web stats

CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comic Book Moments – Day 362

Here is the latest cool comic book moment in our year-long look at one cool comic book moment a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

With the year almost over, we’re going to spend five days on finales of long-running comic books. Spoilers are most certainly ahead!

We continue with the last issue of Transmetropolitan.

In the last issue of Transmetropolitan, #60 (by Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson and Rodney Ramos), we see the situation Spider Jerusalem is living in in his home outside The City. After a long time trying to bring down the evil President that Spider refers to as “The Smiler,” Spider finally succumbs to the side-effects of the Information Pollen he ingested earlier in the series, which can cause a disease similar to Alzheimer’s. Once he is diagnosed, Spider steps up his efforts and finally brings down Smiler.

In #60, Spider’s editor and old friend Mitch drives out to Spider’s estate to visit him – he sees a man dealing with the progressive disease and, well, we see how Spider decides to deal with it all when he is left alone with all his loose ends tied up….

“One percent” has got to be “the” moment.

Classic stuff there by Ellis.

22 Comments

Yeah, that was a good series. A good ending.

BUT, I thought the “moment” was the “fuck you” drawing of Ellis doing what he does best.

Ellis is one of my favorite writers, but I’ve never been able to get into Transmet…mostly because I’ve had problems separating Spider from his Hunter S. Thompson roots. Hunter (in his prime) was cooler than Spider ever could be.

Transmetropolitan is my favorite comic of all time, and #60 is the best final issue I’ve ever read.

So are those magic Daisy Dukes an art mistake, or is it just part of the future setting?

I was shocked by the ending in that Ellis let Spider live. Up until that moment Ellis had killed just about everyone he had worked on, Lazarus Churchyard died, Stormwatch was pretty much decimated and Jenny Sparks died.

Not part of the moment but was it implied Yelena was pregnant by Spider?
-Neil

i would also go where spider after making it look like he is going to blow his brain out lights his smokes with the gun and smiles. proving that spider mind may be fading but he is still proving to be more then he seems.

I loved this series. Read it all in TBP in a little over a week (and am still paying off the credit card balance – but it was worth it).

Josh mentioined something about the “Magic Daisy Dukes” which sent me scurrying to re-read the above. In the first couple of frames, Shannon is wearing full-length jeans which are inexplicably rendered as cut-offs in the last few frames. Never noticed this before – strikes me as an art mistake as I can’t ascribe any esoteric meaning to such a thing (if I wanted my no-prize, I’d say that Shannon looks busy with something while sitting on the ground next to Spider, and was probably cutting them into cut-offs while Spider was jawing with Royce).

Very cool ending to a very cool series – although my favorite parts were not so much the uber plot of Spider taking on (and taking down) the President, but rather the snap shots of future cyber-punk culture that Warren dreamed up for this series. Everything from the cultural reserves to makers to nanobot communities. It also contains the second reference to “Nazi Sex Midgets” that I found in an Ellis series. That man has a scary imagination.

Good choice all around.

I had never noticed that her pants change from jeans to shorts like that.

The subtlety of the ‘Yelena is pregnant” bit as a nice moment from this issue also.

I’ve never read Transmetropolitan, or even known anything about it until now, but it’s great to see Darick Robertson’s art. I loved the stuff he did in New Warriors. I always felt he was by the best new artist in the 90s (unless he was around before then and I missed it), but I’ve never seen anything since the New Warriors. I was wondering what else he’d done.

As much as I love Transmet, that ending always puzzled me. Even if Spider isn’t going to die and actually can light his own cigarettes ( albeit through a bizarre, deceptively-shaped lighter pistol ), the info-pollen poisoning has still taken away a lot of his cognitive and motor functions. So instead of dying peacefully in the beauty of the mountain, he’s going to live a few more years with reduced capabilities in the mountain, presumably not doing anything except being one with nature…basically putting him back where he started the series, as a deranged hermit.

Is the message that Spider will eventually come back on his own terms, that his wrecked nervous system is somehow healing, or that he’s gotten exactly what he wanted at the beginning of the series with no growth or change over those 60 issues?

Damn you, Every time I remember a particular bit of Transmetropolitan I end up reading the whole thing over again!

@ Mary Warner:

Darick was around long before New Warriors. He started drawing in high school and he created my HS’s mascot in ~1985. He went on to draw/write ‘Space Beaver’ which isn’t nearly as naughty as it sounds. He then started drawing for DC including JLI/A around issue #50. He’s a SF Bay Area guy originally, tho’ i don’t know where he lives now.
DFTBA

I’m enjoying this week’s theme. I guess it’s too late to request the final scenes from Zot! #36?

Is the message that Spider will eventually come back on his own terms, that his wrecked nervous system is somehow healing, or that he’s gotten exactly what he wanted at the beginning of the series with no growth or change over those 60 issues?

The twirling of the lighter-gun gives me the read that he’s part of the 1% that’s fine and is gonna fuck off and enjoy his retirement.

i think he might still live in the bay area, im from SF and i remember like a year ago he was in my LCS with a drawing board pencilling what i believe was an issue of the boys

and re: the ending, when the book started spider has retreated and given up hope, but i think he finally was at peace with himself at the ending, something he wasnt at the start of the book, he didnt care about anyone or anything but now has a ‘family’ and people he cares about

“One percent” is definitely the moment. Spider knew that he was part of it and had matured enough during the series to finally enjoy himself a bit. I’m glad it ended like this for him.

Excellent art by Darick Robertson and Rodney Ramos, btw.

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

December 29, 2009 at 9:11 pm

I didn’t mind the sentimentality of Spider’s full recovery, but it also seems that with him retired another Beast or Smiler will come along almost immediately and there’s not necessarily another journalist with Spider-s chops to expose the bastard. The real antagonist seems to be the apathy an superficiality that lets those sorts gin power in the first place, and Spider never really finds a way to defeat that in a lasting manner.

I guess it’s too late to request the final scenes from Zot! #36?

You got your moment already! ;)

Lazarus Churchyard died

He did? I thought he couldn’t. When did that happen?

As far as Robertson’s work as of late, the last thing I remember him doing was an issue of 52. With Faust and Ralph. Great Artwork. Great Story. I still get in arguements with a friend over the 1% meaning.

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives