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A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 320

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Let’s take a look at another neat moment from Grant Morrison’s run on Animal Man!

In Animal Man #16, we see an interesting contrast between Buddy (Animal Man) and his fellow teammates in Justice League Europe.

In this issue (drawn by Chas Truog), the Time Commander shows up, but he clearly is not your typical super-villain – Buddy can see that, but can his teammates?

Strong work by Morrison (and one of Truog’s better issues, too, art-wise).

“The” moment, I presume, would be the last page, with Metamorpho’s confusion mixed with the old woman’s horror.

31 Comments

Ouch…

Forgot this issue…

There was an awful lot of depressing stuff in Morrison’s Animal Man, wasn’t there?

Good, but depressing…

When I first read Morrison’s Animal Man as a teen I thought it was so brilliant. Now whenever I reread it I find it horribly self-indulgent and heavy-handed. I actually enjoy Truog’s storytelling more than Morrison’s writing these days, whereas when I first read it as a kid I had totally opposite opinion.

“Metamorpho, don’t hit him!”

“Screw that! You’re not the one who got trapped in a giant hour glass!”

Truog.

Whatever happened to him?

I miss his stuff.

Brian:

It’s CHAS Truog, not Chris, as far as I remember, isn’t it?

No, you’re right. I’ll fix it!

I loved Animal Man growing up, really opened me up to actually good comics instead of just buying whatever shit I saw. But back then I didn’t care about art at all. Now it’s painful to look at this stuff. Lord, it’s like silly putty.

Yeah, and this was one of his better issues.

i would also go with animal mans speech to the time commander that he is not really bad but should not be messing with certain things. proving animal man was the perfect work for grant

I loved these Animal Man stories, liked them even more than I did Morrison’s Doom Patrol, which I liked a lot. Some of these stories really brought home that violence doesn’t really solve anything, it just makes more problems.

Morrison’s Animal Man: Where bad guys had the right idea and the heroes turned out like jerks. All those poor people went back to losing their loved ones. I wish I had Starr’s power and that is Morrison’s point. To the League, Starr is a basket case, but Buddy understood.

Jean Cocteau could have directed this as a film. Highly surreal, humanistic material here.

loved Animal Man growing up, really opened me up to actually good comics instead of just buying whatever shit I saw. But back then I didn’t care about art at all. Now it’s painful to look at this stuff. Lord, it’s like silly putty.

I kind of agree with you, Truog’s stuff does resemble silly putty. But his actual storytelling I think is great. He really seems to know how to pace a story well.

Ah wait, I just realized….does Morrison work full script? If so I guess I can’t give Truog the credit for his storytelling….

The thing is, those people are all actually worse off than they were before the Time Commander’s actions. When a loved one dies, it hurts and we grieve, but eventually we move on. We come to terms with the loss and accept it. We still miss the one who’s gone (and I like the inclusion of the woman with the cat, because pets do count), but there’s no longer that all-consuming sense of loss.
Now all those people got to spend a few more minutes with their loved ones, who were alive and warm and responsive. And then, they were ripped away again, even more suddenly than the first time in most cases. This second loss could be even more painful than the first.

And, of course, the concept of bringing the dead back leads to the final Morrison issue when…
NO NO NO spoilers!

(But it WILL be a cool moment sometime soon, right , Brian?)

To me the coolest Animal Man moments were the Coyote issue, Buddy’s time travel/spirit journey (loved how he discovered that HE had been the ghost trying to warn himself), and the final reunion.

I don’t see what’s remarkable about Truog’s storytelling. In this scene, for example, the only layout that isn’t totally perfunctory is the one with the crumbling clock and that’s not all that impressive.

I suppose the concept is all right, but I do agree it’s heavy handed. I know that Morrison’s AM was always something different, but I don’t like how this basically suggests the other heroes are incompetent, violent idiots. Or is this Morrison’s little protest that he would rather AM wasn’t stuck in a series written by someone else.

man, i love truog’s art here…. ive been reading comics almost 20 years now (and im only 26… jesus im a nerd) and art like truog’s is the type where 8 or 9 years ago i would have hated on, and originally did whenever i re-read animal, but now i LOVE. the simple, classic, clean style…. i think its great personally, much better than the cross-hatched, rushed, jim-lee wanna be style art a lot of comics at that time were (and still are!)

