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Comic Book Legends Revealed #283

Welcome to the two-hundred and eighty-third in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous two hundred and eighty-two.

Comic Book Legends Revealed is part of the larger Legends Revealed series, where I look into legends about the worlds of entertainment and sports, which you can check out here, at legendsrevealed.com. I’d especially recommend you check out this installment of TV Legends Revealed to see the odd fate of the final episodes of Ellery Queen (plus, did Julie Newmar, of Catwoman fame, really come up with a nasty rebuke of Michael Dunn, of Dr. Loveless fame?)!

Follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter and on Facebook (also, feel free to share Comic Book Legends Revealed on our Facebook page!). As I’ve promised, at 2,000 Twitter followers I’ll do a BONUS edition of Comic Book Legends Revealed during the week we hit 2,000. So go follow us (here‘s the link to our Twitter page again)! Not only will you get updates when new blog posts show up on both Twitter and Facebook, but you’ll get original content from me, as well!

Let’s begin!

COMIC LEGEND: Chuck Dixon planned on having Tim Drake become Blue Beetle for a few months while Stephanie Brown became Robin.

STATUS: True

By late 2001, Chuck Dixon had already made Ted Kord, the Blue Beetle, a recurring character in the pages of Birds of Prey. Ted had pretty much retired as Blue Beetle by this point.

Ted played a prominent role once again in 2002 during the Joker’s Last Laugh crossover by Dixon…

Ted particularly seemed to have strong interactions with Robin (Tim Drake).

As it turns out, that was all quite intentional as Dixon originally planned for a storyline where Tim Drake would actually take OVER as Blue Beetle!!!

The idea was that, for whatever reason, Tim would quit as Robin (this would all be in the issues leading up to 2002’s Robin #100) and become the new Blue Beetle under Ted Kord’s guidance. Batman would choose Stephanie Brown, Spoiler, to become the new Robin. This would involve a six-issue Blue Beetle mini-series starring Tim and Ted, and after it was all over, some crisis or another would drag Tim back to being Robin. Having someone become the new Blue Beetle, though, would inspire Ted to basically franchise out the name to other heroes, who he would then coordinate. This would be in a new ongoing title (presumably also by Dixon).

DC turned Dixon down repeatedly, and eventually Dixon left to go write for Crossgen.

In 2004, DC ended up doing a variation of Dixon’s idea, with Stephanie taking over as Robin for a short period in time before a crisis (which involves Stephanie’s death!) drags Tim back to being Robin.

And then in 2005, well, Blue Beetle did not fare so well, either…

Chuck Dixon has spoken about this story in a few places, so thanks to Chuck for being so forthcoming with this unused story idea (I guess he knows that it really wouldn’t be something he could do in the future, what with Ted dead and all, so he might as well share it with the public). Thanks to reader Jon for suggesting this one!

COMIC LEGEND: Squirrel Girl was created by Steve Ditko decades before her first appearance in 1991.

STATUS: False

Reader Rian wrote to me last year to ask about a story he had seen about Squirrel Girl that had made the claim:

Legend has it that the Squirrel Girl story was originally drawn by Steve Ditko years if not decades before it was actually published in 1992. As the story goes, the story was originally drawn and completed by Ditko, but went unused and sat in a drawer until Marvel needed a story to fill out its anthology series Marvel Super-Heroes Special. The old unused Squirrel Girl story was pulled out of the drawer, had dialogue written for it appropriate to 1992, and was finally published. Since the original art and story had an old Silver Age touch that didn’t take itself seriously was published in the grim and gritty nineties, the story was notable for how out of place it felt.

Now, since Rian wrote to me, he himself has figured out the answer at his own blog, Full Body Transplant, but hey, I’m still going to answer it!

Here are some pages from Squirrel Girl’s first appearance, scripted by Will Murray and drawn by Steve Ditko (which came out in 1991’s Marvel Superheroes #8)…

And, of course, the great ending where she defeats Doctor Doom…

And her glorious send-off line, “I don’t need luck. I eat nuts.”

As it turns out, no, this was not some old Steve Ditko story, but an intentional attempt by writer Will Murray to create a character who DID seem out of place in the modern “grim and gritty” world. She was not even originally meant to be drawn by Steve Ditko!

Will Murray gave the dish to Richard Vasseur at Jazma Online last year:

I created Squirrel Girl in script form without any artist input. Tom Morgan was originally going to draw it, but when he dropped out, I requested Ditko and got him. Ditko did a great job in bringing my baby to life. He invented that knuckle spike. It wasn’t in the script. I based Squirrel Girl ironically enough on a long–ago girlfriend who read comics and was into “critters”—wild animals of all types. Coincidentally, she was big Ditko fan. I think I got the idea because I had a bunch of squirrels running around my roof and sometimes coming in through my open bedroom window and inspiration struck.

By a strange coincidence, although I never described SG physically in my story, Ditko somehow managed to capture the likeness of my old girlfriend.

So there you go! The secret origin of Squirrel Girl! Since her first appearance, she has become quite the cult hero, especially due to the work of writer Dan Slott. Heck, she’s even set to appear in New Avengers soon!

Thanks to Rian for the suggestion, thanks to Richard Vasseur and Will Murray for the information, and thanks to Will Murray and Steve Ditko for creating such a neat character (let’s throw in a thanks to Dan Slott, too, for his work in making Squirrel Girl such a popular character)!

COMIC LEGEND: A centuries-old woodcut drawing intended for the first issue of Matt Wagner’s The Demon mini-series was accidentally omitted, leaving a drawing oddly blank.

STATUS: True

When Matt Wagner began work on his The Demon mini-series in the late 1980s, he was certainly inspired by Jason Blood’s appearance in Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, but he also had a brand-new idea of his own, to tie in the Demon Etrigan with the demon Belial.

Part of Wagner’s fascination was that he actually found an old German woodcut drawing of Belial from the 15th Century and it really DOES look like Etrigan!

Check it out…

So Wagner planned on putting the print into a key scene early in The Demon #1, where Jason Blood’s girlfriend, Glenda Mark, confronts him by showing him the ancient drawing of what looks to be Etrigan. However, this is what we got instead…

Wagner, at the time, was still pretty new to stuff like comic book production at DC, so while he sent in the print to be used, it never got its way into the comic.

Luckily for Wagner, since this WAS a story about demons and magic and the like, it seemed pretty believable that the book was only visible to Jason, so no one really seemed to notice the mistake. Until, of course, Wagner pointed it out himself in a neat interview with Al Nickerson in Back Issue a few years back.

Thanks to Wagner and Nickerson (and just a general thanks to Michael Eury for making Back Issue so awesome!) for the information!

Okay, that’s it for this week!

Thanks to the Grand Comics Database for this week’s covers! And thanks to Brandon Hanvey for the Comic Book Legends Revealed logo!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com. And my Twitter feed is http://twitter.com/brian_cronin, so you can ask me legends there, as well!

As you likely know by now, in April of last year my book came out!

Here is the cover by artist Mickey Duzyj. I think he did a very nice job (click to enlarge)…

If you’d like to order it, you can use the following code if you’d like to send me a bit of a referral fee…

Was Superman a Spy?: And Other Comic Book Legends Revealed

See you all next week!

61 Comments

So instead of becoming the Blue Beetle, Tim Drake eventually became Red Robin?

(I feel there’s some additional connection in there somewhere in the backstory of the two characters, but can’t quite phrase them)

interesting idea Dixon had about Kord franchising out the BB identity – sort of like what’s happened with The Web in DC’s Red Circle characters!

Hasn’t Batman done that very thing in the new “Batman Inc” series? Sounds like DC took the whole earlier idea and simply applied it to another character.

Instead of one Robin becoming a Legacy hero and then the original hero franchising out his name, another Robin did it. From Tim Drake and Blue Beetle to Dick Grayson and Batman. I wonder if Grant Morrison reads this blog, because I’d love to see him comment on the similarities.

Kate Micucci for Squirrel Girl in the inevitable Disney movie.

That Blue Beetle series sounds like it would have been something I enjoyed very much. I loved his work with Ted in BoP, and with Tim in Robin.

I’d no idea Squirrel Girl had ever made a reappearance…

Jack Kirby based the Demon’s “look” on a mask worn by Prince Valiant in a sequence drawn by Hal Foster.
Apparently, Foster saw that illo or something similar while doing his own research.
BTW: You mention it in comic-book-legends-revealed-189!

But I’m with Jason… I don’t really see the resemblance. (For shame, Ms. Marks! “All those yellow demons look alike to me.”) ;)

Jack Kirby based the Demon’s “look” on a mask worn by Prince Valiant in a sequence drawn by Hal Foster.
Apparently, Foster saw that illo or something similar while doing his own research.
BTW: You mention it in comic-book-legends-revealed-189!

Oh yeah, I’m not saying Kirby based the Demon on Belial (especially because, as you note, I did a bit on where Kirby DID get his look), just that Belial looks like the Demon. It’s a funny coincidence that I’m sure Wagner took notice of and decided to work it into the story.

I’ve been wondering about Squirrel Girl’s origin for years, given that that iteration of MSH was a dumping ground for inventory stories. Thanks for clearing that up.

The Squirrel Girl legend is obviously false based simply on the visuals in the story: the design of Iron Man’s armor is clearly the 1988 “return to red & gold” or “coffeepot armor” version that was the immediate successor to the Silver Centurion armor–you can tell the difference from the classic red & gold by the bulkier boots and gauntlets and the red “shoulder pads”. Unless the legend is that Marvel wrote 1990s-appropriate dialogue AND had Ditko or another artist update all the Iron Man images, it’s false on that criteria alone.

Squirrel Girl rocks!

Jack Kirby based the Demon’s “look” on a mask worn by Prince Valiant in a sequence drawn by Hal Foster.
Apparently, Foster saw that illo or something similar while doing his own research.
BTW: You mention it in comic-book-legends-revealed-189!

Oh yeah, I’m not saying Kirby based the Demon on Belial (especially because, as you note, I did a bit on where Kirby DID get his look), just that Belial looks like the Demon. It’s a funny coincidence that I’m sure Wagner took notice of and decided to work it into the story.

Actually, I’m saying the classically-trained Foster was probably inspired by a similar image.
Kirby was then inspired by Foster.
Wagner went back to the source (or something similar) that inspired Foster, and thru him, Kirby!
It’s a “six degrees of separation” thing.
It’s just fun to trace the “lineage”, as it were, of the character’s design!

BTW, you can find the color Sunday strip introducing the yellow-Demon-masked Val here… http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e5/Princevaliant122537.jpg

The Squirrel Girl legend is obviously false based simply on the visuals in the story: the design of Iron Man’s armor is clearly the 1988 “return to red & gold” or “coffeepot armor” version that was the immediate successor to the Silver Centurion armor–you can tell the difference from the classic red & gold by the bulkier boots and gauntlets and the red “shoulder pads”. Unless the legend is that Marvel wrote 1990s-appropriate dialogue AND had Ditko or another artist update all the Iron Man images, it’s false on that criteria alone.

Yeah, that was part of the legend – that they just updated Iron Man’s armor as well as putting new dialogue. The main aspect of the legend is the idea that Squirrel Girl was Ditko’s idea – when you look at it from that perspective, it seems believable that Will Murray was brought in later to script the story to update it. But once you know Murray was the one who came up with it, it is clear that it was not an old Ditko story updated.

Actually, I’m saying the classically-trained Foster was probably inspired by a similar image.
Kirby was then inspired by Foster.
Wagner went back to the source (or something similar) that inspired Foster, and thru him, Kirby!
It’s a “six degrees of separation” thing.
It’s just fun to trace the “lineage”, as it were, of the character’s design!

Oh yeah, gotcha. Yeah, you’re almost surely right.

I would much prefer to have seen Chuck Dixon’s story rather than the derivative versions of it that involved: killing Stephanie, killing Ted, “killing” Batman, demoting Nightwing to replacement Batman and booting TIm out in favor of a newly created Mary Sue.

Chuck Dixon’s Birds of Prey was fantastic, and I love the way Gail Simone respects and continues it. I wish someone with her talent and appreciation for good storytelling had picked up Nightwing after Dixon left.

It’s nice to see a Legend bit about Matt Wagner, as he’s one of my favorites.

Bring on MAGE III ;-)

Seeing Squirrel Girl makes me wonder if Disney is headed in the wrong direction by buying Marvel. They are trying to attract the boys, but I think they should focus on the girl market they already have. I could definitely see Squirrel Girl and Wasp dolls (with various outfits) selling amazingly well.
Also, Disney could exploit the female comic reader/manga reader with digests of the adventures of Squirrel Girl, Wasp, Dazzler, etc. Dazzler would be a prime candidate for the romance comic/woman pursuing singing career, and just downplay the super-hero trappings.

I am nervous to see what happens to Squirrel Girl in New Avengers. I am expecting a violent death to prove that the inherent silliness of super-heroes is wrong. Oh well.

One of the things I had to admit recently was the events of Avengers Assembled, Identity Crises and Infinite Crises actually made me stop buying monthly comics. I liked the Vision, Scarlet Witch, Ant-Man, Sue Dibney, Blue Beatle and probably a lot more who became canon fodder for the new regime. The idea Chuck Dixon had for Blue Beatle sounds a lot more interesting than the smelly corpse with the smellier storyline(s) we got instead.
I was watching PUSHING DAISIES recently and noticed a plot point that could have easily gone the other way. I will try to avoid spoilers.
Chuck has been brought back from the dead by Ned, but can’t tell her shut-in aunts, Lillian and Vivian, without exposing Ned’s ability to bring the dead back to life.
Now here is the dilemma: how do we create tension of Chuck being discovered alive by her aunts if all she has to do is avoid her aunt’s neighborhood since they never leave the house? So how do we get them out of the house?
The Marvel/DC way would be to have Villain X break into the aunt’s house, violently kill Vivian (maybe toss in rape, we are dealing with women) and have Lillian flee the house for her own safety. Hey, we could even have Lillian stay in Ned’s apartment building, making bumping into Chuck more immenent! Such drama!
Instead, the writers had Vivian go outside singing “Morning has broken” by Cat Stevens. She has decided she can’t be a shut-in and be depressed any more. Lillian follows her. The scene is one of hope. The sisters go swimming. Since the sisters are now roaming free, Chuck could be discovered.
The end result is the same, just different ways to get there. I ramble too much…

Squirrel Girl has freaky eyes!

I couldn’t figure out why Iron Man says, ‘At least it rhymes,’ when SG introduces herself. I take it in the Americas, squirrel is pronounced ‘squirl’? In which case it’s even cooler. (Although I suppose you could pronounce girl as ‘girrul’.)

Brian from Canada

October 22, 2010 at 1:07 pm

Hayes:

Disney’s not wrong in wanting Marvel: ratings clearly show that boys aren’t interested in the teen girl “celebrity-as-sitcom” formula of Lizzie McGuire/Hannah Montana/etc. on Disney Channel when it’s transferred to boys for “their” channel, Disney FX. REAL superheroes are the ones the boys are interested in, and Disney’s complete lost there — just look at how they handled CrossGen.

That said, you’re definitely right about the ability to reach girls. I think too many people underestimate some of the Marvel females that aren’t token girls or vicious killers as good characters to approach girls with — in ALL comics. Meridian is a great one for young girls, and Marvel/Disney should look at that. Runaways also has strong female characters that could reach teens. (Squirrel Girl, though, is something I sincerely doubt!)

But — seriously — who hasn’t seen a potential Dazzler movie now that we have a rash of pop singers? Hillary Duff wouldn’t be a bad choice for Alison Blair, neither would Ashley Tisdale or Christina Aguilera (depending on how bad Burlesque is). Drop most of the superhero stuff and the story between her and her father would make a great underpinning to a superhero movie for girls!

Brian from Canada

October 22, 2010 at 1:11 pm

Chalk me up as another person who would prefer to see the Chuck Dixon vision come to pass. Dixon understood that each of the characters has to be treated in their own right, rather than accessories that the Bat-office can play with whenever they need a crossover — which is why Birds Of Prey and Nightwing were so strong in developing their leads and support casts, not to mention building that very adult relationship between Dick and Barbara.

It’s too bad DC has decided the 80s characters must die. This blog more than anything shows that weak characters, brought back years later when there’s a good idea for them, makes them all the more stronger — as we saw with characters like Blue Beetle before editorial stepped in. (Not that I’m disliking the new BB, but Kord still had a following — as did Elongated Man.)

Boy, that Tim Drake as Blue Beetle arc sounds about 1,000% better than the direction they actually went. I wonder why DC rejected Dixon’s proposal?

Much as I enjoyed Dixon’s Batman I LOVED his Nightwing and BoP!

Holy hell, Ditko may be a legend, but that Squirrel Girl rendering is the most horrific thing I have eve seen!

Interesting, Murray said “Ditko somehow managed to capture the likeness of my old girlfriend.” She had a long, bushy prehensile tail?

I can tell you that when Ditko quit drawing Spider-Man he ended up drawing any and every super hero in the book.He was(is) such a great story-teller but the figures and backrounds leave alot to wish for.He would sometimes have a great inker that would flesh out his drawings and make for a much better look.Speedball,I think, came the closest to his Spidey look,but this Squirrel Girl is kind of sad.But dont get me wrong.I Love Ditko.

Well, I’m guessing Ditko probably saw this as “hack work”, to a degree. I mean, there’s no large word balloons full of philosophical ramblings about right and wrong black and white, right? :)

But Squirrel Girl is awesome. Check out the Deadpool/GLI Summer Special from a few years back, where the one squirrel is talking to the camera. She was also in an I “Heart” Marvel book, Masked Intentions (iirc) where she’s mooning over Speedball (which, I just realized, is probably intentional that she has a thing for Speedball since Ditko drew them both…).

The best part of that Demon thing is that it works, maybe BETTER without the image tipped in. Without the image it makes Glenda seem crazy and Blood’s “I don’t see the resemblance” comment seems to work better.

I’d seen something about Tim Drake and Ted Kord before, maybe in that Blue Beetle book that, I think, TwoMorrows put out a few years back. The only thing I’d say is that if there WAS a BB franchise, we might not have gotten Jaime’s book, and that would’ve been a shame, as I’ve found most of the Blue Beetle book in back issue bins for cheap and it’s a cool, fun book.

So, does Ditko have some connection to the Demon? He’s got a connection to the other 2 legends this week. Good stuff as always.

Wasn’t there a Squirrel Girl or similar character in the old Tick cartoon back in the day? The Tick was training new superheroes in it or something.

I love SG and like Ditko, but jeebus his drawing of her looks like he’s trying to draw Pennywise instead…

“So, does Ditko have some connection to the Demon? He’s got a connection to the other 2 legends this week.”

Sole artist on the character in solo action in DETECTIVE 483-485. Not all that interesting, but it’s still a connection.

I love Squirrel Girl, and I have a huge man-crush on Steve Ditko, but ye Gods ,his original SG designs will hanut my nightmares. She’s going to eat my soul!

@E. Wilson:
remember: she eats nuts.

“I am expecting a violent death to prove that the inherent silliness of super-heroes is wrong.”

You’re thinking DC Comics. As this very column points out, fun-loving heroes like Beetle or Spoiler just won’t do over there anymore. Off with their heads! :(

While I like Squirrel Girl, I think the “she can beat ANYBODY!” gag has been run into the ground. Otherwise why don’t they call HER for help instead of an army of heroes everytime someone like, say, The Chaos King shows up?

On the other hand I DO agree that she would make a great Teenage Girl show character. They could play the angle of “unpopular girl at school by day, becomes a superhero by night, to help her self-steem!” She would probably spend more time stalking boys she likes than fighting crime, but hey that’s what those shows are all about. You could still have the occasional Marvel Hero or Villain do a cameo, however.

Does Squirrel Girl speak funny, or is it hard to hear inside that helmet that Iron Man has to repeat almost everything she says?

Does Squirrel Girl speak funny, or is it hard to hear inside that helmet that Iron Man has to repeat almost everything she says?

I think he’s repeating them out of incredulity. You know, like, “Did she seriously just say ‘I don’t need luck. I eat nuts’??!”

Squirrel Girl at least had its interesting elements. But stop telling us what current writers planned on doing with current characters. What we see on the stands is bad enough, I don’t want to hear about some lame idea some writer had that didn’t make it.

Sadly, Allen, you will likely have to toil through reading such stories in future Comic Book Legends Revealed. I know, I know, your burden is a terrible one, but it is still one that you must bear.

Okay Brian, you have shamed me. I’ll continue to read future installments, and take one for the team.

Excellent!

For someone whose art was so great on early Spider-Man, I agree, he either suffered from “phoning it in” or really couldn’t produce by this time..I remember some of his other work in the 80’s in it was atrocious..I don’t know how it even got published, by then it’s not like his name had marquee value or anything..Maybe Marvel actually was showing loyalty by giving him jobs?

For the Squirrel Girl job, Murray notes that he specifically requested Ditko to draw it when the first artist dropped out.

Ditko is erratic but I don’t think it’s due to any physical impairment that I’m aware of, it’s because his interest level varies. I just read Act 5 by him and the art is really very, very good, along the lines of indie cartooning, not commercial comics drawing. What hurts much, not all, of his current work is the failure to provide a compelling story to go along with the Objectivist philosophy. I mean, the Question and early Mr. A stories were well drawn and written, so it’s not like Ditko can’t produce excellent stories.

Allen Smith

Sijo, I think part of the “Squirrel Girl can beat anybody” gag is that no one really BELIEVES her that she’s beaten Doom and whoever else. That to me is where the funny comes in.

Didn’t Dazzler beat a bunch of people like Galactus with what are essentially flashlight powers?

And Iron Man is probably repeating everything to fill in all that blank background space :)

Wasn’t Dazzler one of Marvel’s first Direct Market titles? Was it THE first?

Allen Smith

I’ve figured it out, the Squirrel Girl rendering is a nod to all the Horror comics that Ditko did! SCARY!

“Wasn’t Dazzler one of Marvel’s first Direct Market titles? Was it THE first?”

It was the first time Marvel published the premiere issue of an ongoing comic-book-sized title exclusively through the direct/nonreturnable market. Really doesn’t fit the notion of a “Direct Market title”, though, as subsequent issues of the title were available in the newsstand channel. MOON KNIGHT, KA-ZAR and MICRONAUTS would soon move to direct-only status, while the first true direct-only ongoing comic to debut would have been, IIRC, MARVEL FANFARE.

I agree that the SG art is atrocious — but, frankly, so is the story; if I didn’t know better, I’d swear it was about Iron Man humoring a mentally challenged girl and her fantasies about being a superhero. The author might have wanted her to represent a simpler cultural time, but I don’t see how that level of bare earnestness could have existed outside of DC’s Legion of Superheroes.

And how can we talk about bad art and not mention the cover to Nightwing #63? Robin’s left arm is as big as the rest of his body!

Wait, Miley Cyrus is Squirrel Girl????

Squirrel Girl is pretty scary looking in that story, but it’s not nearly Ditko’s worst work. Not even the worst that I’ve seen, and I haven’t seen nearly all of Ditko’s art.

His work on Legion of Superheroes in the 80s was positively atrocious. Definitely a case of phoning it in. This is my favourite bad panel.

“His work on Legion of Superheroes in the 80s was positively atrocious. Definitely a case of phoning it in.”

More like definitely a case of having ridiculously little lead time to save the schedule. Jimmy Janes started missing deadlines right and left on LSH and Ditko was brought in, sometimes with as little as a single weekend, to turn out a full book’s worth of material. Even given “a full book’s worth of material” meant only seventeen pages in those days, the fact that so much material could be turned out so quickly at all and still be readable, even if not the best in terms of anatomy or detail, is nothing short of heroic.

“…the fact that so much material could be turned out so quickly at all and still be readable, even if not the best in terms of anatomy or detail, is nothing short of heroic.”

Ah, the days when a deadline meant something!
Ditko, Don Heck, John Buscema, and especially Jack Kirby, could come thru in the clinch when a book had to go to the printer NOW!
When Jim Steranko ran late on Captain America V1 #112, Kirby pencilled an ENTIRE 20-page book in THREE DAYS! The book went to the printer on time.
Note, the art in #112 was good enough that Marvel re-used some of it over the years as licensing art!
The next issue (#113), with the Steranko story scheduled for #112, came out on time. It was some of Steranko’s best work EVER. It was also Steranko’s last issue of Cap.

Ditko and Heck both could step in to either pencil OR ink (or both), as needed, to meet emergency deadines…and this was in addition to keeping up their already-established commitments of a compete book plus half-book strip (in Strange Tales, Tales to Astonish or Tales of Suspense) plus a cover or two each!
Kirby was doing a complete book, two half-book strips, plus anywhere between half and almost all of the covers for the company per month!

Kirby did 102 issues in a row of Fantastic Four.
NO fill-ins!
NO missed deadlines!
Let’s see someone do THAT, today!
Not every issue was a “classic”, but he had a better percentage of good/bad than most artists before or since!
‘Nuff said!

Squirrel Girl looked downright SCARY in her first appearance.

I didn’t buy the Legion on a regular basis, but when Ditko was drawing it I tried to get those issues. Wasn’t aware of Dave Cockrum drawing the Legion until after he’d quit, so I missed those issues.

Squirrel Girl is poised for such a massive a comeback. The shirts are already here; we need action figures next. And Tippy Toe bobble-heads.

Is it true that a single reader was responsible for Jason Todd’s death because he programmed his computer to call in and vote every 90 seconds?

The “Robin dies” option won by only 70 votes, so it seems possible.

That would have been an expensive bit of ballot stuffing! (It was a 900 number, wasn’t it?)

Yeah, it’s a great story, but my problem is that even if it IS true, how would you ever really prove it?

Man, I don’t know what everybody’s problem with that Ditko art is. I thought a lot of it was charming, and he was obviously trying to make her look goofy since she is a humorous character.

Also, I think it’s interesting that everyone thinks they would have to “cut out most of the superhero stuff” to get girls interested in Marvel characters. I know plenty of women who are happy just to see strong, well-written female superhero characters, and I’m sure they would have loved to see them when they were thirteen as well.

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