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CSBG Archive

The Greatest Black Panther Stories Ever Told!

Every day in May we will reveal the greatest stories ever told starring a particular character or written/drawn by a particular creator (and throughout the month, you’ll get daily chances to vote for NEXT week’s lists). These lists are voted on by YOU, the reader!

Here is the list of characters/creators featured so far (along with the rules on how to vote).

Today’s list is the Greatest Black Panther Stories Ever Told!

Enjoy!

10. Jungle Action #19-22, 24 and Marvel Premiere #51-53 “Black Panther vs. The Klan”

This was Don McGregor’s follow-up to his classic “Panther’s Rage.” It was controversial enough that he had to make revisions and the series didn’t even manage to be finished – it eventually was wrapped up in another title, Marvel Premiere.

Billy Graham, Rich Buckler, Keith Pollard and Jerry Bingham supplied the art.

9. Black Panther Vol. 3 #16-20 “Killmonger’s Rage”

This was Christopher Priest’s return to the classic McGregor stories with his take on the Black Panther/Killmonger relationship.

Sal Velluto handled the artwork.

8. Black Panther Vol. 4 #1-6 “Who is the Black Panther?”

This was Reginald Hudlin’s first story arc on Black Panther, as he re-introduces the Black Panther into the Marvel Universe with a new take on Wakanda. This began a long run by Hudlin on the title. This was later adapted into an an animated series!

John Romita Jr. did the art.

7. Black Panther Vol. 3 #41-45 “Enemy of the State II”

This intricate storyline by Christopher Priest pitted T’Challa against Tony Stark, with Wolverine thrown into the mix. T’Challa and Stark are so evenly matched that it is nuts and Priest uses their equality to perfect effect.

Sal Velluto was the artist.

6. Black Panther Vol. 4 #39-41 “See Wakanda and Die”

Jason Aaron finishes out the latest Black Panther series with a gripping and bloody storyline where Wakanda fights off the Skrulls – it is about as realistic as a fight against green aliens can be, and it is interesting to see what lengths T’Challa will take to defend his land.

Jefte Palo did the artwork.

5. Black Panther Vol. 3 #6-12 “Enemy of the State”

In this story, Priest shows Black Panther react to the involvement of the United States government in actions against Wakanda. Panther conflicts with his former Avengers teammates, including a stunning revelation.

Joe Jusko, Mike Manley and MD Bright handled the artwork.

4. Black Panther Vol. 3 #26-29 “Sturm und Drang”

Perhaps Priest’s most intricate storyline, Sturm und Drang shows that T’Challa’s most immediate peers are not so much other superheroes, but rather other MONARCHS, guys like Dr. Doom, Namor and (at the time) Magneto.

However, in this arc, Priest mixed things up by having Panther’s strategies NOT work out the way he expected, which is rare for T’Challa.

Sal Velluto did the artwork.

3. Jungle Action #6-18 “Panther’s Rage”

Rich Buckler, Gil Kane and Billy Graham supplied the artwork for Don McGregor’s epic storyline that introduced a formidable foe for T’Challa – Eric Killmonger.

2. Fantastic Four #52-53 ” Introducing the Sensational Black Panther”

This is where it all began! Stan Lee and Jack Kirby give us the introduction of the Black Panther as well as his (then) arch-nemesis, Klaw!

This was right in the midst of Lee and Kirby’s perhaps most brilliant period in a legendary comic run.

1. Black Panther Vol. 3 #1-5 “The Client”

This is the beginning of Christopher Priest’s run, and it features soon-to-be-integral-to-the-title character, Everett K. Ross, an agent of the Office of the Chief of Protocol who works as sort of the POV to the craziness of Panther’s world, as while T’Challa is visiting the United States, Wakanda suffers a major coup (that has supernatural backing) and thus begins the complicated game of intrigue that would become standard for Priest’s run.

Mark Texeira and Vince Evans did the artwork.

That’s the list! I’m sure there is a lot of agreement and disagreement with the list out there! Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments section!

And please vote for the lists that are still up for grabs here!

49 Comments

Mike Loughlin

May 8, 2010 at 5:25 pm

Good list! I didn’t expect so many of the Priest stories to make it (my list was 80% Priest), so I’m happy. I’m surprised Enemy of the State II made it, only because it was Priest’s most confusing story (rewarding nonetheless). “The Client” made the Panther interesting, gave him an awesome supporting cast, and featured gorgeous artwork. I remember reading it and being blown away. I miss Everett Ross, a three-dimensional T’Challa, and the humor and heart of Priest’s Black Panther.

BOO!!!!!!!!!!!! i disagree!!!

i feel like some of these choices were on point, but i’m very disappointed that none of the Kirby solo stuff made it in. i wrote so much about my own choices for this when i sent them in that i think i’m gonna adapt that email and post my top 10 on my blog.

Brian Cronin

May 8, 2010 at 5:39 pm

I’d have used some of your bits, Nick, but your choices did not fare so well!

Nice list!

It’s awesome that Don McGregor has not been forgotten.

Man, that Sal Velluto artwork (assuming that’s him on the covers, which seems confirmed based on a visit to his website) is hard to look at. Everything that is wrong with comic book art encapsulated in one guy.

I don’t believe I’ve ever actually read a Black Panther storyline, but from the descriptions and other things I’ve read online, the Priest stuff looks like a good bet. Is his run collected in trade?

An interesting selection. A few random thoughts:

10: PANTHER VS THE KLAN: A solid pick.

9:KILLMONGER’S RAGE: some of Priest’s best work.

8: WHO IS THE BLACK PANTHER?: Hudlin’s excursion into masturbatory Mary-Suedom. A better choice would have been the the Roy Thomas-Frank Giacoia origin tale in Avengers #87.

7: Enemy of the State II: another solid pick

6:SEE WAKANDA AND DIE: Sadly contaminated by Hudlin’s run.

5: ENEMY OF THE STATE:More goodness from Priest.

4:STURM UND DRANG: Still more fine work from Priest.

3:PANTHER’S RAGE: Genuine greatness from Don McGregor. Why this has not been collected is beyond me. Come on, MARVEL, at least offer us an ESSENTIAL BLACK PANTHER.

2: F.F.: As Brian noted, a gem from Stan and Jack’s golden period.

1:THE CLIENT: Jim Priest, where are when we need you? these five issues alone outclass the entirety of Hudlin’s run.

Generally great list.

Gotta agree with trajan23. Priest’s run ruled . . . and the list doesn’t include stuff like the early Velluto issues, the Nightmare/Killpanther arc (including a crossover with the underutilized Priest-written Deadpool), and even the Kasper Cole storyline.

And what animated series? I thought that was in BET development hell.

Brian Cronin

May 8, 2010 at 7:04 pm

And what animated series? I thought that was in BET development hell.

It’s already aired in Australia!

Wish I’d remembered that Aaron wrote that BP arc when the FBCD half off back issue sale was on last weekend. Sounded interesting when he was plugging it in one of those creator interviews Marvel ran in the back of comics last year.

I wouldn’t have reached even half of the ten so I didn’t vote. But if I had, “The Client” would’ve been #1. (I particularly loved “The Devil’s Pants”)

I also very much enjoyed the first story I ever read that had the Black Panther in it, Steve Englehart’s Avengers #126, which had Cap about to quit and become Nomad, and introduced me to the idea of the Big Three Avengers. The Panther wins the day through intelligence. And you gotta love that cover! :D

Stealthwise: The Client is collected, I’m not sure about anything else though.

I haven’t read any of these. I’ve read very few Black Panther stories, actually. (So I guess it’s good that I didn’t vote.)
It sounds like Christopher Priest is the writer to look for. The only stuff I’ve read by him was under the name of Jim Owsley. (I only recently found out they were the same guy.) The Owsley stuff I’ve read ranges from good (Spider-Man vs Wolverine) to awful (The Falcon, or at least every issue after the first), so I really don’t know what to expect from him.
As for T’Challa’s peers being fellow monarchs such as Doom and Namor, Steve Englehart made a similar point back in Fantastic Four #311.

“The Client” and “Enemy Of The State” are collected, and that’s it. Not like Marvel’s made it easy to find those TPB’s, either.

‘An interesting selection. A few random thoughts:

10: PANTHER VS THE KLAN: A solid pick.

9:KILLMONGER’S RAGE: some of Priest’s best work.

8: WHO IS THE BLACK PANTHER?: Hudlin’s excursion into masturbatory Mary-Suedom. A better choice would have been the the Roy Thomas-Frank Giacoia origin tale in Avengers #87.

7: Enemy of the State II: another solid pick

6:SEE WAKANDA AND DIE: Sadly contaminated by Hudlin’s run.

5: ENEMY OF THE STATE:More goodness from Priest.

4:STURM UND DRANG: Still more fine work from Priest.

3:PANTHER’S RAGE: Genuine greatness from Don McGregor. Why this has not been collected is beyond me. Come on, MARVEL, at least offer us an ESSENTIAL BLACK PANTHER.

2: F.F.: As Brian noted, a gem from Stan and Jack’s golden period.

1:THE CLIENT: Jim Priest, where are when we need you? these five issues alone outclass the entirety of Hudlin’s run..’

I really don’t have a problem with the writer for number 8 or 6 (unlike some people). BTW – the comment for number 8 seems a little rude.

I have to say the most shocking thing about this list was after I looked at it I went to see which trades I could pick up to read these storylines. In the process I learned that Marvel has seriously neglected collecting Black Panther stories considering only 50% of this has been collected and none of the McGregor stuff is. As trajan23 points out can’t we get at least an Essential? And what’s with so much of Priest’s run being ignored as trades?

Mike Loughlin

May 9, 2010 at 4:41 am

Unfortunately, Priest’s run didn’t sell a ton. As good as our Golden Age of Reprints has been, many acclaimed low sellers (e.g. Warren Ellis’s Hellstorm, Steve Gerber’s Foolkiller, the bulk of John Ostrander’s Spectre) remain uncollected.

Just wait for a Black Panther movie to finally get made, then you’ll start seeing it all get collected.

I think Sturm Und Drang is my favorite Black Panther story personally. Priest made that book memorable. If he was still doing Panther, I would be reading it.

Great to see Jason Aaron’s phenomenal Black Panther arc made it on to the list. I thought it was a sure bet that they would give him the BP title after that, but Hudlin came back for a reprisal.

That being said, Doomwar sounds pretty good from what I’m hearing too.

I only submitted a partial list, and it was almost all McGregor, but at least 2 of my picks made it in. By the way, it’s not really specified, but I think it’s worth noting that the conclusion to the “Panther vs. the Klan” story featured in Marvel Premiere was not written by McGregor (I think the writer was Ed Hannigan, but I’m too lazy to double-check right now). That’s why I entered it as a separate story in my own list.
Anyway, I just have to grumble over “Panther’s Rage” not taking the no. 1 slot, and add my complaints to those above about it not being collected in some reasonably priced trade edition…

I’ve only read the FF and Priest stuff, but I loved all of it. Priest really got the character it seemed and did everything a writer should to make an interesting and constantly evolving comic book.

Just be pedantic and geek like, Everett Ross wasn’t introduced in The Client, but in Priest’s run on Kazar.

Glad to see Priest so well represented, he’s the one writer that stands out (for me anyway) as truly ‘getting’ the character. His storytelling style of often coming at situations from oblique angles (ie., the Ross P.O.V. stuff for one) really worked with the enigmatic, reserved, ruler of a country T’Challa. I’d recommend his whole run up until the Kasper Cole storyline where, IMO, it kind of goes off the rails a bit.

The definitive Priest work is, of course, Quantum & Woody drawn by the excellent M.D. Bright.

Just be pedantic and geek like, Everett Ross wasn’t introduced in The Client, but in Priest’s run on Kazar.

Thanks, fixed it!

FYI, just so everyone knows, Panther’s Rage is getting collected in July into one of those super expensive Marvel Masterwork’s hardcovers. it was on a retailer order list from Diamond that got leaked a couple months back. i guess that expensive stuff gets solicited early to retailers…

I Voted Greatest Black Panther Stories Ever Told Voting and why.

1. BP 01-06 (2005) – “Who is the Black Panther?” Love Reggie’s take on T’Challa and Wakanda. Doubly love the Animated series that was made based on these issues! I want to give a special shout out to Dean White’s coloring. This series got me reading comics again.

2. BP 10-13 (2006) – “Bad Mutha” Luke Cage, Blade, Brother Voodoo and Monica Rambeau aid Katrina victims and take out some old bloodsuckers while doing it!

3. BP 14-18 (2006) – “The Bride” The Wedding of the Century gets better every time I read it. Love the characterization of Storm’s American Grandprents!

4. BP Annual 1 (2008) – “Black to the Future” What did Wakanda do during the Atlantic Slave Trade? A History of Wakanda and a happy future for the T’Challa and Ororo family!

5. FF 52 (1965) – Introducing the Sensational Black Panther! Stan Lee was inspired with a sense of racial and cultural diversity that was unprecedented at the time and still notable over 40 years later. It should be noted that Stan “The Man” lent his talents to the most recent retelling of the Black Panther’s origin in the new animated series based on Reggie Hudlin’s run. I’m sure the producers would have been happy to make a small role just for the comic legend, but there was no need. He chose a role already written. The ignorant American General who wants to know how a bunch of “savages” can tell the United States they have a no-fly zone. He also goes apoplectic when informed that the great Captain America himself was bested by a Black Panther. I loved it! Thank you Mr. Stanley Martin Lieber.

6. BP 19 (2006) BP & Storm visit Latveria. I love the writing of Doom and the Newlyweds.
Scott Eaton is great but what really sets it above the standard art is the coloring. Dean white is much appreciated. You can compare the art in Doomwar to the pictures in BP 19 to see the difference the colorist makes.

7. BP 24 (2007) During Civil War, while everyone was cowering or fleeing before Iron Man, Storm was able to stand up to Stark and clearly refute his BS! Hudlin also had a hospital bed-ridden, and assumed unconscious, Clor utter the memorable line, “I am no MYTH!” T’Challa, meanwhile, is helping Cap’s anti-registration action and also testing the loyalty of Cap’s people.

8. BP 31-34 (2007) “Little Green Men” There are two things I like about this series. Issue 31 displays some of fears both T’Challa and Ororo have about their new relationship. Storm however is shown to be the stronger physically and less mentally compliant. She breaks Psycho-Man’s machines and frees the heroes.

I also liked that Reggie took an obscure story about Skrulls basing a society on Earth American criminals and flipped the script by having the resistance chose to base themselves on the Earth American Heroes Martin Luther King and Malcom X. Storm was the bomb in these issues evading capture and leading fighters. Ben Grimm and Johnny are great and T’Challa shows why you don’t want to get on his bad side after handily defeating a White Werewolf.

9.BP 39-41 (2008) Secret Invasion “See Wakanda and Die” Generally dug the art and the subdued coloring. The writing of the Skrull commanders POV was well done. What put it on the list for me was the treatment of the Panther God. Generally, comic book writing of “Gods” is uninspiring. They are just another buff geek. Truly Wakanda’s God provides subtle protection for its people.

10. BP 30 (2001) – Ross (Whom I Hated) Tells a US Senate intelligence committee that T’Challa doesn’t need the United States friendship. But he still humbles himself before American lawmakers. It’s Passive/Aggressive bullshit, but it’s the best I could stand from Priest Run. It was the point I would go to when trying to understand his run before I found his website and read where he was coming from. I’ve spoken about it in earlier post.

Nothing to really add here, other that I wish Priest was still writing comics. He did a whole lot of truly incredible work.

A few more random comments:

Priest: On the Greatest Punisher posting, someone observed that Garth Ennis, by virtue of his utter domination of the list (If memory serves, the only non-Ennis pick was the first Punisher mini-series), was the definitive Punisher writer. Although Priest is not quite so dominant vis-a-vis the Black Panther, his 6 out of 10 score clearly establishes him as the most important Black Panther writer (with Don McGregor’s 2 out of 10 score positioning him as the top runner-up).

MARVEL MASTERWORK BLACK PANTHER: Although I am glad to hear that McGregor’s work is being collected, the MASTERWORK line is, sadly, a bit pricey for many comic readers.Even more regrettably, publication in the MASTERWORKS line will delay the publication of an ESSENTIAL BLACK PANTHER.

Hudlin: I thought that my description of his BLACK PANTHER as an excursion into masturbatory Mary-Suedom was quite apt. I certainly have the impression that Hudlin writes his scripts with one hand (the other hand being occupied with other things). Of course, the sheer badness of Hudlin’s run does afford a measure of camp value.

Hudlin: I thought that my description of his BLACK PANTHER as an excursion into masturbatory Mary-Suedom was quite apt.

It wasn’t. Sorry. Most of Hudlin’s stuff and ESPECIALLY “Who is the Black Panther” was pretty tight – And his Black Panther often came off as kind of a dork – Both overly cocky and more ‘n a little xenophobic. Storm was added to the cast (on a narrative level) to allow the audience to deal with B.P. by constantly putting him in his place.

This tends to happen a lot. I get the feeling that most people who are criticizing Hudlin’s stuff either haven’t read it or are too busy looking for reasons to get angry. The rest of your post sounds well thought out. When you write about Hudlin you’re not actually SAYING anything, just channeling random, dirty sounding phrases into nonsense sentences devoid of value.

But, from the CBR boards, this is what most people do when they talk about Hudlin’s Black Panther. I musta missed the memo.

Y’know, it never would have occured to me to vote for non “Black Panther” features, but seein’ an issue of Fantastic Four up there makes me wish I woulda voted.

King Solomon’s Frog would have been my # 1. Me + ’70s Kirby = Love forever.

Avengers # 52 – Black Panther vs. Grim Reaper – was basically a solo Black Panther story, and one of my favorite Avengers stories period.

Avengers # 112 was pre Englehart really shifting into gears, but has probably my favorite Don Heck art of any comic I’ve ever read.

Marvel Team-Up # 20 “Dinosaurs over Broadway” is, in my heart, my favorite issue of the series. All Black Panther and Spider-man vs. Stegron and a bunch of dinosaurs running around New York stepping on cars.

And definitely the Gene Colan “Black Panther impersonated Daredevil” story from BP 91-92.

And, heck, the Captain America story from the last couple issues of Tales of Suspense/first couple issues of Captain America was really good, too.

MarkAndrew:

1.”you’re not actually saying anything, just channeling random, dirty sounding phrases into nonsense sentences devoid of value.”:Actually, I rather thought that I was being perfectly lucid. I am merely stating that Mister Hudlin’s BLACK PANTHER is a power fantasy of the lowest kind. You are, of course, free to find my statements lacking in value, but I see no evidence of incoherence on my part. At least, you seem to have understood my meaning sufficiently to have taken umbrage at it.

2.Aesthetics: Perhaps you feel that my objections are too ideational in character. If that is the case, then you have a legitimate complaint, as any artistic endeavor must be judged in terms of both its aesthetic merit and of its ideational content. Sadly, Mister Hudlin’s work is of very low artistic merit. A few noteworthy examples:

Satire:Mister Hudlin likes to leaven his work with a heavy dose of satire. As befits a scholar of 18th century literature, I am all for the skillful use of satire. Unfortunately, Mister Hudlin’s satire is sadly lacking in the elegance of, say, an Evelyn Waugh. Everything is far too explicitly stated, as though Mister Hudlin were afraid that a mildly retarded deaf twelve year old in the back row will not “get it”: Dondi Reese, outwardly racist US generals refering to spear throwing savages, the Vatican authorizing a new Crusade in Africa, etc.

Characterization: Most of Mister Hudlin’s characters are terribly one dimensional: the Vatican sponsored Black Knight is an idealistic fool;European enemies of the Wakandans are out and out racists (Cf. Mister Hudlin’s very off key take on Doctor Doom;African enemies are corrupt sellouts, etc.

Rhetoric: Perhaps the root cause of Mister Hudlin’s aesthetic faults can be found in the old adage, “Of our arguments with others, we make rhetoric. Of our arguments with ourselves, we make poetry.” In Mister Hudlin’s run, one has the distinct impression that all of his arguments are with things exterior to himself (E.g., neoconservatives, White racists, Black sellouts, etc.). By their very nature, such disputes are shrill and lacking in emotional depth. It is only when the internal debate is externalized (E.g.,the regicide Milton’s struggle with the concept of unlawful revolt in PARADISE LOST, Alan Moore’s battle with the full ramifications of anarchistic terrorism in V FOR VENDETTA) that true art emerges.

The only Black Panther stories I’ve read where the pretend Christopher Priest’s first two trades. I thought they were pretty awful so I stopped there.

’1 Actually, I rather thought that I was being perfectly lucid. I am merely stating that Mister Hudlin’s BLACK PANTHER is a power fantasy of the lowest kind. You are, of course, free to find my statements lacking in value, but I see no evidence of incoherence on my part. At least, you seem to have understood my meaning sufficiently to have taken umbrage at it.

2.Aesthetics: Perhaps you feel that my objections are too ideational in character. If that is the case, then you have a legitimate complaint, as any artistic endeavor must be judged in terms of both its aesthetic merit and of its ideational content. Sadly, Mister Hudlin’s work is of very low artistic merit. A few noteworthy examples:

Satire:Mister Hudlin likes to leaven his work with a heavy dose of satire. As befits a scholar of 18th century literature, I am all for the skillful use of satire. Unfortunately, Mister Hudlin’s satire is sadly lacking in the elegance of, say, an Evelyn Waugh. Everything is far too explicitly stated, as though Mister Hudlin were afraid that a mildly retarded deaf twelve year old in the back row will not “get it”: Dondi Reese, outwardly racist US generals refering to spear throwing savages, the Vatican authorizing a new Crusade in Africa, etc.

Characterization: Most of Mister Hudlin’s characters are terribly one dimensional: the Vatican sponsored Black Knight is an idealistic fool;European enemies of the Wakandans are out and out racists (Cf. Mister Hudlin’s very off key take on Doctor Doom;African enemies are corrupt sellouts, etc.

Rhetoric: Perhaps the root cause of Mister Hudlin’s aesthetic faults can be found in the old adage, “Of our arguments with others, we make rhetoric. Of our arguments with ourselves, we make poetry.” In Mister Hudlin’s run, one has the distinct impression that all of his arguments are with things exterior to himself (E.g., neoconservatives, White racists, Black sellouts, etc.). By their very nature, such disputes are shrill and lacking in emotional depth. It is only when the internal debate is externalized (E.g.,the regicide Milton’s struggle with the concept of unlawful revolt in PARADISE LOST, Alan Moore’s battle with the full ramifications of anarchistic terrorism in V FOR VENDETTA) that true art emerges.’
And you totally miss the point here with the above paragraph. BTW, I’m still waiting for an explanation of this comment:
‘I thought that my description of his BLACK PANTHER as an excursion into masturbatory Mary-Suedom was quite apt.’

david:

1. “BTW, I’m still waiting for an explanation of this comment: I thought that my description of his BLACK PANTHER as an excursion into masturbatory Mary-Suedom was quite apt.”: david (sic), the term Mary-Sue is used to describe a character who is blatantly serving as an idealized author avatar. The term originates in 1970s STAR TREK fanfiction circles, where many of the stories involved the insertion of a fictional surrogate for the tale’s author. As many of the writers of these kinds of stories were female, the idealized author avatar character was dubbed a Mary-Sue. Mary-Sues are,of course, not confined to the world of STAR TREK fanfiction. Notable examples include: Auel’s Ayla, Robert B. Parker’s Spenser (The Mary-Sueish apects of the Spenser series increase over time), and many of the late writings of Ernest Hemingway.

2. Hudlin and masturbatory Mary-Suedom: In describing Mister Hudlin’s BLACK PANTHER as an excursion into masturbatory Mary-Suedom, I am attempting to draw attention to the fact that the BLACK PANTHER serves a compensatory function for Mister Hudlin. His deficiencies (be they mental, physical, monetary, etc) are magically washed away in the world of the BLACK PANTHER.The adjective “masturbatory” provides a potent sexual metaphor for this act of compensation. Just as masturbation provides sexual satisfaction to lonely men,Mister Hudlin’s idealized BLACK PANTHER allows him a vicarious sense of triumph over all the problems in his own life.

3. “And you totally miss the point here with the above paragraph [refering to my invocation of the dichotomy between poetry and rhetoric]“: Would you be so kind as to explain the nature of the point that I have missed?

“Hudlin and masturbatory Mary-Suedom: In describing Mister Hudlin’s BLACK PANTHER as an excursion into masturbatory Mary-Suedom, I am attempting to draw attention to the fact that the BLACK PANTHER serves a compensatory function for Mister Hudlin. His deficiencies (be they mental, physical, monetary, etc) are magically washed away in the world of the BLACK PANTHER.The adjective “masturbatory” provides a potent sexual metaphor for this act of compensation. Just as masturbation provides sexual satisfaction to lonely men,Mister Hudlin’s idealized BLACK PANTHER allows him a vicarious sense of triumph over all the problems in his own life.”

