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CSBG Archive

A Year of Cool Comics – Day 319

Here is the latest in our year-long look at one cool comic (whether it be a self-contained work, an ongoing comic or a run on a long-running title that featured multiple creative teams on it over the years) a day (in no particular order whatsoever)! Here‘s the archive of the comics posted so far!

Today begins Uncollected Classics week! Seven days of stories that, well, have never been collected!

We begin with the debut issue of Justice League Quarterly, by Keith Giffen, JM DeMatteis, Chris Sprouse and Bruce Patterson. featuring the first appearance of…the Conglomerate!

Enjoy!

Now this is how you start off a comic book series!! Justice League Quarterly launched by way of a subplot that had been percolating in the regular Justice League America title for a few months. You see, Booster Gold was sick of being treated like a joke, so he quit the JLA. In the first issue of Justice League Quarterly, we discover what he’s been up to – he is forming his OWN superhero team, the Conglomerate!!!

The overseer of the team is Claire Montgomery, who also happens to be Maxwell Lord’s ex-wife!

Watch as she pitches the idea of a corporate-sponsored superhero team…

The team includes Booster Gold, former Justice Leaguer Gyspy, Reverb (brother of former Justice Leaguer Vibe, with the same powers), a character from Mister Miracle called Maxi-Man (an “aw shucks” type guy with enhanced strength, speed, etc.), Echo (force/energy deflector), Vapor (turns into gas) and Praxis (telepathy).

Soon enough, they arrive at the same scene as the Justice League…

When the Conglomerate (or more precisely, Praxis) save the day, they become the new media sensation, which does not sit well with Blue Beetle…

He’s even more dismayed by the brochure Max shows him.

However, the Conglomerate are not fans of how they are being perceived, either…

Things take a turn when the Conglomerate is called into another country to ostensibly help out an oppressed people, but really to protect corporate interests there, leading to the United Nations sending the Justice League after them…

Slowly, the Conglomerate begins to spur their corporate masters, leading to their other corporate liaison to turn to a certain big-headed fellow…

What happens next?

Do the Conglomerate and the Justice League get past their difference?

Are there tons of awesome double-page splashes by Chris Sprouse that I didn’t show you?

The answer to one of those questions is yes (the Sprouse one) – the other two must be answered by you, after you read the issue!

But sadly, it will have to be in the back issue bin/back issue market, as this issue has yet to be reprinted.

21 Comments

The sixth panel on conglomerate7.jpg makes me wonder if this “Claire” is the grown-up version of Molly Ringwald’s character in “The Breakfast Club,” who shares that name.

Very likely!

This was a good story. Sadly I think this was around the time that Giffen’s JLI started its gradual decline.

Since their run finished just about a year after this story (this was at the end of 1990 and their run ended in January 1992), that’s saying a lot that you think their gradual decline was just the last year on the book!

Omar Karindu, from another computer

November 16, 2010 at 7:25 am

Interestingly enough, John Ostrander was doing something similar in Firestorm by creating the “Captains of Industry,” but played (mostly) dead serious. That’s also where Air-Wave II became Maser. The Captains, unlike the original Conglomerate, were mostly villains and dupes like Catalyst and Silver Swan, and a lot of them got their power upgrades from Denny O’Neil’s Mengele-like creation Doctor Moon.

Also, “Red Lectroid from Venus”? Everyone knows Red Lectroids are from Mars by way of the eighth dimension!

cool issue. though think this was the begining of the jla books headed for their decline and dc having to pull the cancel the title and relaunch . plus love how Beetle almost has a brain burst over seeing booster selling out to the corporations. too bad dc does not reprint this

It always astonishes me how many great artists did early work on the Giffen-DeMatties Justice League.

This is my favorite JLI story, hands down. In fact, I think the Conglomerate would be a fantastic book with Giffen or Peter Milligan writing it. And I didn’t see a decline in JLI until they pulled the plug. The decline started with Dan Jurgens on it.

Loved this issue. And it was, like, 80 dense pages of awesome. And I think I dug it out of a dime bin.

Red Lectroids are from neither Mars nor Venus but from Planet 10. “The Martian origin” was used as a cover story when they invaded New Jersey by way of the 8th Dimension in 1938.

[…] A Year of Cool Comics – Day 319 | Comics Should Be Good! @ Comic … Now this is how you start off a comic book series! Justice League Quarterly launched by way of a subplot that had been percolating in the regular Justice League America title for a few months. You see, Booster Gold was sick of being . […]

Bought it new. Re-read it often. I think this was the first time I remembered noticing (seeing?) Sprouse’s work and thinking how awesome it was.

I thought “What Ever Happened to The Caped Crusader” was reprinted in hardback. Am I wrong?

I thought “What Ever Happened to The Caped Crusader” was reprinted in hardback. Am I wrong?

It was.

Is it still included on the list of never been reprinted still?

Are you referring to the list I linked to showing books I’ve already featured? That was just to show you books that have been featured already so you don’t duplicate stuff I have there. It is not a list of books that have never been reprinted.

Sorry. Misunderstood.

I just wanted to mention the uncollected Gang War in Amazing Spider-man from the late eighties.

The decline was when Jurgens and Jones took over the books and the teams changed up to a “classic” line-up spread across both teams.

I thought the mistake was that they tried to keep the comedy but couldn’t do it as well as Giffen/DeMatteis. Add in traditionally “serious” characters (Superman, Hal Jordan, Aquaman, Wonder Woman) and weird character alterations (with Martina Manhunter, Ice and Power Girl most notably), and it didn’t work.

Not to say it was all bad (I liked Destiny’s Hand…felt it was the strongest part of Jurgen’s run), but it certainly wasn’t where it was. And it led to the Morrison JLA, so there was that…

Since their run finished just about a year after this story (this was at the end of 1990 and their run ended in January 1992), that’s saying a lot that you think their gradual decline was just the last year on the book!

Was it that close to the end? really what I remember as the decline is probably the tail end of Ty Templeton’s stretch, but more-so, Glory Bound and Breakdowns. That might have been just a year actually.

Don’t get me wrong though, those stories were still miles ahead of the rubbish Dan Jurgens came out with.

I think there were a bunch of bi-weekly books in 1991, so there was probably more material than normal in 1991, which made it feel longer.

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