web stats

CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 355

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

I’m beginning my Christmas/Winter Present to you folks this week, by featuring one reader requested cool moment this Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. There were so many e-mails (and most of them quite heartfelt requests) that I felt that randomly choosing three was the best way to go, so I used a random number generator to get the three choices.

Today, we get a moment requested by Kellen involving Storm fighting against Callisto, the leader of the Morlocks…

To set the scene of Uncanny X-Men #170 (by writer Chris Claremont, penciler Paul Smith and inker Bob Wiacek), the X-Men are in conflict with the underground mutant dwellers known as the Morlocks. The Morlocks are typically those mutants who are too freakish to survive on the surface. In any event, Callisto (the “Queen” of the Morlocks) has kidnapped Warren Worthington, the Angel, and intends to make him her husband.

Well, the X-Men show up and try to stop her, but in the ensuing battle, Storm is stricken by a deep illness thanks to the powers of the Morlock known as Plague. She is then tied up and the X-Men are forced to watch as the twisted wedding begins. Earlier, Plague also used her powers on Kitty Pryde, who is now deathly ill.

Things are looking bleak, but there is still one chance…

While “the” moment is surely Storm stabbing Callisto in the heart, that scene where she catches the knife is pretty damn cool.

Paul Smith – you are awesome!!!

33 Comments

This is the first time I’ve seen the moment via the original comic. I somehow don’t miss the lightsabers from the cartoon.

Beautifully plotted death scene. Say what you will about Claremont’s prose, with a good penciler he could work wonders, and he clearly knew how to restrain himself when the moment called for it.

Doesn’t that Paul Smith art looks gorgeous ?

Excellent choice. Ororo’s response to Kurt is the “moment” for me. This issue began Storm’s bad ass phase and solidified her role as leader of the X-Men for years to come.

oh, I love hardcore Storm.

I’d say this is a pretty weak choice compared to some of the others. Just didn’t have that “wow” or “HOLY SHIT!” moment to it like some others have. It didn’t really make me want to actually go out and read the comic, and that’s what I feel this column should do.

High Flier,

you need to view the scene in contecx of the time, now everyone is bad ass and but back then storm was the heart of the x-men, an earth mother type and seeing her take a life so readily (even if is is quickly written of with her knowledge of the healer) was a shock.

When they recreated this scene with marrow and had storm actually pull her heart out it did not work.

This is also 20 issues after we saw her getting morally ripped apart while trying to decide whether or not she should break her no-killing vow to slit Magneto’s throat, isn’t it? Credit where it’s due, she makes a huge sacrifice to deserve her role as leader here. Magneto was holding the world hostage and she sat over him with a knife, wondering if she could make herself do it. Two years and a lot of difficult decisions later, she doesn’t hesitate to kill Callisto, even being as disoriented and sick as she is because her team and Angel are in trouble. Big character moment, and one of (if I remember right) her first real bad-ass moments.

The moment for me is the look on Callisto’s face after Storm catches the knife.

i always liked the look of surprise on Nightcrawlers face when storm stabbed Calistoe and told him she had to do what needed to bone proving that there is more to storm then first thought.

You definitely have to see this in context of the times. This when The Punisher was still a Spidey villain, before his mini-series. Wolverine was the only guy really willing to kill. Up to this point, Storm was essentially “The Girl” of the X-Men. She was the stereotypical peaceful nurturer, despite her powers. At the time, heroes killing was rare female heroes killing was unheard of.

Wasn’t this fight so awesome in X3? I can’t believe they recreated this moment with such fidelity on the big screen!

No, not really. Realizing halfway through that fight what the filmmakers thought they were doing was one of the “What a Pile of Suck” watershed moments of X3 for me.

This is also 20 issues after we saw her getting morally ripped apart while trying to decide whether or not she should break her no-killing vow to slit Magneto’s throat, isn’t it? Credit where it’s due, she makes a huge sacrifice to deserve her role as leader here. Magneto was holding the world hostage and she sat over him with a knife, wondering if she could make herself do it. Two years and a lot of difficult decisions later, she doesn’t hesitate to kill Callisto, even being as disoriented and sick as she is because her team and Angel are in trouble.

Meanwhile for the past 20 years Batman is still too much of a wuss to step up and kill the Joker. Claremont was ballsier back than than DC is even today.

Wasn’t this fight so awesome in X3? I can’t believe they recreated this moment with such fidelity on the big screen!

No, not really. Realizing halfway through that fight what the filmmakers thought they were doing was one of the “What a Pile of Suck” watershed moments of X3 for me.

How does not including this fight make X3 a sucky movie? it could still be done in future installments. X3 seemed, to me, to be a combination of the Dark Phoenix saga and various storylines that have appeared in X-Men over the years involving “curing” the mutant gene. I didn’t really see it as an adaptation of this particular storyline despite the presence of the Morlocks.

Also, I really do feel like people exaggerate the suckitude of X3. While arguably not as good as X2, it wasn’t quite as bad as people make it out to be either. It’s actually more entertaining than X1 in my humble opinion. My initial joy at X1 was due to joy that they didn’t butcher the franchise and that it was mostly cast well. But once the novelty wears off and you rewatch it, it’s not that great.