Okay.

You’re wrong.

This is not a thing where “I find your comments lacking in insight.”

You’re improperly describing the work, or you haven’t read the work, or you were so busy looking for reasons to be angry that you didn’t pay attention to the work, or something. But you’re wrong. And you come off sounding VERY silly while doing so.

MarkAndrew:

1.”You’re wrong”: How am I wrong?

2. “You’re improperly describing the work”. Feel free to provide a “proper” description. Until then, I will rest satisfied with mine.

3. “or you haven’t read the work”: I have read it, every issue. I am a fan of the BLACK PANTHER.

4.”or you were so busy looking for reasons to be angry that you didn’t pay attention to the work”: Actually, Mister Hudlin’s work does not make me angry. As I stated in an earlier posting, I find its very badness enjoyable on a camp level. Reading it is rather like a comic book version of MST3K for me, except that I provide the witty rejoinders.

5.”And you come off sounding very silly while doing so”: Really? How so? Please feel free to provide a detailed critique

6. Michael Bay: I am afraid, MarkAndrew, that your comments on my criticisms of Mister Hudlin rather remind me of a debate that I once had on the merits of Michael Bay as a director. In response to my statement that Michael Bay is one of the worst directors in recent cinematic history, I was told that I was too critical, that I was too elitist, that I was looking for things to criticize, etc. Well, as with the films of Michael Bay, some things deserve to be criticized.

I haven’t read any of Hudlin’s BP work, but I’ve seen parts of the animated series that was screened in Australia and I was underwhelmed. I guess I liked the characterisation of BP in Priest’s run (I jumped on during the Sturm & Drang storyline and stayed until that awful Kasper Cole stuff).

From reading the comments, the animated series appears to follow the same outline as Hudlin’s scripts (they “animated” John Romita’s artwork in the series) and I did find it a bit one dimensional – I actaully laughed at the Vatican’s reasons for offering the services of its (I presume) new Black Knight. I understand the largest growing source of Catholics is Africa! Plus, I doubt the Vatican is involved in forceful conversion.

While I found the reimaginging of Klaw to be good and Shuri vs the Radioactive Man was a great sequence, it was a bit one note in the characterisation of the X-Men, and the climax was too perfunctory. That is, all these villains were bulit up (Juggernaut, Black Knight, Batroc) and they were defeated very easily. For example, Juggernaut gets taken out by gas from missles fired by Wakanda’s airforce (are you serious??). Batroc gets beaten by one of the Dorja Milage (spelling?)) one on one.

3 words: KING SOLOMON’S FROG!!!!

I’m excited to see Priest’s run dominate this list so well.

I think Marvel made a serious error in judgment with Hudlin’s take. It would be awesome to see Priest given another chance at the character.

[...] The Greatest Black Panther Stories Ever Told! (goodcomics.comicbookresources.com) [...]

okay so i did end up posting my submission to the voting for this as a two-part blog post. here’s part one – http://www.audioshocker.com/2010/05/17/the-top-9-best-black-panther-tales-pt-1 – that’s almost exactly what i sent Brian, which i guess is kind of… sad, considering that i wrote so much and barely any of my choices made the list!

okay the Jungle Action Masterworks is out in June and the retouching they did on the art looks AMAZING: http://www.collectededitions.com/marvel/mm/bp/bp_mm01.html i might have to buy this even though expensive collections like this are against my religion.

[...] As I mentioned last time, this list was originally a submission to The Greatest Black Panther Stories Ever Told contest on the Comics Should be Good! blog (see their top 10 choices for best BP stories). [...]

Priest owned every inch of this character,it felt like you where reading the epic story of a KIng instead of just some superhero comic.Priest’s panther will be the definitive version of the character for years to come.

I don’t think Hudlin’s work should rank so high, to be honest.

The Essential Black Panther Volume 1 is very well done. Collects Jungle Action (1972) 6-22, 24; Black Panther (1977) 1-10.

Finally!

I’m glad to see The Client at #1

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