I thought Truog was Morrison using a psuedonym. Did I imagine that?

“I thought Truog was Morrison using a pseudonym.”
People used to say the same thing about Frank Quitely. Is Morrison the only writer these rumors happen to?

“I suppose the concept is all right, but I do agree it’s heavy handed. I know that Morrison’s AM was always something different, but I don’t like how this basically suggests the other heroes are incompetent, violent idiots. Or is this Morrison’s little protest that he would rather AM wasn’t stuck in a series written by someone else.”

Neither, in my opinion. This scene contributes to the idea that Buddy Baker isn’t really the same “type” as other super heroes. He’d rather try to figure out what the deal is with the clearly mentally unstable guy in the costume, than knock him out cold and arrest him. It’s showing his discomfort at being thrust into his position as a superhero.

“man, i love truog’s art here…. ive been reading comics almost 20 years now (and im only 26… jesus im a nerd) and art like truog’s is the type where 8 or 9 years ago i would have hated on, and originally did whenever i re-read animal, but now i LOVE. the simple, classic, clean style…. i think its great personally, much better than the cross-hatched, rushed, jim-lee wanna be style art a lot of comics at that time were (and still are!)”

I think you’re making a false assumption about the taste of people who don’t like this art. My issues with it are actually mostly the same as my issues with the Image style. Too flat, poorly proportioned, and exaggerated in odd ways.

I suppose the concept is all right, but I do agree it’s heavy handed. I know that Morrison’s AM was always something different, but I don’t like how this basically suggests the other heroes are incompetent, violent idiots. Or is this Morrison’s little protest that he would rather AM wasn’t stuck in a series written by someone else.

Neither, in my opinion. This scene contributes to the idea that Buddy Baker isn’t really the same “type” as other super heroes. He’d rather try to figure out what the deal is with the clearly mentally unstable guy in the costume, than knock him out cold and arrest him. It’s showing his discomfort at being thrust into his position as a superhero.

I feel like you”re both kind of right, based on one’s perspective.

I enjoy Truog’s art similar to how I enjoy Kirby’s. With both artists I don’t like how the people and objects actually look, but I love how they pace the story, choose camera angles, choreograph the action and arrange the panels and figures on the page (sometimes a body is floating outside a panel border, sometimes there are little objects like clocks behind the panels, using the hourglass to separate two panels, little touches like that. Ideally I’d prefer the pages above to have the exact same layouts but with an artists better at rendering but I take what I can get.

@ secret i.d.: I’m not sure about Truog, but it happens with Quitely and Morrison because Quitely (IIRC) is admittedly a pseudonym, he almost always works with Morrison to the point where I know I’ve heard of something he did with someone else but I can’t remember what it was, and they usually do their best work together.

Someone mentioned the Coyote issue, and someone mentioned heavy-handed and self-indulgent. 2+2=4 in this case for me.

Coyote Gospel? heavy-handed and self-indulgent?

Um, well, now that you mention it, I guess I’d agree.
But I’d quickly point out how heavy-handed and self-indulgent Moore’s Watchmen, Gaiman’s Sandman, and Kirby’s New Gods were, to name a couple more off the top of my head.

@ Dalarsco: You must be thinking of Quitely’s Authority run with Millar (as like you, I can’t think of anything else he’s done outside work with Morrison, though I’m sure he’s done a lot of UK/European stuff I’ve never seen).

Frank Quitely = “Quite frankly.”
Jesus Christ, how thick am I? I honestly never thought of that until Dalarsco said it was a pseudonym.

I’m torn about the art. On one hand it’s really not very good at all, but on the other hand it’s refreshingly unsuperheroey in a way that really works well with Animal Man.

As for the story… It’s another decent one, but not one of the stand-outs of the run by a long shot

I agree with Ethan Shuster’s POV.

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