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The Greatest John Constantine Stories Ever Told!

Every day in May we will reveal the greatest stories ever told starring a particular character or written/drawn by a particular creator (and throughout the month, you’ll get daily chances to vote for NEXT week’s lists). These lists are voted on by YOU, the reader!

Here is the list of characters/creators featured so far (along with the rules on how to vote).

Today’s list is the Greatest John Constantine Stories Ever Told!

Enjoy!

10. Hellblazer #27 “Hold Me”

In this one-off issue by Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean, Constantine celebrates the life of a dead friend while a spirit torments people while just wanting to have a little bit of human kindness. Caught up in the mess is a lesbian couple looking to have a kid and a little girl who lost her mother. A touching one-shot by Gaiman and McKean.

9. Hellblazer #23-24, 28-33 “Family Man”

The previous story came in the midst of Jamie Delano’s “Family Man” arc, where Constantine is on the prowl for a disgusting serial killer known as the Family Man. There are a bunch of different artists on this string of stories.

8. Books of Magic (mostly #2, of course)

Books of Magic was Neil Gaiman and John Bolton introducing a new character, a young boy named Tim Hunter, to the various magical characters in the DC Universe. It was really well done. Issue #2 of the four-book series spotlighted Constantine.

7. Hellblazer #47-50, 52–55, 59–61 “Bloodlines”

This collection, written by Ennis and drawn by Will Simpson and Steve Dillon (the start of his run on the title), established Kit Ryan as Constantine’s girlfriend – Kit was most likely the most prominent of all of John Constantine’s girlfriends during the series.

6. Hellbazer: All His Engines

Mike Carey and Leonardo Manco come together to give us a brilliant original graphic novel designed for new readers and old (when the Constantine film came out), featuring Constantine traveling to Los Angeles where he is blackmailed into assisting a demon who has the niece Constantine’s old friend, Chas, hostage. Manco’s moody artwork beautifully matches Carey’s stark tale of terror.

5. Hellblazer #11 “Newcastle: A Taste of Things To Come”

Jamie Delano and Richard Piers Rayner show us a major part of Constantine’s life – the point where he and a bunch of his friends first summoned a demon. Things did not go exactly according to the plan, and the incident haunted Constantine for years.

4. Hellblazer #78–83 “Rake at the Gates of Hell”

Ennis’ swan song on the title, Rake at the Gates of Hell, really worked as a culmination of everything that had happened in his run from Dangerous Habits on, and the crash course that Constantine put himself and his friends (and Kit, the then love of his life) through come to its inevitable ending here, particularly Constantine’s challenge against the First of the Fallen. Steve Dillon drew it.

3. Hellblazer #62–67 “Fear and Loathing”

This storyline, by the future Preacher creative team of Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, features the angel Gabriel, who is demonstrating that he can definitely hold a grudge for a long time. Plus, we see Constantine try to dissuade his niece from following in his footsteps. I think we all know how that turns out.

2. Swamp Thing #44-50 “Murder of Crows”

This storyline is often referred to as “American Gothic,” as well. In any event, it was the first major storyline for Constantine as he manipulates guides Swamp Thing to defeat the ultimate force of darkness in the battle between good and evil. Alan Moore wrote it, Stephen Bissette, John Totleben and a bunch of other artists (Rick Veitch, I believe) combine for this epic tale that cemented Constantine’s place in the DC Universe.

1. Hellblazer #41–46 “Dangerous Habits”

Garth Ennis and Will Simpson combine for what is most likely the most famous Constantine storyline ever – the tale of how Constantine, dying of lung cancer, managed to turn his death into the ultimate con. The film, Constantine, loosely adapted this storyline.

That’s the list! I’m sure there is a lot of agreement and disagreement with the list out there! Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments section!

And please vote for the lists that are still up for grabs here!

57 Comments

I’m just curious . . . did Dark Entries or Pandemonium get any support? I reviewed both, and those were the only Hellblazer stories that I can remember. But then again, I’m not really a Constantine fan.

Is Bloodlines out of print? I have all the other Ennis stories, but am not familiar with these issues…

Wow, I haven’t read anything on this list besides Books of Magic but it seems really depressing that there’s nothing after issue #83 considering it’s up to issue #287.

Is Bloodlines out of print? I have all the other Ennis stories, but am not familiar with these issues…

I believe it is out of print, which is really weird, considering how popular Ennis/Dillon are.

So what I’m getting from this is as a fan of Preacher and Hitman, I should probably start reading Ennis’ Hellblazer.

Matt Lazorwitz

May 30, 2010 at 4:24 pm

A lot of my favorites made this one. One note, though: Forty is not collected in Bloodlines. It is issue 63 and is collected in Fear and Loathing.

No HARD TIME? For shame. Even Alan Moore said it’s the best JC in ages.

Hmm, I would have thought “Hold Me” would rank higher.

I guess it’s too early for the Milligan stuff to rank as “Greatest”, but in a few years I imagine it will. It’s been pretty fantastic.

funkygreenjerusalem

May 30, 2010 at 5:54 pm

I believe it is out of print, which is really weird, considering how popular Ennis/Dillon are.

It’s not that old though – it was the last of the Ennis trades to be released.

i stopped reading hellblazer when ennis left, and i was hoping to use this list for some ideas on the best of 1995-present. so what i’m getting is that the all his engines graphic novel is the only great hellblazer story of the last 15 years?!?!? hmmm…

but even though i’m disappointed at the lack of recent stuff on the list, i’m also surprised that sandman #3 didn’t make it, the story where morpheus recovers his pouch of sand via john constantine’s ex. it was quite a good story.

but had i voted, my #1 pick, eligible or not, would have been alan moore’s twilight of the super-heroes proposal to DC, in which john constantine was basically the main character. the story hinged on a future constantine traveling back in time with rip hunter to inform the main dc heroes of their impending fall. to make sure he succeeds, the future constantine tricks and manipulates the present day constantine, which present constantine doesn’t take too kindly too. in the final twist, present constantine gets back at his future self by essentially screwing over his own life, which i thought was a fantastic commentary on the mentality of the character: he’d do anything to prevent someone getting the best of him. absolutely anything.

They totally remade Hellblazer #11 into an episode of Buffy, didn’t they? Holy shit, Giles is actually John Constantine.

In other news, I need to read more Hellblazer.

I suppose “Twilight of the Super-Heroes” didn’t count? I really enjoyed reading that
I even casted young and old Constantines… Ewan McGregor and Malcolm McDowell respectively
(Sad thing is? Far from the nerdiest thing I’ve ever done)

I would have voted for Twilight of the Superheroes for #1, but I couldn’t think of enough Constantine stories. It woulda been cool to see an unpublished story featured here (which reminds that I would have put Ellis’ censored issue somewhere in there too).

Every few years I read that Twilight Of The Superheroes write up and get so sad that it never came to pass. Even with only Moore’s proposal to read, you get such an epic sense of what could have been, the Constantine part especially.

Giles is John Constantine…..dude! that would be one hell of a revelation.

No Azz or Ellis? Fucked up.

“Dangerous Habits” introduces Kit Ryan, not “Bloodlines”.

“Hellblazer” has for the most part, been very good the last ten years or so, w/ the notable exceptions of the Azzarello and Mina eras. Warren Ellis, Mike Carey, Andy Diggle and Peter Milligan have all been doing very good work that has pushed the character forward, while paying tribute to what came before.

…and it’s weird that this recent work didn’t show up at all. Instead: Moore/Gaiman fetishism. Whoo.

funkygreenjerusalem

May 31, 2010 at 3:54 am

“Hellblazer” has for the most part, been very good the last ten years or so, w/ the notable exceptions of the Azzarello and Mina eras. Warren Ellis, Mike Carey, Andy Diggle and Peter Milligan have all been doing very good work that has pushed the character forward, while paying tribute to what came before.

Almost – Ellis, Azzarello, Milligan = good. All the others = mediocre.

This makes me want to read the Ennis run so badly.

One of my big beefs with Ennis’ run (and mostly the conclusion of it) is how he treated the supporting cast he created. Felt a lot like “I don’t want anyone else to play with my toys, so I’m taking them off the table”. Now, I can understand the impulse of a creator to not want to let someone else “mess up” characters they create, but when it’s a company-owned property you don’t get to make that call.

And I liked Ennis’ supporting characters a lot, and felt they had a lot of additional storytelling potential left.

Very fair point, Josh. I remember thinking that at the time, as well. Like, “I get why you don’t want others to play with your stuff, but it’s such cool stuff!”

brian-

just out of curiosity, did twilight of the super-heroes proposal get any support? would you have allowed it in the top ten if it had gotten enough votes?

I wish I hadn’t forgot to vote for this, because man is this list disappointing. I really like all of the entries here (except “Hold Me”, which I’ve always felt to be waaaay overrated), and I’m not surprised at all that “Dangerous Habits” is # 1. But seriously, no love for the other writers? In particular, no love for Paul Jenkins, who wrote what would have been my # 1 pick, “Critical Mass”? This list makes me a sad panda.

I can’t believe Warren Ellis’ run didn’t get a spot of love. No “Haunted”? Really?

Chris: We’ve got a lot of Ennis fans on the board. I can see Ennis dominating the Punisher stories (what else was there, after all), but for him to dominate this list too when Constantine has been handled by other just-as-big writers makes me inclined to think that we’re a little Ennis-biased on the whole.

Not that I’m complaining, mind you.

Chris: We’ve got a lot of Ennis fans on the board. I can see Ennis dominating the Punisher stories (what else was there, after all), but for him to dominate this list too when Constantine has been handled by other just-as-big writers makes me inclined to think that we’re a little Ennis-biased on the whole.

Very few just-as-big writers have had runs on Hellblazer. Basically just one, Warren Ellis, who had a brief run on the book (Ellis’ “Haunted,” by the way, came in #11). Ennis is more popular than every other writer to have had a run on Hellblazer (Morrison and Gaiman are more popular, but both just wrote a couple of issues, and one of Gaiman’s issues even made the list!). Alan Moore wrote Constantine outside of Hellblazer, and he’s obviously more popular than Ennis, and Moore also happened to finish #2 on the list, only beaten by the Hellblazer story that was adapted for the Constantine film, which is a pretty good sign that it was a popular story.

So Ennis’ dominance seems pretty unsurprising to me. I mean, it’s a bit disappointing, if only for the lack of variety, but not surprising.

Hmm, I dunno Brian. I’d argue that Brian Azzarello, Paul Jenkins, Mike Carey, and possibly now even Andy Diggle are just as popular as Ennis is currently. Ennis in his Peacher era prime is one thing, but he’s nowhere near the name that he used to be.

And don’t get me wrong, I love Garth’s Hellblazer run. There were just others I love more (Jenkins, Carey).

I love Ennis’s Constantine.

The strangest thing about it is that it’s a softer, kindler, gentler Constantine, when you compare it to the utter bastard and borderline villain that was Jamie Delano’s version. Yep, I can’t believe I am using Garth Ennis and softer in the same sentence.

Just for the record (and since I totally spaced and forgot to vote), here’s my Top Ten Hellblazer Stories:

10) “Lapdogs and Englishmen” (Azzarello/Guy Davis)
9) “Down In the Ground Where the Dead Men Go” (Carey/Manco)
8) “The Family Man” (Delano/Various)
7) “Royal Blood” (Ennis/Will Simpson)
6) “Newcastle: A Taste of Things to Come” (Delano/Piers Rayner)
5) “Desperately Seeking Something” (Jenkins/Phillips)
4) “Telling Tales” (Ellis/Frusin)
3) “All His Engines” (Carey/Manco)
2) “Damnation’s Flame” (Ennis/Dillon)
1) “Critical Mass” (Jenkins/Phillips)

Denise Mina’s run is completely forgettable (probably the worst run in the book’s history), and Diggle’s wasn’t anywhere near as impressive as I hoped it would be. Given time, though, I wouldn’t be surprised to see some of Milligan’s stuff on the best of list.

Brian: I stand corrected!

Hmm, I dunno Brian. I’d argue that Brian Azzarello, Paul Jenkins, Mike Carey, and possibly now even Andy Diggle are just as popular as Ennis is currently. Ennis in his Peacher era prime is one thing, but he’s nowhere near the name that he used to be.

Ennis’ The Boys is in the Top 100. Do you know how few creator-owned titles are in the Top 100? When you add in the fact that it’s not even put out by one of the “premier” publishers AND there are no media tie-ins to it – that says a lot for Ennis’ popularity. It’s selling about 50% better than Carey’s creator-owned title, which is put out by Vertigo (and Unwritten is selling better than 100 Bullets was).

The SPIN-OFF of Ennis’ Avatar series, Crossed, out-sold the latest issue of Hellblazer.

All those guys you listed are great. Love their work. But none of them are more popular than Ennis, even with him not doing a book for the “big guys” for awhile.

