mid-80s.

Also, there was a LOT of build-up to that panel in the issues before it.

No, the popularity of the “Jackpot” panel doesn’t have anything to do with Brand New Day. It might’ve had something to do with the Spider-Man movies. But it won because it encapsulates the youthful spirit and joie de vivre of Marvel in the swinging ’60s. It suggests how anything can happen in Marvel comics.

buttler – exactly.

#8 is a big “uh, no” and #1 and #7 should be switched.

Ironic to see Mary Jane *tiger* to come in number one. Maybe Joe Queseda sees now why the *One More Day* was so controversial among spider fans.

The revamped MJ Peter was married to is a decidedly different character than the original Lee/Romita MJ. If anything, I think the post-Brand New Day MJ is closer in spirit to this panel than the pre-Brand New Day MJ.

I’m not a fan of Brand New Day by the way, (apathetic really) just making an observation.

@Roman: I was thinking the same thing…
Much love to JR Sr.!

Glad to see Cap’s ‘death’ got a lot of votes, its always cool to see a few modern stories on these types of lists.

That was lots of fun even if some of my faves didn’t get as high as I’d have liked. Thanks for all the work put into it.

Is there ever going to be a 70 Iconic DC panels list?

Had a love interest of a super hero ever died prior to that issue?

I don’t think so, but it has happened so often since that it has lost a little of its importance. Not that it is Conways’ fault, but Gwen Stacey has become just the first of many female characters to meet tragic ends. It has become a total cliche.

Brian from Canada

September 4, 2009 at 2:20 pm

For me, the “Jackpot” panel is iconic because of two things:

1. This is the payoff for a long-running subplot where Peter tries to avoid dating Mary Jane — and then gets stuck with her, only to realize she’s gorgeous and fun.

2. Of nearly all of the panels in this set, THIS is one where you get the meaning without the story (or at least the impact).

Want more?

It’s re-produced more than any other Spidey moment in later years because it is the moment that stand out. It’s a great line. And it’s every fan boy’s dream — the nerd gets the gorgeous chick on a date.

It’s the one I love the most.

But I **STILL** think we should have a second run of 70 panels because there are soooooo many missing!

Larry Lance, Black Canary’s husband, preceded Gwen Stacy in death by a few years. Superman had various love interests die, although none of them really counted.

@ T

Well no offense taken, but it does seem a little condescending, though I may be reading too much into your comment.

I said I liked Spider-Man, he’s not my favorite my favorite Marvel character – Reed Richards is, shocking, I know.
But I don’t understand how that affects my ability to judge iconic panels. I never said I “hate” Spider-Man.
I know plenty about Spider-Man and most of the rest of the Marvel Universe, I’ve been reading Marvel comics on and off for 27 years (with a protracted hiatus in the 90′s). I just don’t get why Mj is more iconic than say the “lifting machinery one”. I wasn’t spoiling for a fight or anything, It’s all subjective

I understand almost all of the choices, eps. the ones that are 20 years or older. The only ones I don’t get at all are the Avengers/Ultron, Scarlet Witch and Ultimate Cap panels. This is certainly because I’ve never read them and I totally can cop to that.

I’m not a huge X-Men fan either (but I don’t “hate” them), but I get why the panels are here. I get why “jackpot” was included, I was just rather stumped at it being #1.

I’m just bothered that you equate me not loving “Marvels most iconic character” with hating him and being ignorant of the rest of Marvels history and what makes a panel iconic. I’m not a huge fan of Superman, but I manage to understand DC’s history and iconic moments pretty well (well enough to bore my wife at least).

BTW: Bugs Bunny by a mile! Never been a big Disney fan, that may have to change given the events of the last week.

But no offense taken, despite my long winded response.

Brian from Canada

September 4, 2009 at 2:23 pm

T —

Just my opinion, but I think a DC one would be too heavily slanted compared to Marvel’s. For one thing, the fan base at this point focuses on Batman more than any other (kinda like Spidey) but, for another more important reason: DC has effectively wiped out parts of its history, so that the key moments are going to be replicated time and time again as they need — check out Brian’s legend involving Two-Face! — but little else will.

@Brian from Canada

Thanks, that helps.

I said I liked Spider-Man, he’s not my favorite my favorite Marvel character – Reed Richards is, shocking, I know.

That came out harsher than I intended, upon rereading it. Apologies.

As with “A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments”, this has become part of my daily routine – thanks Brian.

I am somewhat surprised by all the comments about the “jackpot” panel – it is pretty clear that everybody knows it, so it is obviously pretty iconic.

And as Seth said:

“As for why it’s iconic, it’s the appearance of arguably the most important supporting character in Spider-man. Plus that one appearance also defined the identity of the character for pretty much the next 30 years. If you were to do a survey asking for defining panels of most the other characters in the top 10 you’d get these moments, but you’d get a lot of others. For MJ this is her panel.”

Mainly though I’m puzzled by the idea that the death of Gwen is more significant than the introduction of MJ. I generally don’t like Jeph Loeb, but I quite like Spider-man “Blue”, and even in what is a massive love letter to Gwen, I always felt like Gwen was an important relationship for Peter, but MJ was THE relationship.

Moreover, if you look back at the issues around ASM 42, there is a massive shift in the focus of the comic with a strong emphasis on the romance aspects with JR sr coming on board. The centrepiece of this is the introduction of MJ in that panel. This sparks the whole Gwen / MJ rivalry. Arguably without that introduction, Gwen’s character would not have developed so much, and she may have ended up more like Betty Brant or Liz Allen. Gwen comes across pretty badly in the last of the Ditko issues, and only really becomes a sympathetic character through the contrast with MJ. So potentially, without that panel, you wouldn’t have the Gwen death panel, or it certainly wouldn’t have had the impact it had….

@ T

Awww that’s alright. Peace and love and all that…

OK, I can see the case for the Spidey burglar panel being # 1, Aaron (it is arguably the birth of the most iconic Marvel character ever), but why wouldn’t # 8 belong on the list? The Death of Captain America was a huge story, with tons of media coverage. Indeed, I would argue it is the # 1 iconic mainstream comic moment of the 21st century. It certainly deserves to be in the Top 10 (and I would argue that even if I hadn’t just finished re-reading the Brubaker Captain America Omnibus this week).

Another reason why the MJ panel is number 1 – it is the only panel on the list that the Wedding Present quote in song (“Santa Ana Winds” off of ‘El Rey’).

Three hours later, I still can’t see panel #7. Though I guess that red “x” is indeed pretty darned iconic.

was hoping at least one panel from the dark phoeix in the top five. and glad to see the this man this monster though would have had it at number one.

Hank Pym’s first wife was also killed several years before Gwen, but it was in a flashback (she was executed by communists!) so it’s not quite the same thing.

I think the 2 “Hear me, X-Men — I am no longer the woman you once knew!” Phoenix panels might have split the vote a bit, Chad.

Good list. I lek the entire top 10 and I have read all of the books. Very fitting list.

Wow, I never would’ve guess that Bullseye-Elektra would be #2.
Also, I’m really dissapointed that “This Man, This Monster!” wasn’t top three.
I’m guessing the burglar didn’t make it higher because a lot of people didn’t want to load up on Spidey.
Anyways, fun list.

@LouReedRichards:

Ok, can someone please explain why “jackpot” is the most iconic panel – other than “it got the most votes”?

I was perfectly content to see that panel at #1. To me, this has been an interesting in clarifying in my mind what the “Marvel Style” is. I have really enjoyed looking at individual images and thinking about whether they are unique to Marvel and/or are strong symbols of a given method of comic book story-telling. I’d sat that is true of the “Face It, Tiger” panel in the following ways:
1. It is a major change in the personal life of Peter Parker. The key innovation of Stan Lee was the ability of his characters to change in their civilian identities. The arrival of MJ changed Peter’s life forever. Can you even imagine a new female character showing up Flash #25 and supplanting Iris West as Barry’s girlfriend? That was a massive difference between Marvel and everyone else during the Silver Age.
2. On a related note, Marvel had a distinctive approach to sexuality that is on display here. Mary Jane’s dialog is a mild double entendre, which is why the moment is so memorable. Mild double entendre and images of female characters dressing and undressing in “private” are also hallmarks of the Marvel Style. It is part of what gave it an “edge”. Again, try to imagine Lana Lang showing up at Clark Kent’s door suggesting that he was about to get lucky.
3. It looks like it came out of Marvel comic. Romita, Sr. never worked for another publisher to the best of my knowledge. The Marvel artists of that period drew in a similar style to one another. The Miller, Kane and Cockrum panels do not have that quality.

For those who can see it, what’s #7 supposed to be?

Still can’t believe the Fantastic Four joining hands in FF #1 was so low (#21) and that there’s so much Spider love here in the top ten. There wouldn’t be a Spider-Man without the FF! But I have to admit I love the MJ panel – and yeah, you have to know how long they had been teasing MJ off-panel and how apprehensive Peter was about how ugly she probably was to appreciate the impact of this panel.

Is there ever going to be a 70 Iconic DC panels list?

Possibly there will be a 75 iconic DC panels list for DC’s 75th anniversary. I’m already awaiting things like the poll to decide which panel should represent One Punch (the actual punch, or one of the next few panels with Blue Beetle’s reaction and BC/MM walking in, or a combination?)

I’m not surprised Elektra-Bullseye was so high: it’s one of the most visual striking panels on the list (as well as being an important Daredevil moment.)

For those who can see it, what’s #7 supposed to be?

A little image-fu reveals it’s Spiderman recognizing the burglar.

The problem is that the link has .JPG, while the image is stored under .jpg

Stupid case-sensitivity.

It’s obvious why Bullseye/Elektra scored so high. Look at it. Bullseye has a sweet, SWEET ass. I’m not gay, but that’s a downright Beyonce-caliber tush Bullseye’s rocking in that pic.

Remembering One More Day, the #1 most iconic panel is also the #1 most ironic panel.

It’s a cool image and all, but why did Elektra build the back of her costume to be so very, very, very much more puncture-resistant than the front? :D

It’s too bad that Cap’s death was completely ruined because it was after that awful mini-series Civil War. That AWFUL mini series Civil War was so bad I can’t read anything connected with it at all. Then you have the Mary Jane intro there and now that’s ruined because before, during, and after that AWFUL MINI-SERIES Civil War, they just lied to readers about what they planned to do with no intention of actually doing a decent story of a magical spider-man who revealed his identity to world and betrayed all his friends and is a jerk. Amazing Spider-man is almost as bad as that AWFUL MINI-SERIES CIVIL WAR THAT H AD NO PLOT AND WAS TOTALLY HORRENDOUS! Marvel seemed like less of a company after that mostrosity.

‘I quit’ is not an ending, folks.

Thanks again for sharing, T.

If it wasn’t on a Slurpee Cup, can it really be considered iconic?

Thanks Dean, yeah that all makes sense to me.

Like I said, I wasn’t disputing whether it should be included or even why it should be #1.
I was just hoping for some clarification from some of the people who voted for it.

I like Spider-Man just fine. It’s hard not to. It’s kinda like saying “I don’t like chocolate ice cream”, he’s so omni-present and ubiquitous that it would seem to almost be heresy to say you don’t like him.
He was certainly my introduction to the Marvel Universe – as I assume he was for almost anybody reading this. I obviously need to go back and read some more of the early Romita run. I read most of the Ditko stuff and some of the Romita stuff, but that was years ago. The other Spider-Man moments just stand out to me more.

Ok I didn’t mean that paragraph to sound so defensive.

I’ve never read “One More Day”. So that didn’t affect me picking the “Face it Tiger” panel as my #1.

I picked it because it’s memorable, and it had a great impact on my memories.

It signaled a new era in Spidey’s & Peter’s life.

When I saw the initial post about a vote for most iconic panels the first thing that popped into my head was that panel.

Maybe why I like it is tied into one of my favorite scenes from the Spider_Man movies is at the end of the second movie when MJ shows up at Peter’s apartment and as Spidey rushes off to save the day she calls him Tiger–it’s not a direct re-enactment of that panel, but you’ll never convince me it didn’t influence that scene in some way–even if it wasn’t a conscious thought.

For those reasons I consider it very iconic & deserving of top place.

I don’t think I was even alive for a couple of those spider man joints. Now I would love to see the top 10 panels of the 21st century..Death of Capt would def get #1 and I didn’t enjoy civil war either ..but fuckk it..shit made history

Interesting. Maybe a better definition of what was intended by “iconic” would have provided different results. I looked at it as not the most *significant* panels, or the best-drawn, or the coolest – but the panels that are best-remembered, and that seem to sum up something about the character the best.

Panels that have been referenced not just in other comics, but in other media (movies & TV) tend to be immediate contenders.

QUOTE: Can you even imagine a new female character showing up Flash #25 and supplanting Iris West as Barry’s girlfriend?

Well, no. Of course, Barry Allen was never in a FLASH 25 – it would’ve had to have been Jay or Wally.

Well, no. Of course, Barry Allen was never in a FLASH 25 – it would’ve had to have been Jay or Wally.

I stand corrected. The 25th issue of the Barry Allen Flash after the Showcase issues would’ve been Flash #129. However, my larger point stands that Gardner Fox was on a totally different wave length.

Another slight update on #10. Fuggadboudit! http://wp.me/pBLmC-3i

Thanks again for sharing, T.

Oh come on! Like you weren’t thinking it too.

Cap getting shot in there is lame, I can understand every other one. If we’re going for modern, though, I would have replaced Cap getting shot with “YOU THINK THIS LETTER ON MY HEAD STANDS FOR FRANCE?!”

“It’s obvious why Bullseye/Elektra scored so high. Look at it. Bullseye has a sweet, SWEET ass. I’m not gay, but that’s a downright Beyonce-caliber tush Bullseye’s rocking in that pic.”

Well, of course. Without that certain panel of Northstar, we had to have something to make up for it.

10 should be higher.
8 (especially since it’s being undone at this moment) wasn’t a big deal.
Who thought it was going to last?
Even some main steam media was aware it wasn’t a permanent thing.
Notice how the death of Jean Grey isn’t here?

I’m surprised by the Elektra panel coming in a close second.

gotta admit it, you hit the jackpot with the first one :)

KangarooOnTheLoose

September 5, 2009 at 5:19 am

Great list. Would’ve thought that Bullseye/Electra would be lower down, but still. It’s been a fun week!

Wow, a lot of Spider-Man panels made it through this top 10. Being a Spidey-fan, I’m really all smiles for this :)

Great list, Brian. I had 7 of the 10, mostly because I’m old. No problem with number one. But Wolverine in the sewer just blew me away as a kid. At the time, Logan (almost no one called him that back then) was practically a cult figure. Hard to believe, but he wasn’t appearing in 100 comics a month. Heck, he was barely appearing in X-Men. This panel began his emergence as a major character. Made us geeks worship him. Now, of course, I can’t stand him.

It also helps that it appeared in the midst of probably the greatest X-Men story ever told (certainly the greatest to that point). That saga kept building steam each issue. You couldn’t wait for a month to go by.

Bullseye was similar. That Miller arc kept getting better & better. The Elektra panel was shocking at the time.

No way that Cap panel would’ve made the top 10 if it wasn’t so recent and fresh in people’s minds. Give this same poll with exactly the same choices 5 years from now and it probably doesn’t even crack the top 25. I agree with most of the rest of them, but I’m not sure I’d put the MJ panel at #1. Personally I’d have gone with the #6 panel as #1. There has never been a panel that so perfectly shows everything you need to know about Peter’s character in one single shot.

@President Kang – the problem with the panel you mention is that, although it’s kind of funny (in a cheap, borderline racist kinda way), it isn’t iconic. It doesn’t embody the spirit of any kind of Captain America I (or most people) would recognise. I guess it’s an iconic moment for the Ultimate Cap, but then… who gives a f*** about that guy?

That said, what are the chances of it turning up in the Cap movie? Pretty high, probably :(

To add to what others have said regarding the “Jackpot” panel, I don’t even see it as a Spider-Man panel, but a MJ one.

To me, this was the first introduction of a love interest supporting character that actually had her own personality. And, by that I mean beyond how she reacted to the hero. At the time Lois Lane and Gwen Stacy’s personalities couldn’t be described without mentioning how they react to or influence Superman and Spider-Man. But, this panel hinted to me that MJ would be more than that.

Theno

Brian from Canada

September 5, 2009 at 8:40 am

Hey, Brian —

Given the occasional “split vote” ideas, how about a top 70 MOMENTS in Marvel history poll? That way we don’t have to compete between two death of Gwen Stacy options, or creation of the Fantastic Four. Just asking.

I’ve never read “One More Day”.

Stephen, you are a lucky, LUCKY man. I wish I could say the same.

At the time Lois Lane and Gwen Stacy’s personalities couldn’t be described without mentioning how they react to or influence Superman and Spider-Man.

I like the sentiment regarding MJ, but I am afraid you are wrong about Lois Lane. Her basic personality was there from very early on. The Fleisher Cartoons are widely available and show a curious, wise-cracking Lois. She even fires a machine gun in “Billion Dollar Limited”. You could argue that parts of her personality were de-emphasized during the Silver Age, but not that they had never existed.

Great list!

Surprised Phoenix beat out the Thing, and that Elektra beat out so many others. No surprise with no. 1, though.

Looking over the lists, I must say: John Byrne kicked ass on this thing. Second only to Kirby with six panels, and those from six different comics.

The only artist I’m kind of disappointed didn’t get represented was Bill Sienkiewicz. Figured one of his New Mutants panels would have shown up, as his whole run on that title was bending quite a few people’s brains.

Funny how Perez and Miller only got one panel each for their art, and in both cases it was just for breakdowns. (Of course, Miller’s one panel was a major one).

Thank you for a lot of fun with this list.

I’m surprised by the Elektra panel coming in a close second.

That took me a back a bit, too.

It is a powerful image and still shocking all these bloody years later. It seems like every hack comic book writer has bumped off a major character, or two, in the their attempt to imitate the effect Miller got here. None of them have come close.

The idea that having superheroic adventures were potentially lethal was neither a new idea, nor unique to Marvel. Denny O’Neil had bumped off Kathy Kane at DC three years earlier. The Death of Gwen Stacey was a more distinctively Marvel moment. Stan Lee seemed to be interested in random, cruel twists of fate. The Death of Electra was very different than that.

Frank Miller did more to erase the distinction between Marvel and DC than anyone this side of Marv Wolfman. Miller adapted his style less to his corporate pay-masters than anyone before him. That opened the floodgates to current generation of star writers who more often than not barely seem to bother.

Beautiful. Democracy in action! I couldn’t have picked a better ten myself, though I may have rearranged them a bit.

Kinda funny how Daredevil is best defined by a panel he’s not even in. “I’m magic!”

What’s it say about us that MJ got the top spot?

Good to see Thing squeek in. Such a good one

I still love that panel from Thor #390 when Captain America lifts Mjolnir.

Interesting point, Blulk (if that IS your real name)…

Actually the top three picks do not show the featured hero, at most they depict his abandoned costume.

The most iconic image of a Marvel hero is now officially Logan in the sewer.
Which means I guess that I am now officially old.

Although I did have him as my number four.

I absolutely agree with #1.

Magneto, last page from Byrne/Austin X-Men #111. Should have been in the discussion.

Just so I know… I’m now about half way through Spider-man: Blue and there’s a panel where MJ goes “you jsut hit the jackpot”… I checked back and it’s not the same one… Was it just copied from an old one or something?

Best #1 I could have hoped for! And neither Hank swats Jan or Ultimate Cap made the top 10. Wow, 5 Spider-man panels, huh? Couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy. And I’m touched that the birth of Phoenix made it higher than Jean’s death or Dark Phoenix did.

Anybody read Marvel Zombies Return: Spiderman? Fred van Lente references panel #3 ONLY WITH ZOMBIE SPIDERMAN

Thank you CSBG! for turning me onto FVL!

To Mortenzen— Spider-Man: Blue was a retelling of the first few Romita issues of Amazing Spider-Man, so the panel there was just a new version of the original shown here.

Thanks Mary for clarifying… I’ve just finished reading Superman for all seasons and wasn’t really thrilled. I thought I’d give Loeb and Sale another shot but that Spider-Man: Blue is not outstanding so far… Too bad, I liked their work on The Long Halloween…

Probably in the minority here, but I would have ranked the Gwen Stacey neck snap higher, maybe even first.

Me too.

I’m not sure why there’s such surprise about the Bullseye/Elektra shot being so high.

Notice that so many panels are from old comics.

Marvel has abused the “shock” moments so much in the past 20 years that they are immediately forgettable…because we know it won’t last. (Stacy was truly dead, Jean Grey was truly dead, and so was Elektra. That goober fanboys resurrected those characters in later years thankfully haven’t washed away our memories of those moments. Unlike today, where “death” is just another story. Has any Marvel characters not died and been brought back in the past 20 years…?)

And the Cap death shouldn’t be anywhere near the top ten. We already knew from the get-go that it was another “Death of Superman” story where the character drops out for a while, fans have to endure a bunch of tribute stories, then comes the copycat knock-offs, and then the original returns. It’s a tired storyline, dusted off when editors or writers run out of ideas. (And it totally screwed up the best Captain America run EVER.)

Number 8 doesn’t belong. It was a stupid idea that came out of the Gawd awful “Civil War”. No death panel should be included since no one stays dead.

Stacy was truly dead, Jean Grey was truly dead, and so was Elektra. That goober fanboys resurrected those characters in later years thankfully haven’t washed away our memories of those moments

Gwen Stacy still is dead isn’t she?

No, Gwen Stacy was not the first significant other to die in comics, not even in Marvel Comics. There were three others that paved the way for Gwen.

There was Lady Dorma, Sub-Mariner’s girlfriend. There was also Una, lady love of Captain Mar-Vell. Finally, there was a girl from the Iron Man comics, I don’t remember the name now, but she was Tony Stark’s love interest from around the time he got his own comics.

But I think Gwen was the first time a MAJOR supporting character from a MAJOR superhero died.

What I find interesting is how much the attitudes have changed. Back then, those deaths were considered a major step in the development of superhero comics. A sign of maturity, that Marvel wasn’t afraid of change, and that in Marvel comics, there was real danger and real pain. And that was considered a good thing, almost universally.

Now character deaths are usually considered “cheap shock value,” or even a sign of “woman-hating” (if the character is female. And that when the deaths aren’t seen as a gimmick.

Another interesting thing to note is that Quesada’s rationale for One More Day isn’t anything new. The idea that a superhero with a content love life was a less intense and less interesting superhero is decades-old.

[...] CBR has posted a gallery of the Top 70 Most Iconic Marvel Panels of All-Time. [...]

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Ummm…what about Buscema’s splash of Silver Surfer rising from the hand of Galactus?

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[...] Comic Book Resources kürt die Top 70 Marvel Panels aller Zeiten [...]

Just so I know… I’m now about half way through Spider-man: Blue and there’s a panel where MJ goes “you jsut hit the jackpot”… I checked back and it’s not the same one… Was it just copied from an old one or something?

If something good or iconic ever appears in a Jeph Loeb comic, always assume it was copied from a good writer. Also, don’t read Jeph Loeb comics. Close Spider-Man Blue and track down some Lee/Romita Spider-Man reprints.

nice tyler, you got a much bugger following on this than i thought, keep it up

oops link, nevermind

Yeah, T. that’s what I’m starting to figure out… Honestly, I was planning on getting Dardevil Yellow but after reading those last 2 stories I mentioned (Superman for all seasons and Spider-man: Blue) I think I’ll hold off and keep my money for something else.

Daredevil: Yellow is pretty much identical to Spider-Man: Blue. The hero spends 5-6 issues fawning over his dead girlfriend and the art is pretty.

I haven’t read Hulk: Grey yet, but if Bruce Banner has a dead girlfriend I think I can guess what it’s about…

[...] Top 10 most iconic Marvel Comics panels of all time at Comics Should Be Good. Fun. Lots of Spider-Man. [...]

Admittedly, a very nice final 10!!!! :D

[...] aber natürlich vor allem auch textimmanent. Allein das folgende Panel, Platz 5 auf einer Liste mit “The Top 70 Most Iconic Panels in Marvel History”, hat zu zahllosen Interpretationen [...]

What an amazing list you’ve put together. Great work !

What a wonderful list! I’ve read every one of those books, I think I probably HAVE all of them still too, either as originals or U.K. reprints. I cried when I realised Gwen had died, I felt the rush when M.J. arrived. I may havce re-arranged the list slightly, but I can’t argue with “JACKPOT” being No.1. Brilliant!!! :D

[...] that makes this specific panel stand out so many years later. A few years ago, readers of the great Comics Should Be Good blog even named it their favorite Marvel panel of all-time. And given the direction Marvel ultimately went with the character, who could argue? But I can’t [...]

Fantastic list. Very, very well done. It DOES seem like there should be a little more Fantastic Four on here. Kirby had some amazing shots. But (except for the Captain America one) it’s reeeaally hard to argue with this list. Very nice work. (Can’t believe you picked “jackpot” as number 1! Brilliant!)

Sorry. I just found this article and didn’t even realize it went up to 70. Again, amazing job. I thought the top ten was dang near perfect.

[...] Not to mention the fact that the lead-up contains the fight against the Hellfire Club where Wolverine is thought dead, only to turn up at the end of #132 vowing revenge, in a panel that you readers voted the #4 Most Iconic Panel in Marvel Comics History! [...]

I agree with the comments about the lack of iconic moments in the past 20 years, especially where deaths are concerned. So looking outside “deaths,” one panel that could have merited inclusion – love it or hate it – is the reveal that Xorn was Magneto. That truly surprised tons of fans, and had both an immediate and long-term impact on the Marvel universe. And it’s in 616 continuity. ;)

I love the “snap” panel of “The Death of Gwen Stacy”, but I think that the ones that shows us how Spidey was really suffering are those that show Spidey “talking” to Gwen when he realize that she’s dead. The “NO! Oh, no, no, no — Don’t be dead Gwen — I don’t want you to be dead!” is really heartbreaking.

Oh, there was only one panel missing: the last one of “The Man Without Fear”, by Miller and Romita Jr. Daredevil’s uniform changing and Matt’s thoughts “The costume is probably a good idea. I sewed it myself. – God only knows what it looks like.” are priceless.

[...] that makes this specific panel stand out so many years later. A few years ago, readers of the great Comics Should Be Good blog even named it their favorite Marvel panel of all-time. And given the direction Marvel ultimately went with the character, who could argue? But I can’t [...]

Does anyone know where panel #6 comes from?

That Thing panel(and cover) from FF, (right in the middle of classic Kirby FF) brought goosebumps to my young eyes when I first saw it.
It still captures everything that was brilliant about Kirby.. The use of captions was also exemplary.

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