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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comics – Day 154

Here is the latest in our year-long look at one cool comic (whether it be a self-contained work, an ongoing comic or a run on a long-running title that featured multiple creative teams on it over the years) a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the moments posted so far!

Today we take a look at the delightfully bizarre tale from Luke Cage, Hero for Hire of the time that Doctor Doom tried to stiff Luke Cage out of $200. Not a smart move, Doom (Steve Englehart, George Tuska and Billy Graham were the creative team)!!

Enjoy!

The action begins in Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #8, when Luke is approached by some dude about making $200 a day taking down some folks…

Luke is displeased to learn that the people he was hired to deal with were actually robots. He feels that he is not being dealt with straight, so he takes his issue to the guy he thinks is in charge, but learns someone ELSE is really in charge…

So Luke takes out all the robots, but is dismayed to learn that his $200 fee is not going to be honored…

The next issue (Tuska drew the hell out of the first issue – the second part is part Tuska, part Billy Graham) opens with Luke breaking in to the Fantastic Four’s headquarters to borrow a plane to get to Latveria…

Once there, Luke takes advantage of a civil war going on (led by a dude called the Faceless One, who is leading an army of robots, much like the ones Luke dealt with in the States) to gain access to Doom’s castle…

“Where’s my money, honey?” is a transcendentally beautiful piece of dialogue.

I won’t spoil what happens next to the story – does Cage get his money?!?! Find out in the Essential Luke Cage, Hero for Hire, in stores now (I think I spoiled the ending in a Year of Cool Comic Moments, but who wants to go through the effort of finding it there? Better to just buy the book!).

41 Comments

I think my favorite part in this whole story is Doom’s monologue about how his armor was designed to withstand anything except a whole lot of punching. Might want to look into that.

“Where’s my money, honey?” is the greatest Luke Cage moment of all time. Too bad its all downhill for the character after this :/*

*although to be fair, its hard to top such incredible dialog like that

Pretty lame set up though. Doom would have just left the money with the doorman and not even bothered with Cage any more. The man is rich enough to set fire to a Renoir. :-)

liked the story for . even doom learned the price of messing with Luke Cage for he wanted his money and Doom did not pay so Luke goes collecting. his own style.

This is brilliant. I might have to find this.

And I totally believe that Doom would stiff Cage. Doom’s arrogant enough to think he’d get away with it.

dude just wanted his $200, i know the feeling.

Dr. Doom was misportrayed by that writer. It was established long ago that Dr. Doom is honorable. The real Dr. Doom would have paid Luke Cage the money. I’d have to say the story premise fails.

Maybe it wasn’t really Dr. Doom here, but one of his doombots.

“Where’s my two dollars? I want my two dollars! Two Dollars!”

Annoyed Grunt

June 4, 2010 at 8:52 am

I always loved the fact that Reed is willing to sacrifice a rocket that costs god knows how much just to bust Doom’s balls.

@The Watcher: Looking at the hole, I’d say he’s definitely a Doombot. That goes pretty deep.

A delirously fun story. A few random comments:

1.Art:Brian, you weren’t kidding about Tuska “drawing the hell” out of issue 8. That is some of the best Tuska artwork that I have ever seen.

2. Doombot: We all know that that was not the real Doom. The dead giveaway? Poor grammar. In page 19, panel 4 of issue 8, the Doombot states:”No one ever emigrates to my land.” When a person is leaving a country, he is emigrating from it. When he is moving to a country, he is immigrating to it.Obviously, the poor Doombot’s grammar circuits were malfunctioning.

I wonder if Dwayne McDuffie had this story in mind in a later Damage Control story where once again, Doom apparently skips out on a bill from the company. It turns out that one of his minions pocketed the money instead and Doom paid up. I can’t recall if he killed the guy or not for though

I think the doorman lied and kept the $200 bucks. ;-)

Fade out = Luke Cage gets laid in the gutter.

Love it. And I love even more the real humans who worship the character Doom who get all up in their panties about such a thing as this.

Yeah, Joe, as soon as I saw the comments I thought of your stance on Doom defenders.

Isn’t Doctor Doom actually a motherless son of a witch? :)

The Crazed Spruce

June 4, 2010 at 10:42 am

I’m pretty sure it was retconned as a Doombot. (Wasn’t that one of your “Meta-Message” posts, Brian? Or am I thinking of something else?) Still a fun story, though. :)

Brian, didn’t you already feature this comic in another column?

Yeah, I said that in the above piece, right?

I won’t spoil what happens next to the story – does Cage get his money?!?! Find out in the Essential Luke Cage, Hero for Hire, in stores now (I think I spoiled the ending in a Year of Cool Comic Moments, but who wants to go through the effort of finding it there? Better to just buy the book!).

Oops, sorry, I didn’t read the last paragraph of your piece. I admit it.

(Wasn’t that one of your “Meta-Message” posts, Brian? Or am I thinking of something else?)

I think you’re thinking of the Doombot who let Arcade light a match on his armor. As far as I know, this Doom has never been identified as a Doombot.

“Careful– eyes on the work!”

Brian, since you’ve brought up this comic twice now why don’t you balance it out and add Doctor Doom to one of your “Greatest Stories” choices. You’ve passed him by a couple of times now….or are you trolling the Doom aficionados?

Joe Rice; It’s all in good fun ….. no one’s panties have been effected. Why didn’t you say shorts by the way?? ;-) chauvinist!!

Dwayne McDuffie

June 4, 2010 at 11:26 am

My Damage Control story ” When Doom Defaults!” was a direct response to this one, which I hated as a child. Doom fires his assistant, who is relieved that he wasn’t killed.

You’ve passed him by a couple of times now….or are you trolling the Doom aficionados?

Yes, the same way that I am trolling Spider-Man, Superman, Doctor Strange, Wonder Woman, Hulk, Robin, Cyclops, Nightwing, Daredevil and Aquaman aficionados (to name ten other characters who did not get Greatest Stories lists). ;)

comicbookreader

June 4, 2010 at 11:49 am

25 comments in and no one has yet to point out Medusa’s wonderful line of dialogue:
“I must say, Reed Richards, that I rather admire the man’s spunk!”

Cage n’ Medusa must’ve been the Rogue-Sentry hook-up of the 1970s!

Yay!!!! Dwayne McDuffie confirms my suspicions!!

Steven R. Stahl

June 4, 2010 at 2:49 pm

The story is just fun to read.

Re the characterization of Doom: Consider that he has assorted neuroses and psychoses. That’s why he’s a villain. Unless someone who commits a crime has a rationale that would do well in an ethical dilemma test, he’s had a mental problem of some sort. Coming up with a reason, satisfactory to him, to avoid paying what he owed Cage would be trivial.

Saying that Doom wasn’t really Doom, that was a Doombot, has happened so many times, via retcon or as part of the story, that it’s part of what’s ruined Doom as a character. Writers ought to consider that when a character is virtually interchangeable with a robot, he’s not being written as an actual, living character.

SRS

Iron Maiden: I just assumed everyone wears panties. They feel so nice.

Interesting plot – don’t you think Luke (or at least, Marvel, IRL) oughta sue Mel Gibson for plagiarism?

After all, even tiny plot similarities seem to get lawyers stirred up, and this one is even closer to the film script than some of those that actually won or settled their lawsuits.

I love the idea of Dr. Doom as a deadbeat. Experience has shown me that anytime someone talks that much about their honor and values that you really should get paid in advance.

Joe: Too much information :-)

Steven Stahl: You are on the right track about the Doombot scenarios (of course, he used one in his 1st appearance in FF#5) . While as Walter Simonson will be the first to point out that John Byrne expanded on this idea of Doombots, he posted on this subject about why he felt compelled to come up with his somewhat controversial use of Doombots in FF#350. It was because he felt that Doom had been handled in a way he felt was out of character, specifically that Kristoff-Doom would be able to kick him off the throne and keep him off for quite a while.

Here’s a couple of posts on the FF MB I mod:

http://www.comicboards.com/php/show.php?rpy=fantasticfour-2006062404460900&search=Walter+Simonson

http://www.comicboards.com/php/show.php?rpy=fantasticfour-2007102301351500&search=Walter+Simonson

Interesting plot – don’t you think Luke (or at least, Marvel, IRL) oughta sue Mel Gibson for plagiarism?

I get it is a joke, but I’m just curious as to which film you’re referring.

I think it would be an interesting follow up if you also spotlighted Dwayne McDuffie’s response to this story just for contrast. After all, you’ve featured this same story twice.

I miss Medusa as a member of the FF.

Money recovered = $200.

Cost of rocket flight to Latveria = $200,000 (or whatever).

If Cage were a smart businessman, he would’ve charged Doom for the time and expense of collecting his fee. That may explain why Heroes for Hire never did well.

Nah… Reed payed the freight on the rocket trip. Maybe that’s why the FF has gone bankrupt a couple of times.

Basara549 beat me to it – it’s a reference to probably the only Mel Gibson movie I like: “Payback”. I was going to say, either Mel or someone else on that film’s creative team had to have read the “Luke Cage goes after Doom for $200″ story.

PAYBACK was based on 1967′s POINTE BLANK with Lee Marvin. Both of which were derived from the original novel THE HUNTER by Donald E. Westlake. So, the idea pre-dates Luke Cage by about a decade.

John Cusak is apparently a huge fan of POINTE BLANK as evidenced by his first screenplay and producing credit coming on GROSSE POINTE BLANK. So, it is possible that the “Two Dollars” gag had the same genesis.

Dwayne McDuffie

June 6, 2010 at 2:44 pm

The Hunter was published in 1962. I’m a total mark for Westlake’s “Richard Stark” novels. And Darwin Cooke just did a pretty cool graphic Novel adaptation of “The Hunter,” as I attempt to keep this on topic.

Dwayne McDuffie…. Just wanted to say I really liked your FF run a couple of year back and the FF special with the Latverian “Rapprochement Day” . You and Paul Pelletier made a great team.

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