“Ennis’ The Boys is in the Top 100. Do you know how few creator-owned titles are in the Top 100? When you add in the fact that it’s not even put out by one of the “premier” publishers AND there are no media tie-ins to it – that says a lot for Ennis’ popularity. It’s selling about 50% better than Carey’s creator-owned title, which is put out by Vertigo (and Unwritten is selling better than 100 Bullets was).

The SPIN-OFF of Ennis’ Avatar series, Crossed, out-sold the latest issue of Hellblazer.

All those guys you listed are great. Love their work. But none of them are more popular than Ennis, even with him not doing a book for the “big guys” for awhile.”

Would the Boys being in the top 100 also have to maybe do with the fact that it’s by Garth Ennis AND Darrick Robertson, like it’s the team that sells it? I would imagine that some people would buy it for the combination.

@Josh: IMHO, it was more that Ennis was showing how Constantine destroys the lives of everyone around him and is stuck in an endless cycle of loss. Here is my top ten:
1. Dangerous Habits (#41-46): To me, this is the definitive Constantine story. How he basically buys immortality through trickery was brilliant.
2. A Rake at the Gates of Hell (#78-83): The end of everything that Dangerous Habits began. Another story that showcases how even when he’s behind John is always ahead.
3. Newcastle: A Taste of Things to Come (#11): Simply an incredibly emotional story.
4. The Fear Machine (#14-22): The John Constantine as hippy traveller thing was an intersting direction, and the supporting cast was cool.
5. Forty (#63): This was such a fun story. It’s the story of John’s fortieth birthday party while Kit is out of town, featuring Zatanna, The Lord of the Dance, Swamp Thing, and even a guest appearance by the Phantom Stranger at just the wrong moment.
6. Going For It (#3): This is a wacky fun story that’s bitingly satirical and features some great surreal Constantine sneakiness. John fights some yuppy demons by using their own game against them.
7. Royal Blood (#52-55): Another great political story with a dose of classic Ennis twistedness, as Constantine has to track down a demon possessed Prince Charles.
8. The Family Man (#24, 28-30): The chilling story of John fighting the darkness within humanity rather than the darkness around it.
9. Early Warning/How I Learned to Love the Bomb (#25-26): Classic Grant Morrison weirdness with amazing, moody art from David Lloyd. A really cool story in which a government science experiment causes a whole town to go mad.
10. Damnation’s Flame (#73-75): Constantine is banished to a bizarre, voodoo powered twisted mirror image of America, where he must find his way out with help from a partially brainless JFK and the dead sister of a voodoo priest. Amazingly surreal.

Also, Fear and Loathing (IIRC that’s the one) also features the birth of Genesis from Preacher, with John acting as midwife.

Damn – I just realised I accidentally voted for Royal Blood when I meant Bad Blood (the Delano/Phillip Bond miniseries and the only Delano Hellblazer story I really liked).

My votes:
1 – Swamp Thing: American Gothic (2)
2 – Dangerous Habits (1)
3 – Shoot!
4 – Royal Blood (Oops – I really meant Bad Blood)
5 – Hold Me (10)
6 – Good Intentions
7 – Hellblazer #51
8 – Rake at the Gates of Hell (4)

funkygreenjerusalem

June 1, 2010 at 4:50 am

I’d argue that Brian Azzarello, Paul Jenkins, Mike Carey, and possibly now even Andy Diggle are just as popular as Ennis is currently.

The big difference between Ennis and all those guys?

Since The Demon – his first US series? – he hasn’t had a series canceled.

All of the others have.

And another, Ennis has three popular long running ongoing series under his belt, besides Hellblazer – Preacher, Hitman and Punisher MAX… and The Boys, currently – Azz has 100 Bullets and Carey has Lucifer (and maybe Unwritten), but Jenkins and Diggle don’t.

Would the Boys being in the top 100 also have to maybe do with the fact that it’s by Garth Ennis AND Darrick Robertson, like it’s the team that sells it?

Why is everyone so down on Ennis being popular?

He’s one of the best writers the business has, with a very solid body of work – why is this such a shock?

I would imagine that some people would buy it for the combination.

If someone wanted, there’s been a few issues with fill-in’s, and a mini drawn by John Mcrea – you could compare sales figures.

Especially since it isn’t, like, a value judgment about how great the guy is or anything. Feel free to think other writers are better than him in general or working on John Constantine in particular. Just noting that he is very popular, and his Hellblazer run was very popular, so when you have a popular vote about the best John Constantine stories, the odds are pretty good that the very popular writer who had a very popular run on John Constantine’s title is going to be very well represented.

Here’s my list:

1. Newcastle (Hellblazer 11, or the whole “Nergal” arc from 4-12)
2. Dangerous Habits
3. Hellblazer 50 (Lord of Vampires)
4. American Gothic (Swamp Thing 37-50)
5. Family Man (Hellblazer 28-31)
6. Son of Man
7. Fear and Loathing (Hellblazer 64-66)
8. Books of Magic 2 (Gaiman miniseries)
9. Hellblazer 1-2 (Mnemoth)
10. Dead Boy’s Heart (Hellblazer 35 (as a little boy))

I was pleasantly surprised Books of Magic and Family Man ranked, I expected those to be forgotten. Even Fear and Loathing ranked a bit higher than I expected. Loved the “oh shit” reveal in that Gabriel storyline, a nasty, graphic splash by Dillon that I didn’t see coming at all…)

I wouldn’t have counted those Bloodlines issues as one story, but there you go (issue 50 was great, though, it brought me back to Hellblazer after a long absence).

I had no idea All His Engines was an original graphic novel, I thought it was part of a run. This makes me want to check it out (as I’m a Mike Carey fan, just have been shy about investing in his Hellblazer run).

Personally Andy Diggle’s had my favorite run since Ennis, but I couldn’t pick out a storyline that I honestly felt topped the picks on my list. Milligan’s finally starting to pick up some steam, too (I loved his recent “No Future” two-parter, that would have made a top 15 for sure).

I just had a baby!

I’ve only ever dabbled in Hellblazer – random issues pulled from the back issue bins here and there.

But one random issue that I pulled really stuck out to me – one where he travels to Italy to dig up the bones of St. Nicholas (Santa Claus), which he proceeded to grind into powder, snort, and get a “magic power-boosting high” on the spirit of Christmas.

It came across much better than how it sounds from my description. Can’t remember who wrote that one but I loved the irreverency in it. How much more irreverent can you get than digging up ole’ St. Nick’s bones and sucking them up your nose in the middle of the Christmas season.

That was a Diggle issue.

Technically, A Murder of Crows is only the second half of “American Gothic”, all of which represents the first Constantine story. (The first half is in the trade called “The Curse”, and contains the character’s first speaking appearance).

(And I’m sad not to see any of Veitch’s Swamp Thing run, which contained some excelled Constantine bits, reach the list.)

Hi Funky,

I’m not down at all on Ennis being so popular; I love Ennis’s work. My wondering what Darrick Robertson contributed to the sales figures was more a musing, and has more to do with a fascination of how certain combinations can affect sales (e.g., Miller/Lee on ASBAR).

Just to clarify: not down on Ennis’s popularity. Love Ennis. Just musing.

Lots of people don’t get Ennis. He hides a lot of really complex, smart stuff behind mounds of gore and twisted shock scenes. Preacher is one of the best comments on organized religion ever written, featuring some amazing stuff about the nature of God. And everything he writes has great examinations of interpersonal relationships and what brings people together and pulls them apart.

Preacher is my absolute favorite comic book series ever that goes beyond 32 issues.

Travis Pelkie

June 2, 2010 at 2:54 am

Ok, Hangman, what lasted 32 issues that you liked more?

Fascinating bits from Brian and FGJ about Ennis. Didn’t realize the Boys is in the top 100. I’ve only read the first 8 issues, but eventually I hope to get more.

What you might compare, if you want to examine the role Darick Robertson plays, is to compare the Boys sales to Transmet sales, since both books are “limited series” of 60 issues and both are written by great and popular writers. The other element of that is that Boys is about superheroes and Transmet wasn’t. So perhaps one could gauge the role Robertson plays in the sales.

But oh, we’re talking about Constantine here. I too dug the Veitch Swamp Thing issue (70, I believe) kicking off a Constantine-centric story where he’s facing off against Swampy (because of Tefe, I believe) (didn’t I post this on the voting comments?) I haven’t read enough Hellblazer to judge it overall, though. I should pick up more back issues. I did get the dollar copy of issue 1, and got a few back issues (the Jason Aaron ones and 250) for a buck a pop on FCBD. Haven’t gotten to read them yet though.

I just saw on a CBR forum that, supposedly, Vertigo characters (like Swamp Thing, Black Orchid, presumably Constantine, etc) are going to be allowed to be used in mainstream DC books. There’s some possibilities with that. As someone said, Constantine appearing in Dini’s Zatanna would work nicely.

Promethea.

I had originally written “12 issues” but then I remembered Promethea.

I re read all of hellblazer recently, and I was struck by how bad Dangerous Habits was, and how brilliant the Delano issues were. Aside from (in my opinion) a weak story, Dangerous Habits had terrible art. Simpson can normally draw good comics, but for some reason he didnt on this story. I’d have put the Delano/Ridgeway Vietnam story at 1, with some milligan, more delano and moore of course!

Davey Boy Smith

June 7, 2010 at 5:05 am

I’m glad to see someone mention “How I learned to love the bomb”, even if it didn’t make the list. For me, those two issues along with # 27 by Gaiman and McKean set the standard by which other Hellblazer tales are measured.

I greatly enjoyed Bad Blood by Delano, Pleece and Bond, as well as that one hilarious issue by Delano and Phillips (# 80-something, I believe) that focused on Chas’ mom and her pet chimpanzee.

Jenkins’ work on the title never did it for me.

Matt Lazorwitz

June 7, 2010 at 5:19 am

Bad Blood has one of my top spots too. I love that story. And I forgot about the origin of Chaz issue with his mom and the monkey! That’s a great story.

Delano is great for sheer weirdness and crazy stories and setting up the character in the first place with the wonderful Nergal and Zed storylines. Ellis is also good. But honestly I have to go with Garth Ennis for my favorite. Alot of what he wrote here was echoed in Preacher a few years down the road.

The hilarious and disturbing Son of Man storyline where a “rape demon” tries to bring forth the AntiChrist.

The great comedy of Constantine’s 40th b-day party where Swamp Thing makes marijuana grow.

The “Confession” storyline where the priest who tried to kill Constantine ended up hearing the first “confession” from the First of the Fallen.

The wonderful story where Constantine goes witchwalking thanks to Papa Midnite and ends up in hell with JFK holding his brains in his head and Constantine asks him if the rumor is true that the reason he didnt’ duck was because he threw out his back getting a blowjob from Marilyn Monroe and the brace he was wearing prevented him.

And of course, the chillingness of the First of the Fallen’s schemes. And I was genuinely moved by Kit and Brendan’s stories.

Fave panel though is Steve Dillon’s panel after Constantine has killed the King of the Vampires and his face has a wonderful “@CK YOU” look on it, lit by the fire of the burning vampire, he is drinking from a bottle. Ennis’s lines are great. “It takes of evil. Hatred. Spite. Curelty. Sadism. It tastes of screwing the other bastard good and proper…it tastes of winning….And I drain it to the last frigging drop.”

Yes, I’m an Ennis fanboy. How could you tell? lol I miss Hitman and Preacher and Punisher though. Boys, while good, is just a bit to crude and not enough meaning to really feel like great Ennis material. He hates religion and superheroes. WE GET IT! Do something new!

For sheer disturbing ability, Azzarello’s Hard Time and Highwater rank up there as well.

Davey Boy Smith

June 8, 2010 at 8:39 am

Ennis’ made me feel for Brendan and Kit, as well. He made them feel like real people, and I wish we had the chance to check up on them 12 years after the Heartland special, which was a thing of beauty. Only a select few authors are capable of the level of melancholy Ennis brings to his stories. I certainly wouldn’t read his comics only for the gore and crude humour.

i really enjoyed life during wartime. it was a book of magic spinoff of when Tim Hunter was older and he basically interacts with his friends, Zatanna, John Constantine and a shit load of demons. probably one of the best fantasy stories i’ve ever read

I have made many questionable purchases on e-bay in my time, but one of them still stands out as the greatest – the last 8 original pages of the “Dangerous Habits”-storyline, culminating in Constantine giving the finger to the lords of hell. It was sold by someone handling the estate of their uncle, and they clearly had no idea what they were worth – got all eight for $350…

I have made many questionable purchases on e-bay in my time, but one of them still stands out as the greatest – the last 8 original pages of the “Dangerous Habits”-storyline, culminating in Constantine giving the finger to the lords of hell. It was sold by someone handling the estate of their uncle, and they clearly had no idea what they were worth – got all eight for $350…

Holy crap, that is an amazing purchase.

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