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Vote for the 75 Most Memorable Moments in DC Comics History!!

It’s time for you to vote for your picks for the most memorable moments in DC Comics History! I was originally going to have you each vote for your top 10, but you know what, after seeing how much you guys seem to dig using polls (I always get better turnout when all I ask is for people to click a button rather than write out lists), I think I will use a poll again.

So here’s what we’ll do – I’ll give you a list of your 100 options for the 75 Most Memorable Moments in DC Comics History. You click on the poll for every moment YOU find to be memorable (click on as many as you feel qualify – it’s a multiple choice poll) and on August 9th, I’ll begin to count down the 75 moments with the most votes!

Here are your 100 options to vote on, as well as the poll you will use to vote! NOTE: There will certainly be some spoilers for past comic books in these moments, plus there is some content that originally appeared in “Mature Readers Only” comics, so be forewarned!

Otherwise, enjoy (the poll ends at 11:59 PM, Pacific August 8th)

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Moment 1. Baby Superman speeds away from his dying home planet in a rocket ship (Action Comics #1)

One of the most iconic visuals in comic book history, courtesy of Superman’s creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster.
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Moment 2. Green Lantern learns a difficult lesson (Green Lantern Vol. 2 #76)

In Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams’ first issue of Green Lantern (where Green Lantern began teaming up with Green Arrow), Hal Jordan is shown how out of touch he is with the plight of typical Americans at the beginning of the 1970s – this helps spur Jordan to travel across the country with Green Arrow re-discovering America.
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Moment 3. Batman shoots a vampire (Detective Comics #32)

Matt Wagner basically built an entire mini-series around this issue. The sight of Batman using a gun (for the first time ever) is still one that sticks in people’s minds (hence Neal Adams using it for the cover of Batman Odyssey). Bob Kane, Gardner Fox and Sheldon Moldoff were the creative team on this issue.
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Moment 4. Darkseid revealed as the “big bad” of the Great Darkness Saga (Legion of Super-Heroes #293)

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After a number of issues teasing who the mastermind was behind the Great Darkness Saga, Paul Levitz and Keith Giffen’s reveal that it is Darkseid, alive in the future, was inspired.

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Moment 5. A group of Legionnaires willingly risk their lives to revive the fallen Lightning Lad (Adventure Comics #312)

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Edmond Hamilton and John Forte deliver one of the most famous scenes in legion of Super-Heroes history, and the fact that the Legionnaire who died was a shapeshifting pet who was only making his second appearance in this issue really did not even feel like a cop-out in the context of this powerful tale.
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Moment 6. Batman duels Ra’s Al Ghul in the desert…bare-chested (Batman #244)

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From the first major Ra’s Al Ghul saga, Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams truly nail the whole “international man of action” vibe that they were going for with Batman in this storyline. This is a frequently homaged battle.
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Moment 7. Aquaman’s son is murdered by Black Manta (Adventure Comics #452)

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There is a good case to be made that this 1977 story by David Michelinie and Jim Aparo was the one that started the whole trend of murdering off the loved ones of superheroes. In any event, a super villain murdering a superhero’s infant son? That’s a major turning point in DC history.
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Moment 8. Superman expresses his frustrations at Mongul (Superman Annual #11)

From Alan Moore and Dave Gibbon’s brilliant “For the Man Who Has Everything,” Superman was just subjected to some heavy duty psychological torture at the hands of the villain Mongul (and on Superman’s BIRTHDAY, of all days!), and Superman is quite displeased with Mongul…


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Moment 9. Hot shot District Attorney Harvey Kent gets a face full of acid (Detective Comics #66)

There’s not many SUPERHEROES who have as famous of an origin as the classic Batman villain, Two-Face. Here it is from 1942′s Detective Comics #66, by Bob Kane, Bill Finger, Jerry Robinson and George Roussos.
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Moment 10. John Constantine outsmarts a trio of demons (Hellblazer #45)

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In what has become pretty much the most famous Hellblazer story of all time, Garth Ennis and Will Simpson have John Constantine cheat death itself, as a dying-of-cancer Constantine cons a trio of demons by selling his souls to all three of them separately. So if Constantine dies, the demons would have to wage a terrible war against each other, which does not serve either of their interests at this point. So they cure Constantine of cancer (note that he goes right back to smoking upon being cured) and he gives them the finger. This was loosely adapted into the Constantine film.
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Moment 11. Joker gets in one last joke (Batman: The Dark Knight #3)

In Frank Miller’s dark tale of Batman in the future, Batman has captured the Joker, but the Joker decides to get one last piece of revenge by framing Batman for his murder. Frank Miller captures the darkness of this madness beautifully.
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Moment 12. Dick Grayson becomes Nightwing (Tales of the Teen Titans #44)

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No offense to Jericho, but man, that sort of puts a damper on Dick’s moment, no? Anyhow, in this penultimate chapter of the Judas Contract, Marv Wolfman and George Perez debut the new costumed identity for Dick Grayson. This was pretty much the first time a character THIS big got a new identity (other than characters taking up new names for a storyline, like Cap becoming Nomad).
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Moment 13. John Stewart dooms an entire planet (Cosmic Odyssey #2)

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In the pages right before this (which were written and drawn, just the pages above, by Jim Starlin and Mike Mignola), John Stewart was bragging about how his Green Lantern ring could pretty much do anything. The planet of Xanshi was destroyed because he was wrong. Pretty much THE defining plot point for John Stewart in the comics ever since.
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Moment 14. Superman meets the cousin he didn’t know he had – Supergirl! (Action Comics #252)

Otto Binder and Al Plastino give the world a brand-new superhero, and one of the most popular female superheroes ever! Doesn’t Plastino do a fantastic job on her facial expressions?
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Moment 15. Batman discovers the Hyperclan’s secret (JLA #3)

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This issue was pretty much the introduction of Grant Morrison’s “Bat-God” take on Batman. This JLA run had already gotten off to a great start, but this scene took it to the next level. Howard Porter was the artist.
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Moment 16. Ozymandias’ plan goes into effect (Watchmen #11)

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Forget Watchmen, the “thirty-five minutes ago” line is one of the most famous lines from comics PERIOD.

Beautiful work by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.
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Moment 17. Death of Supergirl (Crisis on Infinite Earths #7)

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Marv Wolfman and George Perez give Superman’s cousin an extremely heroic, heartfelt send-off in this touching moment from Crisis on Infinite Earths.
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Moment 18. Is Batman a man or a fiend from hell? (Batman #244)

This is how awesome Batman #244 is – this isn’t even the last moment from this Denny O’Neil/Neal Adams classic. Still, in terms of “wow, Batman is awesome?” you don’t get much cooler than the reaction Ra’s gives him here.
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Moment 19. The revelation of the Fourth Man (Planetary #12)

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All throughout the series, Warren Ellis and John Cassaday laid hints as to who the mysterious “Fourth Man” of Planetary was – here, Elijah Snow discovers the truth – the man he has been searching for has been him all along!
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Moment 20. Superman reveals his secret identity to Lois Lane (Action Comics #662)

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You know, oddly enough, the actual PROPOSAL (and acceptance) between Lois and Clark really is not all that memorable (and as such, won’t be on the list), but the reveal of his identity sure was. A job well done by Roger Stern and Bob McLeod…
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Moment 21. Earth-2 is discovered! (Flash #123)

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In this important issue, Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino introduce the concept of TWO Earths to work in the fact that DC had had previous incarnations of the Flash, Green Lantern, etc. This is the first meeting of heroes from both worlds.
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Moment 22. Gordon and Batman’s alliance begins (Batman #407)

As awesome as Batman Year One was, only this last scene was actually included more or less word for word in the film Batman Begins. It’s a beautifully memorable ending by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli.
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Moment 23. Wonder Woman wins the contest to go to Man’s World! (All-Star Comics #8)

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William Moulton Marston and H.G. Peter deliver the iconic origin of Wonder Woman.
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Moment 24. Batman – ladies’ man (Batman #244)

Perhaps the perfect representation of what Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams saw as their take on Batman, international man of mystery.
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Moment 25. Silk Spectre and Nite-Owl discover the power of costumes (Watchmen #7)

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In one of the most notable sequences in Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen, Nite-Owl and Silk Spectre find that while they were unable to have sex when they were in their secret identities, after a night of superheroing, well…things went differently…
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Moment 26. Barry Allen has a little accident (Showcase #4)

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Robert Kanigher, Julie Schwartz and Carmine Infantino deliver one of the most famous origins of the Silver Age. So famous that John Broome later just re-used it for Kid Flash’s origin!
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Moment 27. Batman fights the Mutant gang leader for the first time (Batman: The Dark Knight #2)

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Batman attacks the Mutants in his Batmobile/tank, but he can’t help but want to get in there and fight man to man, and this beautiful slash page by Frank Miller captures that feeling perfectly.
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Moment 28. Morpheus and a demon have a contest (Sandman #4)

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In this early issue of Sandman, Neil Gaiman (and artists Mike Dringenberg and Sam Kieth) has Morpheus go around and re-collect his magical items he had lost in his years of imprisonment. To regain one of his items, he has a contest with a demon from hell. This exchange was so famous that it was even turned into an online political ad in 2008 (with Obama taking Morpheus’ lines and Hillary Clinton taking the demon’s lines).
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Moment 29. Abin Sur finds a replacement (Showcase #22)

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John Broome and Gil Kane deliver the iconic origin of Hal Jordan of Earth, the new Green Lantern of Sector 2814!
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Moment 30. Animal Man meets his maker (Animal Man #25)

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In this cliffhanger at the end of the penultimate issue of Grant Morrison’s Animal Man run, Animal Man comes face to face with Morrison himself! Chas Truog drew the comic.
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Moment 31. Blue Beetle is defiant in the face of death (Countdown to Infinite Crisis #1)

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Countdown to Infinite Crisis was written by Geoff Johns, Greg Rucka and Judd Winick. It was drawn by a number of artists, with Phil Jimenez being the one who drew this final confrontation between Blue Beetle and Maxwell Lord, where Beetle discovers Lord’s plans before anyone else, including Batman. Sadly, Beetle pays for his discover with his life, but at least he went down heroically.
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Moment 32. Lex Luthor reacts poorly to bad news (Adventure Comics #271)

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Jerry Siegel gave the most famous origin to Lex Luthor in this issue, drawn by Al Plastino (isn’t it amazing how good of an expressionist Plastino was?).
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Moment 33. The first woman in a refrigerator (Green Lantern v3 #54)

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Ron Marx and Darryl Banks had just introduced the new Green Lantern, Kyle Rayner, when his girlfriend, Alex DeWitt, was viciously murdered by a villain sent to retrieve Kyle’s ring.
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Moment 34. Dick Grayson loses one relationship, gain a new, unhealthy one (Detective Comics #38)

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In Detective Comics #38, Bill Finger, Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson followed up the origin of Batman a few issues earlier with the origin of Batman’s new partner, Dick Grayson, or Robin, the Boy Wonder!
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Moment 35. Swamp Thing and Abby get better acquainted (Swamp Thing #34)

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Alan Moore, Stephen Bissette and John Totleben deliver a breathtaking endeavor when they show how Swamp Thing and his girlfriend, Abby, have sex – or at least Swamp Thing’s version of sex.

There are many brilliant pages, so look at the ones above as more emblematic than anything else.
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Moment 36. Superman discovers a new use for Kryptonite (Superman #233)

In this first issue of the Julie Schwartz-mandated revamp of Superman, all Kryptonite on Earth has been changed to iron. Denny O’Neil and Curt Swan demonstrate this change through a classic scene.
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Moment 37. Barry Allen makes the ultimate sacrifice to save the Multiverse (Crisis on Infinite Earths #8)

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Yeah, the Multiverse ended up getting more or less destroyed ANYways (then later brought back), and yeah, Barry Allen eventually came back to life, but this is still a classic scene from Marv Wolfman and George Perez! The guy is RUNNING HIMSELF TO DEATH TO SAVE THE UNIVERSE! That’s awesome.
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Moment 38. Hal first recites his oath (Showcase #22)

John Broome and Gil Kane deliver the second-most iconic oath ever (outside of the Pledge of Allegience)* in this second story from the issue that one story earlier gave us the debut of Hal Jordan as Green Lantern.

*It is not actually the second-most iconic oath ever. That was a joke.
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Moment 39. Ferro Lad sacrifices himself (Adventure Comics #353)

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Jim Shooter was not even on the title for a year before he killed of his first Legionnaire, in this dramatic story that would be referenced a number of times over the years, with the mid-1990s DC event, Final Night, being the most notable.
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Moment 40. Superman doubles his pleasure AND doubles his fun (Superman #162)

When you think back upon classic Superman writers, Leo Dorfman might not automatically come to mind, but alongside legendary Superman artist, Curt Swan, Dorfman delivered one of the most memorable “Imaginary Stories” of all-time.
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Moment 41. Green Arrow’s ward is a junkie?!!? (Green Lantern #85)

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Denny O’Neill and Neal Adams had this story worked out BEFORE the famous Spider-Man drugs issue, but DC was wary about putting it out against the Comics Code. Luckily, the Spidey story led to the Code changing and this issue was released, and it was a much stronger anti-drug storyline than the Spidey one.
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Moment 42. The Waynes take a night stroll (Detective Comics #33)

The parent death that pretty much all parental deaths are measured against. Bill Finger actually only wrote the first two pages of Detective Comics #33 (Gardner Fox wrote the rest) just so he could deliver this origin story. Bob Kane and Sheldon Moldoff did the artwork.
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Moment 43. Lex Luthor is a big, fat jerk (Superman Vol. 2 #9)

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While the Post-Crisis Lex Luthor has moved past this characterization in many ways, for a good many years this was a very popular take on Lex Luthor, and this back-up story where Lex Luthor offers a waitress one million dollars to spend a month with him really stood out to demonstrate the type of villain this Lex Luthor was.
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Moment 44. David Knight has an inauspicious debut as Starman (Starman #0)

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This was a pretty darn striking opening to the acclaimed James Robinson and Tony Harris run on Starman. Rarely does the title character of a book die in the first three pages.
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Moment 45. Wonder Woman does not see eye-to-eye on things with Maxwell Lord (Wonder Woman Vol. 2 #219)

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Maxwell Lord has returned to the living, and I don’t know if we’ll ever really see this moment referenced again, but it sure was referenced a LOT over the last six years, so I guess it is worth being up there for you to vote on! Greg Rucka and Rags Morales show Wonder Woman determining that the only way to stop Maxwell Lord for good is to end his life.
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Moment 46. Terra reveals herself (Tales of the Teen Titans #42)

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After a number of months of being slowly absorbed on to the team, Terra finally gains the full trust of the Titans by taking on one of their deadliest enemies, Deathstroke the Terminator, one on one! However, we soon learn that the battle was not as “real” as it seemed….

(Thanks to John Trumbull for reminding me I had the wrong issue number initially for this moment)
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Moment 47. Bruce Wayne loses a window, gains an identity (Detective Comics #33)

Batman’s origin is so awesome that it actually merits TWO moments – his parents getting shot and then later, the idea for naming himself after a bat. Bill Finger, Bob Kane and Sheldon Moldoff deliver the tale.
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Moment 48. Herr Starr finds that getting ahead is not always a good thing (Preacher #27)

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As the series went on, Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon (who had already had Herr Star sodomized and had his ear blown off) would subject Herr Starr to a great deal of indignities, to all of which he would reply with some variation of a pause and then “shit.” But his discovery that Jesse Custer had left his head looking like a penis was the first and most notable of them all.
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Moment 49. The Legion mess with Superboy a bit (Adventure Comics #247)

Otto Binder and Al Plastino give us the iconic introduction of the Legion, as they mess with Superboy’s head a bit.
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Moment 50. Doom Patrol is defiant until the end (Doom Patrol #121)

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Arnold Drake and Bruno Premiani make comic book history by having the Doom Patrol sacrifice their lives in exchange for a small fishing village. Killing off all the characters in a book was not something you would see every day!
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Moment 51. Heads roll as Superboy Prime gets mad (Infinite Crisis #4)

Geoff Johns and Phil Jimenez definitely got everybody’s attention when Superboy Prime, who, to this point, could be seen as almost well-meaning, went a whoooooooooole other direction when the Teen Titans gather together to fight him. The next page is even more bloody, but this initial punch of Pantha’s head is the moment everyone remembers.
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Moment 52. Swamp Thing makes a discovery (Saga of the Swamp Thing #21)

Alan Moore, Stephen Bissette and John Totleben quickly made a name for themselves in this dramatic reveal that Swamp Thing was not, in fact, a transformed Alec Holland, but a mutated plant creature that THOUGHT it was Alec Holland. A true game-changer.
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Moment 53. Three young people find a calling (Superboy #147)

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E. Nelson Bridwell and Pete Costanza deliver the iconic origin of the Legion of Super-Heroes. It is pretty weird that it took a decade before the Legion even HAD an origin, but it’s stuck ever since!
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Moment 54. Coast City is destroyed (Superman Vol. 2 #80)

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Dan Jurgens steps up the Reign of the Supermen by revealing that the Cyborg Superman is actually a VILLAIN working with the alien despot, Mongul! He demonstrates this in dramatic fashion when he and Mongul destroy Hal Jordan’s home of Coast City!
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Moment 55. Joker shoots Barbara Gordon (Batman: The Killing Joke)

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You don’t get much more shocking than the sight of the former heroine known as Batgirl getting shot in the gut by the Joker in front of her father, Commissioner Gordon. You don’t have to LIKE the scene to appreciate that it has become etched in the memories of fans everywhere. Alan Moore wrote it and Brian Bolland drew it.
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Moment 56. Superman returns (Kingdom Come #1)

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At the end of the first issue of Kingdom Come (by Mark Waid and Alex Ross), after a long time in self-imposed exile, Superman is lured back to the mainstream world to help curb an infestation of “modern” superheroes. Little does he know that his return is going to set the world down a path that might lead to the annihilation of everyone!
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Moment 57. Batman and Joker share a laugh (Batman: The Killing Joke)

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While quite a few folks were put off by Joker shooting Barbara Gordon in the Killing Joke – the end of the book (written by Alan Moore and drawn by Brian Bolland) was possibly even MORE divisive! The two men standing in the rain laughing at a silly joke is intentionally provocative, but certainly memorable.
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Moment 58. Doctor Erdel reached out and touched someone (Detective Comics #225)

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Joe Samachson and Joe Certa deliver the iconic origin of the Manhunter from Mars!!
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Moment 59. Aquaman loses a hand (Aquaman Vol. 3 #2)

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The villain Charybdis is taken down by Aquaman and Dolphin, but not before he (using powers he stole from Aquaman) compels a group of piranhas to destroy Aquaman’s hand. The issue was written by Peter David and drawn by Martin Egeland.
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Moment 60. The Justice Society of America has their first meeting (All-Star Comics #3)

Gardner Fox and Everett Hibbard deliver the first meeting of the Justice Society of America. The early meetings were just framing sequences to cover up the fact that All-Star Comics basically remained the same anthology it was before. To wit, in the first issue, the meeting just sets up Johnny Thunder asking each member of the team to tell a story, and they do so, with each story naturally being the story that would have appeared in the issue had they not all been on a team. Still, the first meeting of a superhero team was a BIG deal!
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Moment 61. Frank Miller adds a little extra to Batman’s origin (Batman: The Dark Knight #1)

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This moment from the first issue of Frank Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight series features Batman being compelled to return to the streets while he watches the news and hears of horrors that remind him of the fateful night that his parents were killed. Miller added the striking visual of Martha Wayne’s pearls being broken during the ruckus that led to the death of Bruce’s parents, and that visual has become a key element of pretty much all future re-tellings of the origin, a rarity for origin re-tellings (to have that much of a permanent effect on the origin).
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Moment 62. The very first “Bwah Ha Ha” (Justice League International #8)

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The Justice League became “International” in issue #7, so in #8 (written by Keith Giffen and JM DeMatteis and penciled by Kevin Maguire) they began setting up embassies in different International cities. Blue Beetle, Booster Gold And Black Canary were in charge of the Paris branch. While getting lunch in their civilian identities, Beetle and Booster encounter a striking woman who Booster tries to pick up – when he fails miserably, we soon get the most famous laugh in DC history (only because Joker’s laughs aren’t consistent).
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Moment 63. Johnny Cloud avenges his friends (DC Universe: The New Frontier #1)

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The Losers are sent on a mission and end up on Dinosaur Island in this opening to Darwyn Cooke’s acclaimed New Frontier series (telling the origin of the Silver Age from a different perspective). They get picked off one by one until only Johnny Cloud remains. His final act of heroism is incredibly striking. I was unsure if I was going to go with this one, but when three different people I was talking to about the moments suggested this moment unprompted, I figured it had to be here.
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Moment 64. Dr. Manhattan silences Rorschach (Watchmen #12)

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Besides the sheer drama of having Dr. Manhattan be forced to kill Rorschach to keep him from revealing what Ozymandias did to achieve world peace, how awesome is it that Manhattan effectively explodes Rorschach into a bloody Rorschach drawing?!? Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons are deeeeeep.
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Moment 65. Sue Dibny is killed (Identity Crisis #1)

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Brad Meltzer and Rags Morales opened their popular mini-series, Identity Crisis, with the death of Sue Dibny, wife of the longtime Justice Leaguer, Elongated Man.
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Moment 66. Batman strikes a pose (Batman #251)

From the pages of one of the most famous Denny O’Neil/Neal Adams issues of Batman, the Joker’s Five-Way Revenge, we get this full page splash of Batman racing across the beach to catch the Joker. This picture was so memorable that it was turned into a cover just a few years later for a Treasury Edition. John Cassaday later homaged it in his Planetary/Batman crossover – it’s THAT recognizable of a shot that just drawing Batman in that pose will make people realize what Adams drawing you’re talking about.
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Moment 67. The “slow walk” (New Frontier #6)

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The “slow walk” is a classic in movie-making, but never was it so well translated into comics as it was in the finale of Darwyn Cooke’s classic mini-series, New Frontier.
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Moment 68. Batman takes down Superman (Batman: The Dark Knight #4)

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The beginning of this fight (courtesy of Frank Miller) is also quite memorable, where Batman punches Superman, but the ending is the most memorable part of the fight.
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Moment 69. Superman wrestles an angel (JLA #7)

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I think Flash says it best in the pages above (the issue, written by Grant Morrison and drawn by Howard Porter, features an evil angel coming to Earth to keep another angel from spilling his plans to attack Heaven).
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Moment 70. Sue Dibny is raped (Identity Crisis #2)

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Brad Meltzer (along with artist Rags Morales) felt that they needed to have something awfully bad happen to compel the Justice League to actually mess with a supervillain’s mind. What he came up with was having Doctor Light rape Sue Dibny years ago when Elongated Man was a member of the “satellite era” of the Justice League of America.
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Moment 71. Superman races the Flash (Superman #199)

Jim Shooter and Curt Swan give us the race everyone was waiting for!
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Moment 72. Batman tells us who he is (All Star Batman and Robin #2)

Frank Miller and Jim Lee deliver an extremely memorable line.
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Moment 73. Rorschach enjoys prison life (Watchmen #6)

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Outside of the “35 minutes” line, probably the most famous quote from Watchmen.
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Moment 74. Captain Marvel saves the day…kinda (Kingdom Come #4)

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That is one dramatic scene from Mark Waid and Alex Ross.
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Moment 75. The Red Hood takes off the hood (Batman: The Killing Joke)

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Alan Moore and Brian Bolland, particularly Bolland, deliver one of the most iconic Joker panels ever.
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Moment 76. Batman…lives! (Batman: The Dark Knight #4)

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Frank Miller ends the Dark Knight Returns with a wink. A very cool wink.
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Moment 77. “One Punch!” (Justice League #5)

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For the first few issues of the Justice League relaunch by Keith Giffen, JM DeMatteis and Kevin Maguire, Guy Gardner had been giving Batman a hard time. In this famous scene, Gardner finally gets what’s coming to him.
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Moment 78. Jason Todd is beaten nearly to death by the Joker (Batman #427)

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This is one depressing moment, courtesy of Jim Starlin and Jim Aparo. Jason Todd is looking for his mother, but she sells him out and he is beaten nearly to death by the Joker. His mother is then betrayed by the Joker and left with the nearly dead Jason. He manages to awake and struggle to get them both to safety, but the bomb goes off before they can make their escape.
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Moment 79. The Justice League and the Justice Society meet for the first time! (Justice League of America Volume 1 #21)

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In this famous issue, by Gardner Fox and Mike Sekowsky, the two famous DC superhero teams meet for the first time!
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Moment 80. Bane breaks Batman’s back (Batman #497)

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Doug Moench and Jim Aparo deliver what is effectively the climax of Knightfall in this tragic tale.
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Moment 81. Batman accepts a new Robin (Batman #442)

Tim Drake made his debut in the Lonely Place of Dying and quickly stood out from the previous Robin, Jason Todd. This Robin, Tim Drake, was clever, intelligent and very respectful to not only Batman, but to Dick Grayson, as well. So when Batman concedes the point that maybe he DOES need a Robin above, Dick’s smile says it all.
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Moment 82. Our introduction to Watchmen (Watchmen #1)

Our introduction to Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen comes from Rorschach’s somewhat chilling narration as we open the book and see right off the bat that the world of the Watchmen is not a very pleasant place…

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Moment 83. It ends with a wink (Action Comics #583)

Lois Lane has been telling a reporter the story of the last days of Superman, and her husband Jordan has been home for most of it. The story ends with Jordan (and writer Alan Moore and penciler Curt Swan) letting us in on who he REALLY is…

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Moment 84. Joker’s first victim appears (Batman #1)

Joker’s trademark way of killing people, with their faces stretched into a disgusting grin as they die, is probably the most iconic method of killing people of all supervillains, and it made its debut right here, in a story by Bill Finger, Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson.
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Moment 85. Superman flies into the sun to save it (All Star Superman #12)

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Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely conclude their 12-issue epic series with a dying Superman flying into the sun to save it…after having a nice goodbye scene with Lois, of course.
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Moment 86. Animal Man can see you! (Animal Man #19)

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Grant Morrison and Chas Truog got meta when they had Animal Man surprise the reader by revealing that he could see you!!! From this point on in the series, Animal Man was very much a work of metafiction, and one of the more popular and more blatant examples of metafiction in comics.
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Moment 87. Batman summons the bats (Batman #406)

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One of the most famous sequences in Batman: Year One, by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli, is when Batman is surrounded by Gotham’s SWAT team in a rundown building. Batman takes them down one by one until he needs one last big gambit, and it involved using a device to call a ton of bats to his aid (the scene was later roughly used in Batman Begins)
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Moment 88. Lex Luthor refuses to believe Superman is Clark Kent (Superman #2)

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This dramatic twist early in John Byrne’s Superman run gave us a very good insight into the mind of Lex Luthor – he cannot fathom someone NOT using their power all the time, so how could Superman be that weakling Clark Kent?!? Clever ending by Byrne, and certainly a striking ending.
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Moment 89. Lucifer locks up hell and gives Morpheus the key (Sandman #23)

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In this stunning scene from Sandman: Season of Mists, Lucifer quits being in charge of hell, and hands over the empty gates of hell to Morpheus, in what I suppose you would best call “the long con,” as he knows it can bring Morpheus nothing but trouble.
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Moment 90. Batman scares Gotham’s elite (Batman #405)

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This is basically Batman’s BIG debut, when suddenly all of Gotham begins to take him seriously. Miller and Mazzucchelli frame the scene beautifully.
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Moment 91. The opening page of Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow (Superman #423)

Alan Moore delivers one of the coolest opening lines to a comic book story ever.
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Moment 92. Krypto dies (Action Comics #583)

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In one of a number of dramatic sacrifices, Krypto kills the Kryptonite Man to protect his master, and the Kryptonite Man dies stunned, as he can’t fathom how anyone, let alone a dog, would be willing to die to save someone else.
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Moment 93. Superman holds “Batman’s” corpse (Final Crisis #6)

Grant Morrison and Doug Mahnke certainly deliver on a dramatic image in the penultimate chapter of Final Crisis!
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Moment 94. Hal Jordan becomes Parallax (Green Lantern Vol. 3 #50)

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Hal Jordan is convinced that he can use the power of the Green Lantern battery to fix the destruction of Coast City. And if he has to kill a few people along the way, it does not really matter, since he’ll just fix THEM later, too. Ron Marz and Daryl Banks show him reach the final stage where he destroys the giant battery and becomes something new…Parallax!
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Moment 95. Mogo is revealed (Green Lantern Vol. 2 #188)

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In this back-up in Green Lantern #188 by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, a bounty hunter heads off to kill the mysterious Green Lantern Mogo. Well, halfway into his mission, he is checking out maps and realizes that those odd bits of scenery are something else entirely…
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Moment 96. Superman expresses his emotions in the midst of the tragedy around him (Superman #423)

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Things look bleak for Superman. He has brought all of his closest friends to the Fortress of Solitude, but he realizes that all of his most dangerous villains are now even MORE dangerous, and they’re all about to lay siege to his Fortress. Meanwhile, the Legion of Super-Heroes have come to visit, along with Supergirl, who is along with the Legion from a trip she made to the future BEFORE she died, so seeing his dead cousin, on top of the CURRENT problems he has are all a bit too much for Superman to handle, so he takes one moment to let it all out (with his dog by his side). Beautifully written by Alan Moore, and Curt Swan sure drew it well.
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Moment 97. The Atom and Green Arrow take out Darkseid (JLA #14)

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The major plot point of Rock of Ages by Grant Morrison and Howard Porter (plus a bunch of other artists) is avoiding a future where Darkseid takes over Earth. We get to see that future, and it is awful, but a ragtag team of Justice Leaguers have managed to assault Darkseid in his own home base, but as they get picked off one by one, can the Atom and Green Arrow really stand alone against Darkseid!?!?
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Moment 98. Darkseid and Batman trade blows (Final Crisis #6)

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Batman begins the downfall of Darkseid by shooting him with the same bullet Darkseid used to kill Orion earlier in Final Crisis, but Darkseid gets off one last blast of his Omega Beams, so Batman’s success is short-lived, as seen in this dramatic sequence by Grant Morrison and JG Jones.
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Moment 99. 1 of We3 opines on the meaning of “home” (We3 #2)

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The cybernetic assassins of We3 are running away from the government trying to get “home.” They just were involved in a massive train wreck. The leader of the group, the dog, 1, tries to save a human victim, to no avail. The rabbit, 3, is missing, and the cat, 2, thinks 1′s plan of going “home” is idiotic. In fact, 2 doubts that 1 even knows what “home” IS! 1 shows him otherwise, in this beautiful scene from Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely.
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Moment 100. Superman dies (Superman Vol. 2 #75)

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Dan Jurgens provides one of the most dramatic images of the 1990s in comics.
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Those are the choices, here is the poll! Remember, vote for as many choices as you’d like! If you want to vote for all 100, vote for all 100! Whatever you think is memorable! When the votes are done next week, we’ll see which moments are seen as memorable to the most people and that will be our list that I’ll count down next week!

Have fun voting!

118 Comments

Without Superman’s first moment all the other moments wouldn’t have happened.

i seriously don’t understand how the death of ampersand and jesse & tulip riding off into the sunset didn’t make the final cut. these were perfect endings to two of the most acclaimed and successful series of the last 20 years, and even in the comments of the voting post, it seemed that they had heavy support. sigh.

it is interesting that of the 18 moments decided by vote, 15 of those 18 were written by either alan moore, grant morrison, frank miller, or neil gaiman, who are often, in some order, considered the four greatest writers in comics history. moore and morrison accounted for six each (33%) of the 18 voted on moments.

but brian, i have to express a little bit of disapproval that when showing the opening moment of whatever happened to the man of tomorrow, you showed the hardcover version instead of the way it appeared in the original issue, with the gold superman statue by swan and perez. just as people argued with the re-colored version of the killing joke, i think these memorable moments should be shown in the way they match our memories.

otherwise, great job with this whole list, it’s been a lot of fun, and i’m looking forward to how the results turn out. for me, the greatest and most memorable moment in all of comics history (not just dc) is ozymandias’s “i did it 35 minutes ago” admission, so i hope that comes out pretty high.

Ampersand came close (it was 20th and 355′s death was 21st, or maybe it was the other way around…)! Tulip and Jesse, not so much.

I’m with Doug.

With all due respect, I don’t see how anything but the Death of Superman could be #1. It was such a huge event when it happened. Radio stations played “Superman’s Song” by Crash Test Dummies repeatedly, the writers of the Superman books (Dan Jurgens, Louise Simonson, etc.) were all over tv (I remember seeing Louise Simonson being interviewed by Entertainment Tonight and thinking how surreal it was to see a comic book writer considered a celebrity). It was a moment that even people who don’t read comics remember. A friend of mine in college saw a news item on tv talking about the “Electric Blue” Superman a few years after and I remember him saying “Isn’t Superman dead?”. Superman was such a cultural icon that his death was the first comic book story to gain the attention of the media and people who otherwise wouldn’t have given a damn about comics. It started the comic book “boom” in the 90s and made people notice comics again (Hollywood, especially).

The lack of Return of Barry Allen is a real shame. I’m stunned that it didn’t make it.

90 would be a more impressive moment if we hadn’t just been told that Batman soiled himself at the time…

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

Moments I would have liked to see on the list:

Firestorm’s 1st fusion into the Nuclear Man

The wedding of Aquaman and Mera

Projectra’s execution of Nemesis Kid

Black Lightning’s 1st appearance

Power Girl’s introduction to the DCU

RISE/LIVE scenes from Blackest Night

Helena Wayne’s debut as the Huntress

Kid Flash discovering Raven’s true nature after being enveloped in her soul self

Moments #82-99, Joe, were determined by reader vote. A few of those moments you mentioned were options that did not make the final cut.

Click here to see the moments that were voted on (both Blackest Night moments were options).

Not of all Aquaman’s memorable moments involved death or maiming. First hero to get married, first to have a son, first to unofficially crossover with a Marvel character (Aquaman #56/Sub-Mariner #72), Aquaman taking control of the JLA, etc.

In retrospect, I wish I’d nominated (and that we’d gotten to vote on) two BIrds of Prey moments. They’re back from Dixon’s run, and although I think Simone’s the best (and most definitive) writer that title’s ever had, as this list proves, so often the most memorable moments in characters’ histories are the early ones. So I wish we’d remembered Oracle’s reveal, several years into Birds of Prey, of her identity to Black Canary. It wouldn’t have made the cut, but it was a great storyline and a great payoff to what had been a very different relationship.

Hmm … for that matter, the reveal of Oracle to all of us readers would also have been a great moment. That was a subplot through a number of DCU comics for a year or two. John Ostrander really rescued a character to whom Moore did seemingly permanent damage, and he did it without resorting to a retcon.

The other BOP moment I’m thinking of is Dick Grayson taking Barbara for an aerial spin on a date.

In any event: Still a fine list, if it’s a bit too heavy on a few particular writers and storylines. I’m looking forward to the voting.

Will there be a similair “most memorable moments” feature for Marvel as well? I’d love to see that since I’m more of a marvel-guy myself.

For you, third man, I’ll change the Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow moment!

what an awesome list. Brian, thank you. That was a joy to read. Especially seeing Herr Starr. Wow. That was fun. Constantine giving the Finger. I feel “listened to” as well…you nailed my Big DC Moments! Thanks! Word to Phil Jimenez…that look on Prime’s face, the horror and shock of the blood-stained hands…magnificent but iDigress…
John Stewart’s eyes!!! Wow!

Brian, may I suggest an Honorable Mention list of the chorus of “Missed Moments”?
My addition would be 1970′s “I am Curious (Black)!” from Lois Lane, Superman’s girlfriend comic of the Silver Age. That is by definition a very memorable DC Moment. May it get the same flak that the O’Neil/Adams GL/GA racial tension moment had…the titles were contemporaries. It was about an uncomfortable subject in the space/time of its initial release. We judge it ironically enough with bias. It was radical and a “practical” application of Superman’s skill set. I remember that one.

crea shaakti,
Rev Sully

Eric O’Sullivan
Boston, MA

Moment 12, the introduction of Nightwing, doesn’t seem to be listed on the poll.

[...] Infinite Crisis, Superboy Prime Killing Spree This is a list that I only wish I could come up with. Comic Book Resources has complied a list of the 100 of the most memorable moments in the history of DC Comics and we [...]

Oops, sorry, JR! I’ll give it the same amount of votes that the #70 choice had received so far. If that’s not enough to keep it in the Top 75, it surely would not have gotten there anyways.

Oh reader votes, you’ll disappoint me every time. While there’s some great stuff on there, some stories are way represented way too much. There’s hardly a flip of a page between bare-chested Batman moments! Couldn’t they all have been classified as one and the same? Not that I begrudge anyone having their favorite sub-moments, but it necessarily takes away from the full scope a list like this should have, in terms of tone, characters and era.

The necessary evil of this type of list means it must unfortunately showcase the memorable moments I would rather forget, like the rape of Sue Dibny, the fridge moment and the rolling head of Pantha, which are rather more infamous than famous. But as I do remember them, they deserve to be there. Sigh.

@Doug Nelson: Doesn’t make it the most memorable. I remember the cover of Action more than the first page. Sure, the story is memorable but is that particular presentation of it the memorable one?

#1 is the logical choice.

Great list, but I would have really liked to see the moment that Deathstroke took out the Justice League in Identity Crisis # 3 or when Dr. Light remembers what they did to him from that very same issue.

The list has too many neal adams Batman moments on it. I mean, do we really need two moments(that I didn’t find memorable at all) on one page?

Try adding Oliver queen sacrifices his life from Green arrow 100 to the list.

Or Kyle Rayner’s life gets more complicated when he gets a GL ring from green lantern(series 2 50)

Those are two worthy moments that aren’t on the list. We don’t need umpteen Watchmen or Dark knight scenes either. yes, They were great series, but this starting list looks like someones vanity list of favorites, and has too many watchmen, Neal Adams, and dark knight to truly be a true indicator of memorable moments.
What about Ralph Dibney gets killed in 52? Or geo-force puts sword through Deathstroke in last will and testament?

I guess one problem with a list like this (and trying to attempt one myself just as an exercise-not-for-publication, I can vouch for it) is that “memorable” means there are fewer older moments and more recent moments. However, the older moments have a more secure position (i.e. they really are memorable, not just remembered) while more recent offerings may pass into obscurity in a few years.

If this list were written in 1988, for example, I’m sure we’d have loads of moments from Millennium (Manhunter reveals and such) and Invasion.

But I agree jagruger, there are actually TWO moments that are the same moment: Crime Alley. Sure, it’s different telling, but still the same moment. I think Miller’s pearl version has (thanks to the 89 movie) replaced the original in most minds, so I’d keep that one, but that one alone.

I amazed at how many LSH moments there are. It’s a good thing.

I’m a Batman fan @ heart and even I know that “the Death of Superman” is the most memorable moment of ALL TIME! It surpassed the comics. It was on CNN for goodness sakes! Before I even read the issue I saw the actual funeral TV. If this moment ain’t the most memorable then the whole list is invalid.

Other wise so far, great list, Brian!

Two, definitely. With a little sixteen on the side.

People had a chance to put Kyle getting the ring on to the list. They chose not to.

As for Green Arrow’s “death,” that’s not even the most memorable Green Arrow moment to NOT make the list. That story was never even collected into a trade.

Dozens of Westerns and dozens of War comics, many that spanned decades, and only one moment from them all. Sheesh.

At least Horror is well represented.

Nice compilation, I enjoyed reading all the moments I hadn’t read before and rereading the moments I got to experience in my own comics before.

all hard choices to pick for the final ones. a few of them showing how bad batman is and how nasty the joker is. plus the few that showed how dark the dc universe has become. not to mention the death of super man needed to make the list mostly because one never though dc would kill their number one big gun.

It’s a shame, Mutt, but there really isn’t a stand-out Sgt. Rock moment or a Tomahaw moment, etc. Heck, look at Haunted Tank, Kanigher practically did the OPPOSITE of memorable – each story was basically the same (Kanigher was just such an impressive writer that they were all good).

@Chad: And they actually didn’t.

Nothing from Transmetropolitan eh? I just noticed that for the first time, but it’s a bit disappointing.

Clegane, Sandor

August 1, 2010 at 3:30 pm

Death of Superman was a big deal. In 1993. To suggest it’s somehow the BIGGEST event EVAH – bigger than the origins of Superman, Batman, Flash or Green Lantern – is a little silly, guys. DC has 75 years of history. It’s a bit sad so many readers are only familiar with the big events of the last 15-20 years. Despite the internet, books on the subject, and more.

Anyway,. the list is very nice, but that’s an issue – a lot of nice, memorable but ultimately unimportant moments. Such as the first Bwah-ha-ha, the One-punch, Lex disregarding Kent as a likely Superman, Cosmic Oddyssey, and so on. And there are lots of important moments that were left off for these inconsequential bits:

1. Night of the Stalker. The Englehart / Adams / Amendola story that inspired the 1989 Batman film.

2. The Laughing Fish – Detective # 475-6, by Englehart & Rogers, which also influenced the 1989 Batman flick.

3. Green Lantern: Rebirth. The return of Hal Jordan AND sinestro.

4. Superman Vs. Muhammad Ali. C’mon; probably the greatest comic of the 1970s isn’t even MENTIONED?

5. The death of Iris Allen. Flash 275 was a HUGE moment in DC and Flash history, as it led to the Death of Prof. Zoom, the trial of the Flash, and setting the pace for Flash to be killed off in Crisis.

6. Tales of the Green lantern Corps (1981) – perhaps the most important GL mythology story told.

7. Aquaman disbands the JLA – Aquaman singlehandedly makes the JLA suck by disbanding the Satellite League and creating the ill-fated Detroit version.

8. Green Arrow hooking up with Black Canary in JLA and Green Lantern.

9. The first Superman/Batman team-up, which became a running feature in World’s Finest for DECADES (and runs via Superman/Batman to this day).

10. The beginning of the Flash-Green Lantern team-up tradition in 1961.

While I agree with you wholeheartedly on the memorability of the moment, Brian, I’d caution against using whether or not something has had a collected edition as a barometer for how memorable or impressive a story beat was. Great swathes of time have simply never been collected.

Great list, really took me down memory lane. I did kind of a tribute on my blog today.

http://continuedon2ndpagefollowing.blogspot.com/2010/08/10-moments-in-dc-history-that-you-wont.html

Clegane, Sandor
August 1, 2010 at 3:30 pm

“Death of Superman was a big deal. In 1993. To suggest it’s somehow the BIGGEST event EVAH – bigger than the origins of Superman, Batman, Flash or Green Lantern – is a little silly”

How? Casual, ordinary people that don’t even touch comics remember this. No one besides comic fans actually remember the origins of any of those characters you named.

@nikki:Fair enough. I guess I was thinking of moments that were the most significant rather than memorable.
In truth I guess the death of Barry Allen does sticks out to me. Probably because I actually do remember it since I was a kid at the time and it did surprise me. All the news was about Supergirl’s impending demise so I knew that was coming but not The Flash. Plus his death story was better maybe because he died alone.
I can also see the argument of Superman’s death being the most memorable even though it was only a gimmick. People who hadn’t looked at a comic in thirty years knew about it. However it can also be said of someone who hasn’t read a comic in thirty years knows the first Superman story and it was first in Action#1.

So without Action#1 I doubt there would be a DC comics.

Clegane, Sandor
August 1, 2010 at 3:30 pm

Anyway,. the list is very nice, but that’s an issue – a lot of nice, memorable but ultimately unimportant moments. Such as the first Bwah-ha-ha, the One-punch, Lex disregarding Kent as a likely Superman, Cosmic Oddyssey, and so on. And there are lots of important moments that were left off for these inconsequential bits:

1. Night of the Stalker. The Englehart / Adams / Amendola story that inspired the 1989 Batman film.

2. The Laughing Fish – Detective # 475-6, by Englehart & Rogers, which also influenced the 1989 Batman flick.

3. Green Lantern: Rebirth. The return of Hal Jordan AND sinestro.

4. Superman Vs. Muhammad Ali. C’mon; probably the greatest comic of the 1970s isn’t even MENTIONED?

5. The death of Iris Allen. Flash 275 was a HUGE moment in DC and Flash history, as it led to the Death of Prof. Zoom, the trial of the Flash, and setting the pace for Flash to be killed off in Crisis.

6. Tales of the Green lantern Corps (1981) – perhaps the most important GL mythology story told.

7. Aquaman disbands the JLA – Aquaman singlehandedly makes the JLA suck by disbanding the Satellite League and creating the ill-fated Detroit version.

8. Green Arrow hooking up with Black Canary in JLA and Green Lantern.

9. The first Superman/Batman team-up, which became a running feature in World’s Finest for DECADES (and runs via Superman/Batman to this day).

10. The beginning of the Flash-Green Lantern team-up tradition in 1961.

After reading the list above I can see that Brian’s list is VERY flawed. #4 alone can replace a few of these as most memorable. That guy leaping into the dinosaur is nothing compared to Supes vs Ali. The first Bwahaha doesn’t match up to the Laughing Fish. The Worlds Finest first team up trumps Cosmic Odyssey.

Is it too late for you to switch some moments out, Brian?

Brian, there´s no number 12 listed!! And number 70 has nothing to do with it!!
I´ll vote when you include it!!
Other than that, good job

Oh man, I forgot to mention my favorite Batman moment when I made my suggestions: BATMAN SAVING THE LIVES OF HIS PARENTS!! Yes, this actually happened. OK, it was in a parallel universe (where Bats was sent to by the Phantom Stranger) but still! Made even more controversial by the implication that by saving another Bruce Wayne’s parents he was preventing a Batman from ever being in that otherwise superhero-less world. (It turns out that he DID become Batman, inspired by the one who saved his parents- but our Bruce never found that out!) As far as I know, this is the only story where such a feat ever happened.

I cannot wait until we can put in our own. How about:

1) Triplicate Girl becomes Duo Damsel.
2) Kamandi leaves Chicago.
3) The Glory Boat from the New Gods
4) The Pact from the New Gods where Highfather renounces the ways of war.
5) Mon-El gets lead poisoning and is sent to the Phantom Zone for 10,000 years.

So much history to choose from.

I almost forgot:

6) A martian is kidnapped to earth.
7) A teen is elected President of the United States.

Brian, there´s no number 12 listed!! And number 70 has nothing to do with it!!
I´ll vote when you include it!!
Other than that, good job

It’s listed at the end.

I mentioned 70 only to say that I would be giving #12 the amount of votes of the moment that had the 70th most votes at the time (whatever that was), to give it a fair chance at making the Top 75.

Opps my bad the Martian was covered:

Instead how about:

7) Merry Man meets the Inferior Five for the First time.

While I agree with you wholeheartedly on the memorability of the moment, Brian, I’d caution against using whether or not something has had a collected edition as a barometer for how memorable or impressive a story beat was. Great swathes of time have simply never been collected.

It’s all in context, Russ. If an 80s/90s comic was collected, it IS a sign that the comic was notable, because so few of them have been.

People had a chance to vote in a number of those moments- they chose not to. Superman/Batman’s first team up didn’t even get 40 votes.

…Two points regarding the Cosmic Odyssey moment:

1) IIRC, the fat “comic book guy” who painted the bomb yellow was supposed to be Andy Helfer. At least that’s what was in the trade rags at the time, according to some Starlin and Mignola interviews.

2) This is actually considered not a defining moment, but a whining moment for John, who’s been whining about this moment ever since it happened. It would have served the character and his fans a lot better if Cosmic Excrement had been retconned out of existence in all the reboots DC has had since Crisis on Infinite Earths.

It’s a shame, Mutt, but there really isn’t a stand-out Sgt. Rock moment or a Tomahaw moment, etc. Heck, look at Haunted Tank, Kanigher practically did the OPPOSITE of memorable – each story was basically the same (Kanigher was just such an impressive writer that they were all good).

I thought about suggesting Schatzki’s death in Enemy Ace just to mention a War comic somewhere (that’s probably the most memorable Enemy Ace moment.) But I’d be shocked if that got more than a handful of votes in the vote in poll.

(I do have minor quibbles with the list; I’d leave off the Superman Red/Blue moment and Batman shoots a vampire if I had the choice.)

This is an awesome list – thanks for all the effort that has gone into putting it together!

It’s great just slowly scrolling through and tripping through DC’s history. I love that the Neal Adams ‘Batman on sand’ made it into the running (no pun intended). Easily one of the best Caped Crusader images ever.

Look forward to see who the crowd picks!

Death of Shatzi.
Destruction of the original Haunted Tank.
Sgt. Rock beats a squad of Nazis to death with an ammo belt.
Jackie Johnson joins Easy Co.
Unknown Soldier in Hitler’s bunker.

I guess you had to be there.

I feel like people are misinterpreting the concept of “memorable.” The first appearances of characters like Superman, Flash, Green Lantern, Robin, and the Legion of Super-Heroes are undoubtedly extremely important, and perhaps even iconic moments, but they don’t exactly fit the concept of memorable. Something can only be memorable if it happens within the context of things we have a vested interest in.

For example, when a character that we like dies, it’s memorable, because it changed the status quo of something we cared about. If you had been reading Grant Morrison’s Animal Man run when it was coming out, and you were really into it, then when he meets Grant Morrison in the penultimate issue, it’s extremely memorable, because there was a build-up to that moment. same with one punch, from the Giffen/Dematteis JLI, Ozymandias’s reveal of “35 minutes ago” at the end of Watchmen, Dick Grayson’s transformation into Nightwing, Swamp Thing and Abby boning, Roy Harper shooting up, Terra working with Deathstroke, Aquaman losing his hand, etc. All of these moments truly meant something to those characters and to the people following them, because they forever altered an established dynamic with established fans. Even if you disliked the moment due to how it was handled or due to the direction it took your favorite characters in, at the very least, you’d remember the moment.

And in another category, some moments can be extremely memorable simply because of how bad-ass they are, like Batman saying “ready when you are” to the white martians, Superman wrestling an angel or saying “burn” to Mongul, Constantine flipping off the lords of hell, and Brian Bolland’s insanely killer image of the Joker emerging from his acid swim.

But the first appearance of superman from Action #1, or the debuts of Hal Jordan and Barry Allen from showcase, while undoubtedly important, are only memorable in hindsight. The people reading those comics at the time had no reason to believe they would ever see those characters again, or that they had just read a moment that was in any way revelatory. For a moment in a comic book to be truly memorable, it has to not only stand the test of time, but it has to stand the test of the instant–as in, if you didn’t think “wow” the instant you read it, then it doesn’t count. It’s just revisionist history, to say you knew something mattered at the time, when really you only know that thing mattered by the benefit of historical context.

It’s easy to do a list of the most important moments in DC history. We just pick the most important characters, then list their first appearances. But those aren’t the moments that have stayed in our memory. This list should be about the moments we truly remember, and that’s how I’ll be voting.

…On a side note, I’d like to point out that the list to choose from is a pretty damn concise list, especially with the “Darkseid Reveal” ranking so high in the list. If anything, I’d see the list expanded to include at least three other small-sized but equally as classic moments:

1) The “last punch” the Superman of Earth-2 gives the burning remains of the Anti-Monitor. Even George Perez admitted this one panel should have been done as at least a full-page spread, but “there was so much going on in [Crisis] that we simply didn’t have room to do it.”

2) Cliff Steele’s classic punchline in Grant’s Doom Patrol run, where Mr. Jones gets his comeuppance with something’s happening and you don’t know what it is, do you, Mr. Jones?” That one panel *tripled* the number of subscription pull lists reserving this book at the LCS I worked for at the time.

3) New Gods #6, “The Glory Boat”, the two facing full-page splashes where Orion and Lightray reveal the BIG KIRBYTRONIC KOZMIK DOOMSDAY WEAPON to take on the Deep Six and their genetically modified big pink whale-thang. 40 years later, and it still beats the living fuck out of the “best” output from 90% of today’s so-called “top artists”.

I’d just like to dispute third man’s last point a little bit, in that Action #1 and the first appearance of Superman was certainly memorable as well as significant, because the amount of copies sold at that time indicated (to the publisher) this “superhero thing” was pretty big, and as others here have said, without Superman nothing else here would be here. From what I’ve read, Action #1 sold thousands and thousands of copies, and from the marketing push Superman got in the next few months, the publisher knew from the start that it was big. I’d say that’s certainly memorable.

If I could have, I would have voted for the moment in All-Star Superman where he stops the young girl from committing suicide, not the big, flashy finale. It’s in that little moment that series shows it’s big beautiful heart and how it knows just what the character of Superman truly means. More people I know who’ve read that series talk about just that one moment more than any other part of the series.

Other than that tiny omission (and the inclusion of two moments from the crass, poorly written dreck that was Identity Crisis), this is a really thorough, interesting list. Thanks for inspiring discussion and debate.

I’m not sure how so many Watchmen moments gets on here when they don’t really even affect the DC Universe. Neither does the Authority and a whole bunch of other moments are so arbitrary.
Too much Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, Neil Gaiman and Frank Miller. I know these lists have to include a lot of what is considered popular, but this is ridiculous.
This list has some great moments on it, but these aren’t truly the 75-100 greatest moments in DC history.
What about Jonah Hex’s death?
Or the Flash killing the Reverse Flash?
Superman and Lois Lane from Earth 2 getting married?
If you are going to include so much from Grant Morrison, why not at least one moment from his Doom Patrol run?
How about the first appearance of Superboy Prime?
Deadshot killing the Senator so Rick Flag couldn’t?
The Death of the New Gods?
The JSA being sent to fight Ragnarok in a time loop?
The death of JLA Detroit?
There are so many more great moments that have been left off this list simply so that the popular, more current stuff can be placed on here to make the list look more relevant.
It’s really disappointing and definitely not a true list of the 75 greatest moments for which we are supposed to vote.
Why not let the fans nominate some of their picks for greatest moment?

I think some people missed the previous 2 weeks of posts that established this list. People even got to suggest and vote on the last few choices on the list. To be blunt, at this point, this is the list, deal with it.

And Brian has read WAY more comics than you, so his choices are just fine. Although he loves him some Batman 244.

I will say about the moments in comics that I don’t like (Identity Crisis…): they’re certainly memorable, but so is a kidney stone.

I’m guessing it might be pointless to vote more than once?

I don’t think you even can vote more than once.

Really fun poll that made me want to reread some of those excellent classics all over again.

These are my best 14 more epics moments ever:

Moment 11. Joker gets in one last joke (Batman: The Dark Knight #3)

Moment 16. Ozymandias’ plan goes into effect (Watchmen #11)

Moment 31. Blue Beetle is defiant in the face of death (Countdown to Infinite Crisis #1)

Moment 37. Barry Allen makes the ultimate sacrifice to save the Multiverse (Crisis on Infinite Earths #8)

Moment 45. Wonder Woman does not see eye-to-eye on things with Maxwell Lord (Wonder Woman Vol. 2 #219)

Moment 51. Heads roll as Superboy Prime gets mad (Infinite Crisis #4)

Moment 54. Coast City is destroyed (Superman Vol. 2 #80)

Moment 55. Joker shoots Barbara Gordon (Batman: The Killing Joke)

Moment 64. Dr. Manhattan silences Rorschach (Watchmen #12)

Moment 68. Batman takes down Superman (Batman: The Dark Knight #4)

Moment 74. Captain Marvel saves the day…kinda (Kingdom Come #4)

Moment 93. Superman holds “Batman’s” corpse (Final Crisis #6)

Moment 94. Hal Jordan becomes Parallax (Green Lantern Vol. 3 #50)

Moment 98. Darkseid and Batman trade blows (Final Crisis #6)

‘The necessary evil of this type of list means it must unfortunately showcase the memorable moments I would rather forget, like the rape of Sue Dibny, the fridge moment and the rolling head of Pantha, which are rather more infamous than famous. But as I do remember them, they deserve to be there.’
Were those moments really infamous or is the above comment ramblings of a jaded DC fan?

I got two more moments…

When Jason Todd Robin may have or may not have pushed the South American rapist with Diplomatic Immunity off a balcony.
And Flash killing Professor Zoom with the image of Wally Kid Flash West testifying against his mentor in court.

From Dictionary.com:

Infamous:
1.having an extremely bad reputation: an infamous city.
2. deserving of or causing an evil reputation; shamefully malign; detestable: an infamous deed.

If I understand this definition right, the above mentioned moments are indeed infamous.

And since we’re quoting from Siskoid, I’d just like to say that I doubt even in 1988 that moments from Millennium and Invasion would have made the list. I would hope, anyway.

I voted for Jim and Batman’s partnership as being the most defining. I’d have voted for Nightwing, but didn’t think it as definining as when he leaves the Robin identity behind. “I need to find myself. Someone who’s name doesn’t start “Batman and-” I think is the line.

Also I’d nominate “Who is Wonder Girl” from the list, and Donna’s death in Graduation day, but I’m a Titans fan so I’m biased.

If I could have, I would have voted for the moment in All-Star Superman where he stops the young girl from committing suicide, not the big, flashy finale. It’s in that little moment that series shows it’s big beautiful heart and how it knows just what the character of Superman truly means.

Yeah, me too.

GREAT choices. I clicked about 10, though if I had to pick just 1 it would be the group of Legionaires willing risk their lives to save Lightning Lad.

That is the FIRST comic story I can remember reading. I THINK it was an Advnture Comic digest

BTW Brian… a FINE list!

I see (some) people complaining and listing crap like ‘introduction of Ambush Bug’, and ‘death of Dove’ should be on the list.

This list represents the finest most memorable moments in DC’s 75 years. You gotta take into account, these are moments that tend to hit most of our minds when we think of the DCU. I hate Superman and Batman but I understand why they take up most of the list = )

No death of Ampersand.

Huh.

That was the most moving bit of comic storytelling I have ever read.

I thought that was a sure thing.

I understand your argument about ‘memorable’, but with crap like the All Star Batman and the girlfriend in the refrigerator on here but no death of Ampersand…

Well, it is disappointing.

Brian, thanks for putting together this list, but I am very surprised by the dearth of moments featuring female characters. And two that you do include consist of one female character being shot and another being held following her rape. I won’t argue that they aren’t important moments, but given their appearance on the short list of other moments featuring female characters their appearance is unfortunate. With room for three moments featuring Batman vs. Ra’s al Ghul, there must have been a few more moments featuring women that could have been included. I have compiled a list of 11 moments that might have appeared on the list on my blog. On it is at least one moment that should absolutely be on the list – the first appearance of Batgirl in Detective Comics #359.

Rev Sully, I loved both the moments you cited. The Jason Todd moment was the high water mark in the the post-COIE, pre-Death in the Family Jason Todd. Regarding the Flash kills Zoom story, my favorite moment was the one that led to the killing, when Zoom leaves a note carved into the land on which the speedsters are running: “Guess who is going to kill your wife again?”

Moment 13 , where John Stewart arrogantly dooms the plant Xanshi was simply terrible. Green Lantern was completely out of character: Stewart has never behaved this way before or since.

I am glad to see the two Swamp Thing moments-especially the Anatomy Lesson-and of course the Death of my hero Krypto.

Brian, what was the moment that just missed making the list?

Brian, what was the moment that just missed making the list?

Off the top of my head, I believe it was Joe Chill being murdered because his fellow gangsters found out that he was responsible for Batman.

No death of Ampersand.

Huh.

That was the most moving bit of comic storytelling I have ever read.

It had a chance – people didn’t vote for it.

Brian, thanks for putting together this list, but I am very surprised by the dearth of moments featuring female characters.

Well, there’s certainly a problem, agreed. I just think it’s more of a problem with the DC stories featuring women than with the moments chosen.

@Third Man –

Disagree. You may be correct as to the precise meaning of “memorable,” but that would automatically restrict the list to recent moments. I suspect few people voting here have read Superman and Batman’s first appearances when they were released.

If we’re going to quibble about what is “memorable,” then I think Brian Cronin should just change the wording to “Important.”

To me, “memorable” means a lot more than my own reactions to the event, I consider instead if the moment has often been replicated in other stories, alluded to, discussed, criticized, satired, and inspired. If yes, that is a memorable moment, it is stuck in the collective mind of comic book fandom and creators.

You say we could just get the origins of the 75 most important characters, but I don’t think there are any particular moments in the origins of Aquaman, Hawkman, Firestorm, Alan Scott, Jay Garrick, and many other important characters that are often replicated and alluded to, even though those characters are undoubtly important.

Their first appearances may be historically important, but no specific moments stand out. Superman’s rocket speeding away from Krypton, on the other hand, had never been forgotten by anyone familiar with superheroes. That is memorable to me.

Superman’s expression when Wonder Woman kills Max Lord is about the funniest thing in the history of comics…

Well, I voted, trying very hard to honor the “memorable” requirement. Which resulted in a very different list than “famous” or “iconic” would have. Superman’s origin is both famous and iconic, for example- but the version I remember is the Superman #1 version or other retellings, not the Action #1. (Not that I have either in the original, of course- but for a long time the Superman #1 version was reprinted a LOT more often that the Action #1 version.) And even if I gave up on the series around issue #3, I REMEMBER the “Goddamn Batman” line from when I first read it.

Still a wonderful mix of scenes to go over, I look forward to the results. (There are a grand total of four of the 100 moments that I haven’t read, and all four I was quite aware of even if I hadn’t seen the originals.) Thank you for doing this list, even if I disagree with the results the discussion is fun. And, as people have said, it’s a good start on a reading list for a few days…)

So…the only two Wonder Woman-related moments are her origin, and her snapping Max’s neck? The first makes total sense…the second has officially been rendered forgettable…

…and I honestly, objectively feel Phil Jimenez’s depiction of Hippolyta’s death was the best death scene in comicbookdom. It’s a REAL shame it isn’t here.

…and I honestly, objectively feel Phil Jimenez’s depiction of Hippolyta’s death was the best death scene in comicbookdom

Even if you were right, best does not equal memorable.

PLEASE PUT THE ‘WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF TOMORROW’ TITLE PAGE AS YOU ORIGINALLY HAD IT BACK UP, OR LINK TO IT. I’ve wanted to see how it looked in the hardcover for a long time and it’s beyond annoying how you replaced it without leaving the first image. Nobody remembers the original comic anyway, the majority of people have read it in the collected edition. Put the image back or replace the Killing Joke pages with the original as well, that’s a double standard on your part.

It had a chance – people didn’t vote for it.

I never said it was you I was disappointed in, Brian.

Good job, as always.

I never said it was you I was disappointed in, Brian.

Too true, Rusty! My bad.

Annoyed-

The hardcover collected edition of whatever happened to the man of tomorrow has only been out for a year or two, and if you haven’t even seen it, how can you say that’s how most people would have originally seen it? When the original issues (Superman 423 and Action 583) came out, Alan Moore was one of the most popular writers in comics, and he was writing the final story of one of the most popular characters in comics, so I don’t think it’s really accurate to say nobody remembers reading them (the fact that FOUR moments from the two-issue story got voted in proves people remember it pretty damn well). And asking for a “memorable moment” to be different than the way we remember it is like asking for the Superman origin from “52″ instead of the one from Action #1.

It just occurred to me that, not only does Alan Moore have by far the most moments on the list with 16, but, according to this list, the single most memorable trade paperback someone could purchase is “The DC Universe Stories of Alan Moore,” which features a whopping NINE of the top 100 most memorable DC moments (4 from “Whatever Happened to The Man of Tomorrow,” 3 from “The Killing Joke,” 1 from “For the Man Who Has Everything,” and 1 from the Mogo story). And when you think about it, Alan Moore wrote a grand total of just under 75 comics published by DC, whereas guys like Denny O’Neil, Marv Wolfman, Gardner Fox, Geoff Johns, and others might have written close to a thousand DC comics. So the fact that Moore ended up with the most entries on this list (by a substantial margin) speaks a lot for his genius.

There’s definitely something to be said for that, third man, but I think a lot of it just had to do with different eras. In Gardner Fox’s day, “memorable” was not necessarily even a GOOD thing – consistent entertainment was more the key. So you’d have similar stories told over and over again. Fox was such a good writer that he made them all quite good, but if you read, say, Fox’s Justice League run, the stories have a certain sameness to most of them, so that when something DOES stand out, like the JLA/JSA team-up, it REALLY stood out.

Same with his Batman work, same with most of John Broome’s work, same with Robert Kanigher. These were all extremely talented writers, but they weren’t writing from the same approach. I mean, heck, look at Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow, NO writer would ever be ALLOWED to write a two-issue series where they kill off all of the Superman supporting cast and make Superman’s villains vicious killers. No writer from the Silver Age could have the Joker cripple a major Batman supporting cast member.

So I think era has a lot to do with it – the last 30 years or so in DC history has been practically DESIGNED to HAVE stand-out “moments,” which is why there are more from those years.

Nobody remembers the original comic anyway, the majority of people have read it in the collected edition.

I do! And part of the problem with the first page of Whatever Happened To The Man of Tomorrow is that collected editions repeatedly butcher it by separating the text from the image (and, memorably, left it off once!) I think in this case “as it was originally done” is important!

Yeah, while I don’t particularly care about new coloring, I think it’s fair to want to see the original moment when the newer version literally removes images from the original comic. The collected version is an entirely different thing than the original.

Honestly, I don’t see why DC made the change in question for the collection.

I’m sort of non-plussed the lack of variety in this list.

“Even if you were right, best does not equal memorable.”

Well, a nipple slip at a half-time show can be “memorable”…this list seems to run down some of the most memorable and well-written moments. Say what you want about the Our World’s At War nonsense that preceded it – Hippolyta’s actual death scene has gone on to become pretty famous because it was so well written.

:) And what do you mean “IF” I’m right? It’s a stellar moment, deeply touching and a shame Max’s overhyped and totally spoiled death made it up there instead.

Had fun reading through your list though.

Well, I finally voted, for 58 moments in all. I’m sure once the votes are tallied and you show us the countdown, I’ll have more comments, but for now let me make a few.

I voted for some moments here just because they led to memorable things or they were part of something else more memorable (like Jason Todd’s death — not necessarily the death itself, but the hype of the call in number). So I cheated, just a bit. Oh well.

I can’t think of anything in particular to complain about with these moments :) There were a few that seemed to be not necessarily the most memorable moments from the book they were in (All Star Superman). But on the whole it was a good list.

I will say that in at least 2 cases, the cover is more memorable than the interior — Death of Supergirl in COIE 7 and “my ward is a junkie” for GA. But I still voted for them.

There were a couple Wizard features years back that featured “coolest moments ever” or “most memorable moments”, and a couple of these were featured — I’m thinking of the “Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow” and Watchmen moments. They actually spoiled Watchmen for me, and I don’t think they had Spoiler Warnings, dammit!

There are quite a few things I haven’t read yet on this list. (I’m actually going to email you an idea, Brian, as it would probably take this comments way off track, if it’s even read) New Frontier is probably the biggest, most recent thing of the bunch.

There are a couple things that come after the bits shown that are memorable (of course I can only think of one right now, the Joker’s expression after his first kill in moment 84).

The only minor quibble is if Planetary, which was a Wildstorm comic, makes it, and the Vertigo stuff makes it, why couldn’t the pre-DC stuff for, say, Charlton, Fawcett or Quality not make it? However, the only things I can really think of out of that bunch that might make it is either a Captain Marvel origin or the Plastic Man origin. Plas especially “Pushing, always pushing me, until I decided to push back, but you’ve given me a different outlook!” Like I said, minor, minor quibble.

And I HAD to vote for the WE3 moment. It’s possibly my favorite comic ever (definitely fave mini ever). Makes me cry every time. However, I’ll point out I believe that you have the original comic page above, and they change it just slightly in the trade — they make “run no more” all in one balloon, where it’s split here. I think it works better in trade, but then, I encountered the trade first (odd, I know). The notion that there will be an Absolute WE3 with 10 new pages makes me giddy.

See, here’s the thing: whatever your opinion of Jason Todd (I’ll admit my bias up front, I happen to love the character) his death was an incredibly iconic moment in comics history. It’s why I’m surprised Batman holding Jason’s body is not up there.

Having done a good deal of research on the event of the fans voting and the ensuing negative press and outcry because it all fascinates me, the fact remains that it was a huge moment both inside and outside of comics. When you have Denny O’Neil admitting he feared for his life (he says it on the DC documentary ‘Robin’s Requiem: The Tale of Jason Todd’) because of potential backlash due to the killing of Robin.

Outside of comics, it generated a lot of press – editorials at the time derided the medium for its use of the vote. Inside the fandom, it created a lot of controversy; which is why his return was so controversial. Everyone has an opinion on it — they either love it or hate it. It is the second most important thing to happen to Batman, after his parents’ death, and the Batverse today would not be the same without it occurring. Over the years, throughout Batman comics, it has touched each and every character in the Batverse in different ways: from Tim Drake, who used to talk to Jason’s memorial; Dick Grayson, who nearly beat the Joker to death after being taunted by the Joker about Jason; Alfred Pennyworth, who had to put away all pictures of Jason; Cassandra Cain, who stood with Bruce at Jason’s graveside on his 18th birthday; and Stephanie Brown, who was warned she was just as reckless as Jason.

So absolutely, this moment deserves to be in the Top 10 moments in all of the DCU. Whatever your opinion might be, you cannot deny the impact it had both inside the comic fandom and outside of it.

This really was an awesome list. Enjoyed reading some of my favourite moments on here, and it was useful to finally read a few scenes you always hear about but missed at the time. Good work mate.

It was also surprising that Jason Todd’s dead body being discovered by Batman didn’t make it on there. I figured that was a pretty memorable moment – the day the DC readers found out they killed a character.

“Dozens of Westerns and dozens of War comics, many that spanned decades, and only one moment from them all. Sheesh.”

But these things aren’t real. They didn’t happen. They’re just stories. ;-)

“With all due respect, I don’t see how anything but the Death of Superman could be #1.”

This may have been one of the most SIGNIFICANT moments to the industry or the public. But memorable as a work of writing or art? As a turning point in the character’s life (a la the death of Gwen Stacy)? No.

I’m guessing a Batman moment will be no. 1. Batman always wins these polls.

[...] Today is the last day for you to vote for the most memorable moments in DC Comics History, so click HERE and make your [...]

Everyone bought Superman #75, and the very few who read it, sold it.

Peter Chewning

August 8, 2010 at 9:26 am

“One Punch”

Batman … Belted…Him!

I Missed It.

In the words of Stan Lee. ‘Nuff Said.

Always impressed with the amount of work and time that goes into these lists and moments, Brian. Thanks for all the great reading — and reminders of what to re-read., whether I agree with “importance” of the moments or not.

Dick Grayson loses one relationship, gain a new, unhealthy one

Really, Brian? THAT’S how you’re choosing to summarize one of the best super-hero origin stories ever? I realize that this was probably meant in jest, but Dick Grayson being found by Batman was the BEST possible thing that could have happened to him after his parents died. The only place where Batman helping Dick Grayson is anything but a positive thing is in All-Star Batman & Robin, where Batman is clearly a complete psycho.

Like I said, I know this was most likely a joke, but it left a bad taste in my mouth when I read it.

If I could, I would vote for the death of Supergirl a thousand times.

I’m hopeful that one day DC will decide to rehash that story the same way they’ve rehashed many others.

When Dr. Manhattan kills Rorschach, it could be interpreted that he leaves a bloody Rorschach drawing, but if you look carefully, it is the same shape blood splatter that’s on Comedian’s badge and reappears as a ketchup stain on a smiley-face shirt.

I think lists like these are so bad because they don’t include many of the truly memorable moments because too many of the people voting on these things are far too young to remember anything past the last five years, they haven’t read many comics but voted anyway or they are are such hardcore fans of certain characters or writers that they vote for those despite there being more memorable moments to consider. What’s so unfortunate is that far too many people will regard this list as OFFICIAL.

[...] Book Resources wants fans opinion on the 75 greatest moments in DC [...]

Good list. Ticks me off how many of these are invalidated by later story lines. Death of ____. Fooey.

Some things that are worthwhile: Hal Jordan’s rebirth, Flash’s trial, first Justice League, Wonder Woman readmitted to JLA, etc. Moments of things set right, from prior goofs.

Hey, Bryan! when was the nominating vote stage anyway?

You keep saying that people had a chance to vote for this or that.

Yet you’re fending off comment after comment here about what’s not on your list. I suggest you back it up a little, because there are alot of people who may have just started to notice this list… and do a round of wildcard moments to add to the vote.

Hey, Bryan! when was the nominating vote stage anyway?

A couple of weeks ago – that’s when people had a chance to get in the moments that they’re complaining about not being here (and they did not do so, like Hal Jordan’s return, as a for instance).

Some great moments not covered above:
* Superman’s eulogy, as opposed to the actual death, of Supergirl
* The often referenced JSA refusing to reveal their secret ID’s to HUAC, from Adventure Comics
* In Planet Krypton, Batman being emotionally detached from the shades until he sees Kathy/Batwoman
* The Golden Age Batman unmasks to Catwoman in Brave and the Bold
* While since negated, Rick Flag’s death scene in Sucide Squad
* Cassidy listens to a goth vampire go on for a bit and then calls him a wanker, in his Preacher Special

The formation of the JLA was one of the options that folks voted on. Out of 77 possible choices, it came in 52nd.

Some great moments not covered above

Andy, you’re doing it all wrong.

You’re not supposed to say “here are some other great moments that no one has mentioned yet” or “here is a moment I wish was mentioned.” You’re supposed to say, “This list is bullshit if it doesn’t have the time that Black Condor and the Ray teamed up to fight the White Eagle in The Ray #21.”

Wait, it doesn’t have that Ray/Black Condor team up?

What a bullshit list, Cronin. I don’t know why you even bother trying to provide free entertainment for us. Obviously, you’re wrong if you don’t agree with us 100%.

FE, btw.

I do like Andy’s mention of the Planet Krypton moment. Since I’m unaware of anything DC is doing with Hypertime, however, it’s become a moment that has no impact on the present. Doesn’t mean it isn’t awesome, tho.

Not unlike that issue of JLA Classified with the “Super Buddies”/”Formerly JLA” and the devastating end of the one issue where they’re leaving hell and the team is Orpheus and Ice is Eurydice, if you know what I mean, Greek myth style. Beautiful work. Not a serious team my ass.

I still wonder how two moments from the same page in batman 244 are mentioned. Methinks there’s some rigging going on here

http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/5108/jlafoundingsekowskyross.jpg

Wait a minute, it was BATMAN who suggested they stick together as a team? I forgot that! I doubt very much that will be the case when they get around to doing the JLA movie (you know they will if AVENGERS is a success at the box office). Grim Loner Batman being nice and friendly? Come on! :D

You’re not supposed to say “here are some other great moments that no one has mentioned yet” or “here is a moment I wish was mentioned.” You’re supposed to say, “This list is bullshit if it doesn’t have the time that Black Condor and the Ray teamed up to fight the White Eagle in The Ray #21.”

This list is missing the issue in which Superman and Big Barda made a porn movie, therefore it is bullshit

:P

[...] Comic book resources has a great poll on the greatest moments in DC universe history. Two of the moments (22 and 87) inspired scenes in Batman Begins. Great Stuff here [...]

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