I talked to Paul Smith at a convention last year about this scene and he mentioned that it always bothered him because on the 5th page, panel 2, Callisto’s right arm was supposed to be pointed up and bent back at the elbow (and was halfway inked that way as the outline can still be seen), but the powers that be didn’t like it, so they added her hand in front of her (which doesn’t make sense from the preceding panel). Just thought it was cool that they left the original outline of the arm in.

@T.

It is my opinion that the makers of X3 were attempting to hit the “Storm fights Callisto” event with the fight between Storm and Callisto at the end of X3. This moment, shown here. It’s an important moment in X-history, and sensible to want in a film. Unfortunately, there’s nothing behind it in the movie, and all X3′s Callisto has from the comics is the name Callisto. It’s just “We have Storm and Callisto! Let’s do the Storm and Callisto battle!”

And as to X3 thinking it hits the Dark Phoenix saga, it’s one of the saddest things about the film. Remember that moment when Scott’s love for Jean nearly talked Dark Phoenix back to herself before Charles Xavier sucker-mindblasted her? Yeah, instead, their love is strong enough that… uh… she pulled him into his component molecules within three minutes of their first meeting after her becoming Phoenix. What a triumph of the human spirit!

I always get thrown out of this scene by the artwork in the “I lead the X-Men!” panel– Storm’s yellow skin and cartoony snarl seem very different from the art in the rest of the sequence.

Thanks again Brian!

This is the first time I’ve ever seen this. I started getting X-Men regularly just a couple of issues later, and I’ve read nearly every one for the rest of the decade, and some here and there since then. And this right here is the only time I can remember seeing a description of Callisto’s mutant abilities. And despite this description, I’m still not sure what she can do.

That’s a really well choreographed street level fight scene. Does anyone even try to do those anymore (or maybe they never did)?

i love the panels where, after Storm stabs Calisto, Storm walks forward as C collapses. Great scene of Storm knowing what she’s done and how the outcome will be.

Also, love Colossus’s purple prose. Who uses ‘misbegotten’ in any sentance ever?
DFTBA

Callisto was such a freaky villain in these first appearances. She has never been as cool as this since artists lost their ability to draw ugly-looking female characters.

Hmm Callisto is holding the knife in her right hand during the fight, but when Storm stabs her, she drops the knife from her free left hand.

Mary-
Callisto has increased strength and reflexes, a minor healing ability and enhanced senses. She also has some huntin’ and fightin’ skillz. She’s kinda like Wolverine-lite with an even worse attitude.

Rob- i always assumed that when Storm stabbed her she dropped the knife when her right hand was over her head and it just fell to her left when she collapsed.

Which prolly would have been enough to get me a No-Prize back in the day.

Sgt Pepper: If you pay attention, you’ll notice that the big writers these days (Johns, Bendis, Millar) can’t write fight scenes, period. All we get is “and then they fight!” The storytelling of the fight scene is a dying art form.

“Sgt Pepper: If you pay attention, you’ll notice that the big writers these days (Johns, Bendis, Millar) can’t write fight scenes, period. All we get is “and then they fight!” The storytelling of the fight scene is a dying art form.”

From a WRITER stand-point there’s probably more effort put into the “storytelling of the fight scene,” then there ever has been before.

Historically, and specifically in “Marvel Style” produced comics, pretty much every aspect of fight choreography was decided by the artist. The writer would ACTUALLY write “and then they fight.”

There’s MUCH LESS “and then they fight” in current comic scripts then there has been in any time in the last 50 years. So by those standards, it’s a thriving and flourishing art-form.

But…

That doesn’t mean that fight scenes are better. Writers are not, generally, any better at understanding visual pacing and fight choreography than artists are – in general, I’d argue that they’re worse.

So I basically agree with you, but for different reasons. The move AWAY from “and then they fight” is really hurting the comic fight scene.

(Although Millar is spectacularly good at writing fight scenes, if nothing else. So you’re wrong there.)

Vincent Paul Bartilucci

December 24, 2009 at 8:22 am

I’ll be a Grinch and say that this is one of the moments that immediately comes to mind when I remember why I no longer read the X-Men.

Storm is in really, really bad shape. Kurt knows how to fence which, granted, ain’t exactly knife-fighting but it’s closer than anything we’ve seen Storm do up until this point. Yet Ororo risks Kitty’s life. Why? To prove she deserves to be leader? To spare Kurt having to take a life? to be a bad-ass? Why? It makes no freakin’ sense. The only reason Storm battled Callisto here is because Claremont liked Storm better than Kurt.

Don’t get me wrong. Clarement was a truly great writer … on his pet characters. But writing a team book is a juggling act and Claremont was a lousy juggler.

Hey, the Astrocity link points to this Uncanny X-Men issue? Just me or the site?

Should work now.

Thanks, just read it. One of my favourite Astro City stories

For me, the single moment that changes everything is page 4, panel 1.

Here, we see Storm’s bare feet touch the ground as she circles her opponent in a deadly dance, the chanting crowd merging together to become flame-like and primal.

This is the moment when Storm embraces her humanity, becoming one with a greater tribe after nearly ten years of stories with her doing everything she can to remain the untouchable goddess, secure in her self-deception, forever floating above others, invulnerable to emotional risk.

So much of Claremont’s run was dedicated to exploring what it truly meant to be human–accepting who we are, breaking down self-deception, allowing ourselves to be vulnerable, striving to experience all that we can. His talent, methods, and tastes certainly fluctuated, but the message was occasionally delivered beautifully.

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives