web stats

CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comics – Day 70

Here is the latest in our year-long look at one cool comic (whether it be a self-contained work, an ongoing comic or a run on a long-running title that featured multiple creative teams on it over the years) a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we take a look at Jack Kirby and Stan Lee’s Fantastic Four Annual #3, the wedding of Reed Richards and Sue Storm!

Enjoy!

While there had been superhero weddings before, never before had their been a wedding on the scale of Reed Richards and Susan Storm (Mr. Fantastic and Invisible Girl of the Fantastic Four), mostly because Marvel was one of the first companies to excessively stress the idea of a “shared universe,” so they were able to make their weddings a bigger deal.

So with the third annual of the Fantastic Four, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby got together to tell an epic tale of what happens when two of the most famous superheroes in the world get married.

They have SHIELD working as their security – and look, it’s Patsy Walker coming by to see the spectacle!

As you might expect, things do not go as planned, as Dr. Doom gathers the greatest villains of the Marvel Universe to stop the wedding.

Luckily for the FF, the greatest HEROES of the Marvel Universe are there to help stop the bad guys!

Ultimately, the Watcher decides to lend a hand…

Reed erases the bad guys’ memories (and reverts events back to the recent past), setting up the actual wedding (it was neat how Lee and Kirby were able to have a normal wedding while still getting all of the slugfests out of the way), with a little cameo from two chaps from New York City…

What a great ending to a major Silver Age milestone!

24 Comments

So was Doom just tryin’ to mess with his favorite sparring partners? It seems so uncharacteristic of the monarch of Latveria to stoop so low, unless he’s miffed at not getting invited.

I think the Watcher just didn’t want to admit he didn’t have a wedding present.

What year was this issue? It’d really be helpful for some of us less informed folks if dates were mentioned in some of these columns.

That’s a typo. It should be FF annual #3, #2 had Doom’s origin.

One of the first comic book extraganza’s I can recall reading. For some reason, annuals were hard to come by in the spinner rack era of my old neighborhood but this one I remember my Dad getting. I am sure the Colleta bashers will show up but I always liked the way Sue looked when he inked her or Madame Medusa.

My favorite Lee/Kirby cameo along with FF #10 where Doom blew up their ashtray in the bullpen offices. Stan’s cameo recreation of it was a highlight of the second FF movie. I love that Funny or Die video of him asking for the Academy to create an Oscar category for his cameo actors.

Does anyone else remember a remastered version of this issue put out in the late 90′s? Every seque to a different superhero was done by a different artist. It was kind of neat.

Ethan, to answer your question, it is from 1965.

As for Doom, he just saw it as a time to strike when they least expected it. Or there could be ulterior motives of jealousy….hmmmmm.

Yes, E Wilson, I have that issue. It even has a few pages done by Steve Ditko. It was by Fabian Nicieza and Stan with artists that also included Sal and John Buscema, John Romita Sr., Gene Colan, Marie Severin and Ron Frenz. The inkers included Tom Palmer, Joe Sinott, Terry Austin, Al Milgrom and Bill Reinhold. It was done back in 1996. I wonder if that is the last time Ditko worked for Marvel??

Without checking, I believe it was summer of 65, right?
I first read it seven or eight years later when it was reprinted in another FF annual. At the time I was a rather ignorant little Marvel newb who thought that Neal Adams was the greatest ever and that Kirby was over-rated. Reading this issue actually helped shape that opinion, much as I enjoyed it. One glitch always screamed out at me, and it’s part of what you show here. Look at Iron Man in the bottom panels of page 17. In the left panel, the side view, his eye slit looks huge, like a Little Orphan Annie eye. To the right, the next panel, see how his eyes slits aren’t even close to being the same size and shape. This irritated the heck out of my twelve-year-old self, and still sticks out. There were other little clunkers scattered through the story. Now, of course, I just blame anything like that on Colletta.

Hey, look at Doom’s close-up on the first page. It seems that Kirby never drew the mask’s rivets with any consistency. They slightly changed in position and numbers from panel to panel. Again, at the time I would have called him a hack, but now I know he was being his visionary self, predicting the Rorschach mask effect.
Yes, add the Watchmen to the list of Kirby Kreations!

The thing that I always found funny about this issue is that The Watcher takes Reed to his home specifically to find something to end the fight but then refuses to say what it is because he “is not permited to interfere”.

Might as well go all the way, you already helped with Galactus! :-)

Ah, the beginnings of the tradition of super-hero weddings as giant fights.
@Anonymous: I presume your first Silver Age Marvel was X-Men, right? I was the same. Kirby was really phoning it in on that book, whereas Neal Adams was doing some of his best work. It wasn’t until I read FF that I found out that when Kirby cared his work became so much better.

By the way, the bonus material on one of the FF DVD’s has Neal Adams & Barry Windsor Smith among others giving their tribute to Jack Kirby and his influence.

A great, fun issue. Some random observations:

1. Doom’s vengeance: Doom’s uncharacteristic plan was motivated by the injuries that he had sustained in F.F. #40, which, by the way, features the greatest Thing vs. Doom battle in history. It would certainly make a very cool moment (hint. hint.).

2. Kosmic Kirby: F.F. annual 3 functions as a neat demarcation point in F.F. history. F.F. 1 through 43 had been dominated by the Namor-Doom-Frightful Four axis. Issue 44, which came right after annual 3, witnessed the debut of the Inhumans, an event which inaugerated the cosmic period of FF history (the Inhumans in 43-48, Galactus in 48-50,the Negative Zone in 51, Prester John in 54, the Cosmic powered Doom in 57-60, Blastaar in 61-63, etc.). When people think of the classic FF, they are mostly thinking of the issues from 44 on.

