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Flippin’ through Previews – October 2009

Ah, the anticipation of new comics is often sweeter than the reality of new comics, ain’t it? With that in mind, it’s time to check out Previews #253, which asks us to believe that we need a second JSA book!

You remember when the X-Men started to go downhill?  When they added a second book.  Why don't companies learn???

See?

Dark Horse:

Ugly Cover Alert! Page 22 gives us this:

The poses are weird, probably because they're trying so hard to cover up the nipples.  Oh Sweet Jebus - NIPPLES!!!!

Usually, I’d be all for two nude ladies on a comic book cover, but Willow looks … really terrible. Oh well.

There’s an Empowered one-shot on page 26 (2 December). I imagine I’m a bad person because I just wasn’t impressed with the first volume and I haven’t been back since.

The final volume of Rex Mundi is offered on page 33 (3 February). I’m really hoping for a giant Omnibus or two.

The latest B.P.R.D. series comes to an end on page 36. I mention this only because I just heard that Dark Horse isn’t planning on doing for B.P.R.D. what they’ve done for Hellboy; that is, releasing them in those big ol’ “library editions” (the third volume of which just came out this past week). That’s unfortunate; I suppose I just have to go get the trades, as I’ve been holding off buying them until I could get the fancy library editions.

DC:

The cover for Green Lantern #49 (page 60; 23 December) shows John Stewart looking through a scope as he’s aiming a rifle. There was a cover in last month’s Previews on which he was looking through a scope as he’s aiming a rifle. What the hell?

Hey, look at the cover of Booster Gold #27 (page 66; 9 December):

To their credit, they didn't replace Booster with a scantily-clad babe, so that's something!

Classy!

I like the solicitation for Arkham Reborn #3 (page 76; 23 December): “[I]t’s starting to look like the new Arkham Asylum is one big joke.” Really? As opposed to the fine security at the old one?

So the DC Holiday Special 2009 is coming out on 9 December (page 83). B’wana Beast stars in it! Remember, 20 years ago, when a certain God of All Comics pointed out that maybe, just maybe, that’s a bit racist? But it’s so kitschy! Good job, DC, bringing the name back!

There’s a Steve Ditko Creeper hardcover on sale on page 91 (24 February). It’s 40 bucks, but I would assume it’s totally worth it. Of course, I like how it includes stories that were written by people who weren’t Ditko and drawn by people who weren’t Ditko. That’s rather weird.

DC is releasing the Doc Savage mini-series from 1987 in trade paperback (page 92; 13 January). It’s written by Denny O’Neil and drawn by the Kuberts (Adam and Andy, not Joe). Anyone want to chime in with a recommendation for this?

Vertigo has Daytripper #1 (page 107; 9 December) by Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon. Yeah, that’s going to kick much ass.

Stuff like this gives me hope for comics.

Hey, Peter Milligan’s Human Target gets a new trade on page 113 (13 January). It collects the original mini-series by the much-missed Edvin Biukovic and the graphic novel Final Cut by Javier Pulido. Is it worth it? For 15 bucks, you better believe it!

Jamie Delano writes a new John Constantine graphic novel, Pandemonium, on page 114 (10 February). Not only that, it’s drawn by Jock. So you know it will look awesome.

The third (and sadly, final) trade of Young Liars is out on page 116 (20 January). Pick it up and have your mind blown!

Image:

The latest “next issue project” is offered on page 143 (9 December). It’s Silver Streak Comics #24, and it features Erik Larsen and Paul Grist, among others.

Eeeeeeekkkk!  The Yellow Claw!

The second Elephantmen trade is offered on page 148 (16 December). Excellent stuff, and it’s 312 pages for 25 bucks. Not bad.

Speaking of second trades, the second trade of Phonogram is offered on page 149 (16 December). Considering three issues have yet to come out, I wouldn’t hold my breath. I get sad whenever another week passes and an issue of Phonogram doesn’t come out. Please tell me they’ll come out, Mr. Gillen! (Mr. Gillen reads the blog occasionally, and although I can probably call him Kieron, I don’t want to take the chance. He’d probably get McKelvie to beat me up.)

Speaking of tardy comics, Gødland #31 is offered on page 157 (16 December). I miss Gødland.

Marvel:

I won’t be buying Avengers: The Initiative #31 (page 4; 23 December), but that’s an awesome cover:

Chicks ... Taskmaster ... snakes ... piles of cash ... what's not to love?

Here’s the solicitation text for X-Men Noir: Mark of Cain #1 (page 14; 2 December):

“In the dark and steamy jungles of Madripoor, the flashing claws of Logan, the blazing bullets of Cyclops, and the dashing fists of the Angel met with wave after wave of beserk [sic] headhunters, all willing to protect the secrets of the Temple-Tomb of Cytorrak with their lives! The ancient treasure map of mercenary Cain Marko, with its siren-song of the priceless gigantic ruby of the fabled god-king, had lured them only into the icy claws of Death!”

Now, it’s written by Fred van Lente, so I’m sure it will be good, but that doesn’t really sound like noir, does it? And how nice that these stories sold so well they’re getting sequels.

So last month, in the solicitation for Dark Avengers #11, the text claimed, “[A]s the world gets turned upside down and no joke … someone dies. For reelz!! This month, for Dark Avengers #12 (16 December), they use the exact same text. I guess no one cares what’s in the actual book, as long as it’s, you know, kewl.

Okay, I don’t have much to say about the two Fall of the Hulks specials on page 34-35 (2 and 23 December), but the fact that there’s a “Hulk family” is, well, stupid. There. I said it.

Ugly Cover Alert! New Avengers Annual #3 (page 45; 2 December) is drawn by Mike Mayhew, who’s fairly decent, but his cover looks like this:

Can human beings even pose like that?

Blech. Really, blech.

So Bushman is back and is letting all of the crazy people out of some asylum in the latest issue of Vengeance of the Moon Knight (page 46; 16 December). If you want to convince us that Moon Knight isn’t a Batman rip-off, you probably shouldn’t steal ideas from a famous Batman story.

Ugly Cover Alert! What. The. Bleep. (Page 51, by the way.)

So ... much ... ugly!!!!!

Even though we all must love Warren Ellis, in the latest issue of Astonishing X-Men (page 57; 9 December), we learn that there’s an “attempt to remove mutantcy from the planet Earth entirely.” Sigh. Good plot, there. I realize it’s all in the execution, but still.

X-Factor #200 is offered on page 70 (16 December), and the team is back in New York (God forbid a Marvel book take place outside of New York or some fictional location; the X-Men bailed on San Francisco for a fictional location, and now X-Factor has skipped out on Detroit). It’s an odd solicitation – the issue is 104 pages, with the listing “new and reprint,” but there’s no mention of what’s reprinted. Usually Marvel makes a big deal about what they’re reprinting, so I wonder what’s going to be in this one.

Ed Hannigan: Covered is a cool project (page 80; 2 December). It features some of Hannigan’s Marvel covers from the 1970s and ’80s, and proceeds go directly to Hannigan himself, as he multiple sclerosis. What’s interesting, though, is that there will be only one printing of this book EVER (as the text loudly proclaims). I guess Marvel doesn’t want Hannigan getting too many proceeds through multiple printings, do they? Still, it’s a cool thing to do.

Marvel Masterworks: X-Men vol 8 (page 83; 10 March) is a keen collection: all the X-Men stuff from between the cancellation of the original series in 1970 to Giant-Size X-Men #1 in 1975. That’s kind of neat.

For 20 dollars, you can get the Mini Marvels Ultimate Collection trade paperback (page 100; 23 December). I don’t know if I can handle all the awesome that this collection will surely have.

Okay, it’s time to head into the back of the book. Fear not the lack of superheroes!

Jim Rugg draws Afrodisiac from AdHouse Books on page 188. I don’t know if this will be any good (it sounds like a parody/pastiche of 1970s blaxploitation movies, so I’ll probably skip it), but Rugg is a damned fine artist, so it will look good.

As you recall, I’m not a big fan of Eric Powell’s writing (although I love his art). But many people are, so check out Chimichanga #1 on page 188 from Albatross Exploding Funny Books (which means it’s self-published), which is Powell’s new series. It’s the story of a bearded girl in a circus. Presumably, because it’s Powell, there will be gross jokes that I won’t find funny.

Sorry, Eric Powell fans - I doubt if I'll ever change my mind.

I would recommend getting the Secret History Omnibus on page 196 from Archaia, because it’s a very good series. I’m wondering, however, if Archaia is ever going to finish publishing the original issues. I’ve been waiting for the final two issues, and don’t want to spend $35 to get two new issues. It’s vexing. If you haven’t bought any of the individual issues, however, this is a very cool series, and the $35-price tag is for a 336-page comic, so it’s a fairly good value.

I’m kind of bothered by Avatar’s new layout in Previews. On page 205 they offer “Ignition City #5 Auxiliary” edition. I don’t know what the hell that’s supposed to be. But Ignition City #5, the “regular” edition, hasn’t come out yet. This can’t be replacing it, so when is it supposed to arrive? These are titles shipping in December, and it’s not on their list of books coming out in November. I loathe “convention” specials and “variant” crap – I just want to read the damned book! (That last rant wasn’t aimed directly at Avatar, as other companies do it too. Don’t worry about the exclusivity of the book, worry about people reading it!)

There’s a new printing of the Mysterymen Adventures trade for $20 on page 210 from Bob Burden Studios. I’ve never read anything by Burden. Tell me, good comics aficianados, should I purchase this?

I know it's really big, but I wanted to highlight the horrifying/funny cover better.

Com.X has the softcover version of Cla$$war volume 1 (a second volume of which will probably never appear). It’s actually not bad – the art quality goes down when Hairsine leaves and the fact that it’s incomplete is annoying, but it’s pretty good. That’s on page 227, right next to a strange offering: 45, in which one man interviews forty-five super-powered individuals because his unborn child might have the gene that makes one superhuman. That’s a decent idea, but here’s the twist: each page is drawn by a different artist, and according to the solicit, they have some good ones lined: Liam Sharp, Jock, Charlie Adlard, and Dan Brereton, to name a few. Interesting.

Garth Ennis has a new Battlefields series coming out on page 235 from Dynamite Entertainment. This time, we get a young Australian joining a bomber squadron that’s about to start runs over the Ruhr valley. It’s drawn by PJ Holden, who’s quite good. It’s always nice to see an Ennis war story, although it would be nice to see him do other wars than WWII. It’s called “Battlefields,” not “World War Two Battlefields”!

On page 239, Dynamite gives us Dreadstar: The Beginning, which collects the stuff from before the ongoing series began. Yes, it’s $30, but I can’t wait to get this, as I’ve never read them.

I doubt if I’ll get Death Valley #1 from Desperado (page 242), but it’s a Western, it’s written by Keith Champagne and drawn by Shawn Moll, so if you really dig Westerns, this might be something to check out.

Fantagraphics brings Ho Che Anderson’s King back into print on page 252. Is this as good as I’ve heard it is?

I probably won’t get Borgia (volume 3) from Heavy Metal on page 255, mainly because it’s volume 3 and it’s $15 for 56 pages, but it features artwork by Milo Manara, who’s tremendous. And he likes drawing naked women, which is never a bad thing.

IDW keeps bringing these old comics back into print, and I certainly appreciate it. On page 263 they have Winterworld by Chuck Dixon and Jorge Zaffino. I don’t know if it’s any good, but it sounds like the kind of action comic that Dixon knocks out of the park, and Zaffino is a fine artist. I’ll have to check it out.

Dixon and Zaffino did one of the few Punisher stories I have liked, so why wouldn't I get this?

You can also get a trade of The Life and Times of Savior 28 (page 267), J. M. DeMatteis’s deconstruction of a superhero who decides he wants to change the world by becoming a pacifist. It’s not perfect, but it’s pretty good.

Abby and the Crusader get married in Love and Capes #12 (page 269, Maerkle Press). I should get this series more. It’s quite charming.

Justin Gray and Lee Ferguson bring us Mr. Keen: Tracer of Lost Persons on page 270 from Moonstone. It’s the story of a woman who hires Mr. Keen to find a man who is “sheer evil.” Oh dear. It’s a good creative team, and I might have to give it a whirl.

The second volume of Chris Schweizer’s “Crogan” series, Crogan’s March, shows up on page 274 from Oni Press. The first of the series, Crogan’s Vengeance, was quite good, and now we get a story of a different member of the family in the French Foreign Legion, fighting bad guys and creatures that like to eat people! Man, that sucks.

I was amazed by how much I liked the first Crogan book - check it out!

Atomic Robo and the Shadow From Beyond Time gets a trade paperback on page 284 from Red 5 Comics. You shouldn’t wait for the trade on this awesome comic, but if you do, now’s your chance to pick it up!

Mercury by Hope Larson is offered on page 285 from Simon & Schuster. Hey! I already reviewed this!

On page 294 we find The Apocalypse Plan from Transfuzion Publishing. Writer Rafael Nieves imagines Heaven and Hell as corporations that track souls instead of sales. It could be a clever idea, and Dan Dougherty draws it, so it will look pretty good.

I’m sure you’re dying to get your Zan and Jayna T-shirts (page 330):

Seriously ... why would you buy these?

The question is: would wearing the Zan one and promising that you have a Jayna one for her repel a woman or attract her? The mind boggles! (Considering they’re brother and sister, perhaps it’s best not to think about it.)

This figure features “cast-off clothing.” Ewwwwwww (page 376).

If you're planning on buying this, please don't tell me.

Page 385. Blood Energy Potion. We’re in hell:

Words fail me.

Okay, maybe going too far into the back of the book isn’t that good of an idea. But you can still stop before you get to the truly creepy stuff! Grab that Previews and start digging! You know you want to. Who wouldn’t?

38 Comments

Damn, that’s a lot of goodness in one month, even without comics shipping the last week.

I seriously did not expect another issue of The Next Issue Project to ever be released. I’m not even sure I got the first issue. I should track that down.

That Avengers: The Initiative cover is awesome, and I will start buying that series now that most of the minis I read are over or ending soon.

The only thing that will get me to pick up Vengeance of the Moon Knight is the return of Stained Glass Scarlet.

Man, I must be the only person who preferred Travel Foreman’s work on Cla$$war to Trevor Hairsine’s. That book really does suffer from being incomplete. Hopefully, the movie version will offer a satisfactory conclusion.

45 looks pretty damn tempting.

And, of course, everyone should read Atomic Robo any way they can get it.

I dunno, if I saw a Zan shirt at Kohl’s for like ten bucks, I might go for it for the kitsch value.

I hate it when there’s a month when nothing good comes out, and the very next month, like above, I can’t possibly afford everything that looks good. Gotta get me Afrodisiac! Want the Creeper HC, probably can’t afford. Need that Human Target trade. Gonna wait for the collection on Daytripper.

Damn, that’s a lot of awful in one month. Greg, I gotta share just about every criticism you made in this one. Yikes.

Though, re: X-Factor… Detroit may become a fictional city, the way things are going.

I thought Detroit was fictional. Didn’t they invent it for Robocop?

Mike Mayhew is usually pretty good but he really seems to have channeled his inner Greg Horn for that cover. Ugh.

Mr. Burgas, you have a REALLY strange sense of what an ugly-looking cover is. Especially since you didn’t seem to find anything wrong with the Mysterymen cover. >_<

Yet Warren Ellis’ Astonishing X-Men has been, for all its delays and status quo irrelevance, the best X-Book on the stands since its debut. And the idea of an alien civilization trying to decontaminate the mutant race from the universe has been toyed with before, most notably with the Morrison run ( the Shi’Ar pulling out of Earth concerns entirely after Cassandra Nova in Charles Xavier’s body obliterated their empire ).

I like the MysteryMen, but I don’t think it’s Bob Burden’s best work. If you’ve never read anything by Burden, you definitely need to read some Flaming Carrot. It’s weird. In a good way.

Jim Rugg draws Afrodisiac from AdHouse Books on page 188. I don’t know if this will be any good (it sounds like a parody/pastiche of 1970s blaxploitation movies, so I’ll probably skip it), but Rugg is a damned fine artist, so it will look good.

Incidentally, Afrodisiac was a supporting character in Rugg’s Street Angel comic.

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

October 4, 2009 at 6:42 pm

That Buffy cover reminds me of a question I’ve always had about comics licensed from TV shows: given that the characters tend to be drawn to resemble the actors who played them, has anyone from such a show ever complained about seeing “themselves” depicted in a tasteless or questionable fashion? (The usual transfer of likeness rights in actors’ contracts would presumably take real legal action off the table, but public complaints could still produce controversy.)

This isn’t to say Alyson Hannigan or Buffy are necessarily someplace I’d expect this, givent he show’s attitudes and Hannigan’s willingness to work in stuff like the American Pie movies. Now, if it were Robia La Morte’s character Jenny Calendar being so depicted, as she became a born-again Christian in between seasons 2 and 3 of the show, I wonder what would happen….

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

October 4, 2009 at 6:44 pm

Also, Nitz, no: I’d say X-Factor is more consistently good than Ellis’s Astonishing. Ellis has superior technique in his scripts, but the material’s just not as good or as resonant, since he’s simply applying his usual routines to a different set of characters.

” This isn’t to say Alyson Hannigan or Buffy are necessarily someplace I’d expect this, givent he show’s attitudes and Hannigan’s willingness to work in stuff like the American Pie movies. Now, if it were Robia La Morte’s character Jenny Calendar being so depicted, as she became a born-again Christian in between seasons 2 and 3 of the show, I wonder what would happen…. ”

Also keep in mind the recent ” Tit for Tat ” breast cancer PSA, where Hannigan is at a slumber party with several other TV actresses and feels Emily Deschanel to check for a lump. And Hannigan’s character on How I Met Your Mother, who’s as randy as one can get in a strictly monogamous relationship ( the second occurence where she’s played her own skankily-dressed twin, though this case a Russian stripper lookalike instead of an Alt.-U vampire ). And, of course, Willow’s transformation into a very exoticized pagan sex goddess. If Hannigan reads Season Eight, I doubt she’d be bothered in the least by her likeness being drawn in a sapphic nude cover.

My objection has nothing to do with the cover, so much as the fact that it’s more of a reminder how utterly Willow’s character has been ruined by becoming an avatar for a very superficial, tawdry conception of Wicca.

” Also, Nitz, no: I’d say X-Factor is more consistently good than Ellis’s Astonishing. Ellis has superior technique in his scripts, but the material’s just not as good or as resonant, since he’s simply applying his usual routines to a different set of characters. ”

I forgot X-Factor as Bush’s critics forgot Poland. I release a D’oh to the world.

That said, Ellis going through the motions on the X-Men is still superior to what most superhero writers are doing, especially when Ellis’ work is either free of crossover master narratives , or openly contemptuous of it ( like in his Thunderbolts comic post Civil War ).

I never could figure out the racism in B’Wana Beast’s name. I’ve googled and searched and have never figured out how it’s racist…B’wana doesn’t seem to exist outside of the caracter’s name…am I missing something?

I’m gonna agree with Omar. Besides X-Factor, I’ll put X-Force, and New Mutants is heading there, above anything with “X-Men” in the title.

It’s always nice to see an Ennis war story, although it would be nice to see him do other wars than WWII. It’s called “Battlefields,” not “World War Two Battlefields”!

‘Do other wars’… just say what you mean Greg – we want him to do Nam!

I love all his war stuff, but I think I preferred it in the War Stories format than the Battlefields one – not just for format reasons but the quality was generally more even…. then again, ‘Dear Billy’ ranks p there with the best stuff he’s ever written, so maybe I’m talking crap.

funkygreenjerusalem

October 4, 2009 at 7:38 pm

T’was me.

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

October 4, 2009 at 7:52 pm

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bwana

“Bwana” is sort of like “sahib” in India: a word the natives were expected to call the guys in pith helmets.

Scavenger: “bwana” is a “respectful term of address” in parts of Africa, but I believe it’s usually associated with natives using it to address their white rulers. I could be wrong about that, but I always thought that’s why, when a black man took Mike Maxwell’s place, he wanted to change the name from something reminiscent of colonialism.

FGJ: I was thinking of his Spanish Civil War story in “War Stories,” which was very good. I wouldn’t mind if Ennis wrote a ‘Nam story, but I also wouldn’t mind him writing a story about, I don’t know, the British Afghan campaigns!

D’oh! Too quick for me, Omar!

funkygreenjerusalem

October 4, 2009 at 8:15 pm

FGJ: I was thinking of his Spanish Civil War story in “War Stories,” which was very good. I wouldn’t mind if Ennis wrote a ‘Nam story, but I also wouldn’t mind him writing a story about, I don’t know, the British Afghan campaigns!

A more contemporary one could be interesting as well.

Let’s face it, the guy could do nothing but write War Stories all day – as many a month as he wanted – and I’d be totally happy buying them all.
I love The Boys, but I’d say goodbye to it if it got us another war series from him!

You will like Burden. Read his stuff.

You will not like the O’Neil/Kubert(s) “Doc Savage” mini. Unless you like stuff that’s dull and uninspired and sucks the life out of the mythology.

(No Moon Knight gag needed.)

” ‘Do other wars’… just say what you mean Greg – we want him to do Nam! ”

He has done it, twice, and excellently, during Preacher. John Custer’s experiences in Vietnam show that he’s done more war stories than just the Deuce ( even if that’s his preferred territory ).

funkygreenjerusalem

October 4, 2009 at 8:58 pm

He has done it, twice, and excellently, during Preacher. John Custer’s experiences in Vietnam show that he’s done more war stories than just the Deuce ( even if that’s his preferred territory ).

He also did it again and much more dark in The Punisher: Born.

Both Preacher and Punisher were great, but I’d love a straight up Nam series by him, without it tying into anything else – because in Preacher it was about his dad, not the war, and in Punisher it was about Castle and how he was destined to be The Punisher well before his family were killed.

That said, WW2 sure does have a lot different angles you take with it.

I see no problem with the Buffy cover; then again, my Hannigan crush is well documented.

X-Men: Noir sounds more like generic pulp, with a twist of Howard, than noir.

Issue 5′s been done for almost a month, but unfortunately has been held up on the production side of things.

The Doc Savage mini wasn’t awful by any means, but it does suffer a bit from “Scrappy Doo” syndrome. The series opens with a flashback in which the original Doc is sucked through a time warp and disappears.

Fast forward 30′s years to the late 60′s and his pacifist son gets caught up in the pressures of being the son of Doc Savage, including getting constantly berated by Doc;’s group of hangers-on about how pathetic he is in comparison to his father. Doc Jr. dies, but not before his lover announces she’s pregnant.

Fast forward yet again to “modern day” (the late 80′s) and we get Doc’s grandson, Chip. He is, physically, much like his grandfather and begins adventuring with Doc’s now-well-over-the-hill gang of followers, who never disbanded in the 50 years since his disappearance. However, Chip also hates killing and weapons and abhorrs many of his grandfather’s adventures and techniques for fighting crime. I guess he’s supposed to imbody the “sensitive 80′s man” or something…

To make long story short, the original Doc does come back and he and his grandson have to thwart a villain together, arguing the whole way. I liked elements of O’Neil’s story, but his inclusion of Chip and his attempts at “updating” the concept to the 80′s don’t work quite as well. The regular series that followed the mini-series suffered a bit from the same problem until issue #7 when Mike Barr took over writing and his first accomplishment was writing Chip out of the series and going back to focus on the original Man Of Bronze.

Oh, and the early artwork from the Kubert brothers is aces too. I don’t know why DC didn’t do more to keep them around as exclusives…

Eric Powell’s Chimichanga looked like it would fit in the vein of Goon… until I noticed that the solicit says “all-ages”. Eric Powell all-ages? Really?

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

October 5, 2009 at 9:23 am

[I]in Punisher it was about Castle and how he was destined to be The Punisher well before his family were killed.

Interestingly, Ennis’s last arc on the Punisher MAX title turned this around and made his version of Castle a commentary on the war.

Hi Greg

Issue 5 has been held up at Image for the last four weeks due to a production bottleneck, which is frustrating. We still have hopes of actually getting all 3 out, and then going straight into the trade on the stated pre-Christmas deadline*. Yes, that does mean more than one a month. But it’s going to be a bit more of a crush than we hoped, if we pull it off.

KG

*Considering there’s so much extra content in the comics to the zines, we don’t feel the small distance is a problem.

KG and Jamie: This is why I can’t imagine being in your shoes, when you’ve finished something and it’s still not out. That has to be frustrating. There are few comics I anticipate more than Phonogram, so I’m dying that the next issue hasn’t shipped yet!

Greg. There must be some Radical hate going on since even Stevie Wonder would have caught the The Last Days of American Crime from Rick Remender in the latest issue. It was a staff pick, there is an interview on page 184 and a 5 pages devoted to it with full blown interior pages.

I normally don’t chime in with rants like this since I’m obviously biased but this book has gotten nothing but praise from people who have seen it so far. If you go to http://www.myspace.com/radicalpublishing, you can read the first 15 pages and make your own opinion.

Greg,

Trust me, you WILL want Jim Rugg’s “Afrodisiac” collection. Here’s why: http://worldofhurtonline.com/tag/jim-rugg/

Sorry, Gianluca! I did see the book, but Remender is usually hit and miss with me. I’ll have to check out the link; thanks for it. I did order the Hotwire collected edition!

Jay: I’ll still have to mull it over. That’s a neat link, though.

Sweet. Steve Pugh and myself greatly appreciate that. I’m obviously biased on Last Days so please excuse my rant. It is Radical biggest title to date and at 64 pages, it will be worth every bit of the $4.99 price tag. From reading the script and seeing the finished art pages, It is definitely a hit. I’ll of course send you a copy to give the final verdict. ;)

That Buffy cover reminds me of a question I’ve always had about comics licensed from TV shows: given that the characters tend to be drawn to resemble the actors who played them, has anyone from such a show ever complained about seeing “themselves” depicted in a tasteless or questionable fashion? (The usual transfer of likeness rights in actors’ contracts would presumably take real legal action off the table, but public complaints could still produce controversy.)

I don’t know that any actor has complained about how a character was written in a comic, but James Marsters was none too happy with how Ryan Sook depicted Spike in a one-shot Marsters co-wrote.

Kieron and Jamie, that all DJs issue (was that #4? anyway) was masterful, and easily one of my favorite comics of the year.

Mm, I’d have to say Ellis’ Astonishing X-Men has been the least inspired and least exciting core X-Men book (though it’s still better than most of the other X-books) on the shelves since it hit the stands. And I’m as surprised as anyone, ’cause we ARE supposed to love Ellis, and I generally do… but Carey and Fraction are both doing wonders.

FunkyGreenJerusalem

October 7, 2009 at 4:31 pm

http://forums.comicbookresources.com/showthread.php?t=289815

Beau Smith has no problem with B’wana Beasts name!

I know I’m joining in on this conversation way late, but I haven’t been a fan of Ellis’s Astonishing X-Men at all and feel that Carey, David, and Kyle & Yost’s X-books have all been much better. I was recently talking to a friend about Ellis’s opening arc, so I thought I’d reproduce it here for everyone’s enjoyment (SPOILERS FOLLOW):

Parts 1–3: I can’t really remember what happened because they came out so freaking long ago (although I remember part 3 being something like “Let’s fit as many weird sex jokes about Beast and Agent Brand as possible into one issue”)! And they had that overpriced “Ghost Boxes” miniseries between them and part 4. But I remember not being impressed.

Part 4 (a.k.a. “Horrible Foreshadowing”): Let’s mention Forge as many times as possible in unrelated circumstances . . . and then find out on the last page that (you guessed it!) the X-Men need to go find Forge!

Part 5: Let’s talk about how crazy Forge was! Maybe if we say it enough times, people’ll think he actually WAS and we’re not just making this up to fit our story idea! (Oh, and let’s kill a bunch of the weird, artificially mutated “new mutants” Forge has created—because we’re the X-Men, and we kill people. Even the one that Storm intentionally didn’t kill—we just won’t tell her! Oh, and why are we keeping X-Force a secret again?)

Part 6: Let’s kill even more artificial mutants, plus psycho Forge, in a big explosion! And even thought he was an X-Man for a while, none of us’ll really care about it . . .

Ugh.

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