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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 331

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we look at Robin dealing with the possible death of an enemy…

In Robin #46, by writer Chuck Dixon and artists Cully Hamner and Sal Buscema, Robin teams up with Sheriff Shotgun Smith to corner a gang of street thugs. Robin captures two of them, but the third is a familiar face – Young El, a man (heck, a boy) who killed a boy at Robin’s school and got away with it.

The fates are not so kind to Young El tonight, and we see how Robin deals with it…

Man, Dixon really “got” Tim Drake, didn’t he?

The empathy of Tim was usually the best part about him.

Strong stuff (great art by an unlikely art team, too!).

13 Comments

The Crazed Spruce

November 28, 2009 at 12:27 am

I’ve heard of this moment, but never actually read it. Good to see it lives up to the hype.

Say, did you already do the scene with Jason Todd and the diplomat’s son? If you haven’t, that would make a hell of a contrast with this one, don’cha think?

Wow, I love Sal Buscema. You can see his stylized inks on Tims close ups.

Powerful moment. Ya can’t save everybody, Tim.

After this… we need a light moment. Any chance you could show the “fight” between Spider-Man and Paste Pot Pete from Spider-Man/Human Torch #1?

I’ve never read or even heard of this moment, but I think it’s very, very good.

I don’t know how it was handled in later issues, but I like how Tim’s attitude about his failure seems really pissed off, as opposed to the sobbing, self-loathing, “I couldn’t save him! God, forgive me, I couldn’t save him!”, shtick that one could imagine reading. His commentary on spouting empty words is kind of refreshing, at least to me.

Is there an in-story reason the eyes of Tim’s mask are yellow? I don’t remember seeing them ever being anything but white, but I wasn’t reading the Batbooks during this period.

that moment proved the even afterr el got a way with murder robin tried to help him survive instead of just sayng see you even though in the end robin efforts came up short proving that chuck really knew how to give tim the right voice

@rwe1138: More than likely, Tim’s using his night vision lenses. Though they usually appear as green.

Jesus, that’s incredible, I wish I’d never stopped reading Dixon’s Robin.

Yeah, I liked this, back when it was called Ken Kesey’s Sometimes A Great Notion.

Brian, I’m curious as to who else you think ‘gets’ Tim, and who doesn’t…

Yeah, this is dark, but like Dhole, I like Tim’s reaction. The way he handled it was great.

Brian, I’m curious as to who else you think ‘gets’ Tim, and who doesn’t…

Yeah, this is dark, but like Dhole, I like Tim’s reaction. The way he handled it was great.

Well, Dixon wrote the character for something like 100 issues, so he basically created Tim’s personality, which is mostly why he “gets” Tim the best – he’s the one who came up with the personality TO “get”!

Since Dixon, it’s been a pretty big mish-mosh. I guess Tomasi does a good job with Tim’s personality. Nicieza, perhaps? Peter David in Young Justice? I liked Morrison’s Tim, but his Tim was a lot different than Dixon’s Tim.

I’ll probably be shouted down for this, but I thought Geoff Johns “got” Tim as well. That whole bit from Teen Titans of “You lied to Starfire!” “I lie to Batman.” in particular.

I’ll probably be shouted down for this, but I thought Geoff Johns “got” Tim as well. That whole bit from Teen Titans of “You lied to Starfire!” “I lie to Batman.” in particular.

It really depends on what we mean by “get.” I was using it in the sense of a consistent characterization, in which case I think Titans was “off.” That said, I had no problem with it. It was an interesting enough characterization, but just not one that I found consistent with Tim’s previous history (although far closer than some of the people writing Tim’s own title! Willingham, for example).

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