3. Joe Sinnott: Sinnott comes in in issue 44, and his slick, precise inks help to transform Kirby’s art. No longer would the Kirby imagination machine be hindered by so-so inks. Now Kirby clould soar.

3.Fun: Annual 43 was just plain fun. This was Kirby and Lee in a playful, joyful mode. The cameos, the guest stars, the parade of villains: it is all too joyful for words.

4. Continuity:The introduction of Patsy Walker on page 3, panel 2 officially brought her into Marvel mainstream continuity, although it took Steve Englehart to to actually bring her in.

5. Note to Brian: You must do the Doctor Strange vs. Dormammu epic in Strange Tales 130-144. It might just be the best sustained story of the 60s, and it has brilliant art by Ditko.

Damn, the wedding guest on page 3 had a bad day. Not only was his mind being controlled by the Puppet Master, but it earned him a Karate Chop to the back of his neck for his trouble. And he didn’t even get the chance to get liquored up and make an ass of himself at the reception before getting dragged away. Remind me not to be rescued by Shield the next time I’m being mind-controlled at a super hero wedding.

And how about Iron Man calling the Mad Thinker “Long Hair”. Should of called him a no-good, tree-hugging filthy hippy Freebird to boot!

trajan12 said: A great, fun issue. Some random observations:

1. Doom’s vengeance: Doom’s uncharacteristic plan was motivated by the injuries that he had sustained in F.F. #40, which, by the way, features the greatest Thing vs. Doom battle in history. It would certainly make a very cool moment (hint. hint.).

(How do you quote here anyway??)

Brian paid tribute to quite a few Lee/Kirby stories in the FF last year and the Thing/Doom battle in FF #40 was one of them.

http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2009/08/26/a-year-of-cool-comic-book-moments-day-238/

I also paid tribute to it in the appreciatian thread in the forums.

http://forums.comicbookresources.com/showthread.php?t=311764&page=3

I think it still fuels a lot of hate between the two, no matter what Doom says to Ben in X-Factor #202 ;-)

I found this several years ago at a garage sale for less than a dollar. I was so excited until I got home and discovered it was just a reprint from the early ’70s. It was still worth getting, though.

The first appearance of Hellcat in the regular Marvel Universe! Yay! Who would’ve thought she’d turn out to be one of their most important characters? (Yes, I stand by that statement. Marvel Divas would’ve fallen apart without her holding the story together.)

It’s so sad that they were only able to include just one of the wedding crashers in the movie. But I was really glad that they at least included him.

One of the best FF stories, what a great cast of characters. Kirby and Colletta FFs are rare but I like the look of it.

this classic story showed that even Doom can not defeat the true love reed and sue share. not to mention how hilerious that Stan and Jack could not get into the wedding.

@Ed: IIRC, Tony was originally created because someone accused Stan’s creations of all being left wing, so he decided to create a super hero who was an industrial magnate and arms manufacturer.

I second the vote for FF #40, it i my all time favorite comic and really shows Stan and Jack at their best.

Once again, the Silver Age proves its endless awesome.

Omar Karindu, with the power of SUPER-hypocrisy!

March 12, 2010 at 7:31 am

ony was originally created because someone accused Stan’s creations of all being left wing, so he decided to create a super hero who was an industrial magnate and arms manufacturer.

I…uh…what? The FF were American Space Race heroes, Ant-Man did nothing but fight Communists, and pretty much every other Marvel hero had a dirty Commie villain within their first two issues. The Hulk’s origin story involves Dirty Commies, and that came out a year before Iron Man.)

No, I don’t buy that anecdote at all.

@ The Dude: “Might as well go all the way, you already helped with Galactus! ”

Well, no. This annual came out before issue #44. The Watcher helped Reed defeat Galactus in issue #50.
I think (not sure though) up to this point, FF Annual #3, The Watcher had only appeared once or twice and had yet to get so involved with his interfering yet.

Congrats on the occasion that promoted putting up a wedding story: your wedding!

[...] Should Be Good, Brian Cronin looks back at one of the charmingest moments in Marvel comics history: the marriage of the Fantastic Four’s Reed Richards and Sue Storm, by Stan Lee and Jack [...]

“I think the Watcher just didn’t want to admit he didn’t have a wedding present .”

Well, gosh, the Watcher DID lend Reed Richards a device that sent all the super villains back home so they could proceed with the wedding . Besides, the Watcher could have taken out his checkbook and paid for the wedding . He could have bought a punch bowl or a set of cookware the day before, and then he’d be good to go . However, where is the Watcher going to find a necktie big enough to fit him ?

“Does anyone else remember a remastered version of this issue put out in the late 90?s ? Every seque to a different superhero was done by a different artist . It was kind of neat .”

“Yes, E Wilson, I have that issue. It even has a few pages done by Steve Ditko. It was done back in 1996 .”

What’s the name of this version ? What would I look for on eBay, or ask for in “The Comics Buyer’s Guide” ? What would I wish for with my magic amulet ?

“Tony was originally created because someone accused Stan’s creations of all being left wing, so he decided to create a super hero who was an industrial magnate and arms manufacturer .”

I don’t see where Marvel’s heroes were “left wing” . If anybody in the Marvel universe during the 1960s had any political leanings, they were fanatical communist villains . The Marvel heroes were all apolitical . They might as well have been all — American patriots !

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives