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Top 50 Comic Book Writers: #4-3

Here are the next two writers that you voted as your favorites of all-time based on over one thousand ballots cast! Click here to see the artists #4-3 on the countdown. Click here to see a master list of all writers listed so far.

NOTE: Five notable works per creator

4 Warren Ellis – 2338 points (39 first place votes)

Warren Ellis had worked for some small comic book houses in the early 1990s, with the most notable result being his great Lazarus Churchyard series. After a few years, Ellis began working at Marvel, with a notable run on Hellstrom and Doom 2099. His longest run at this time, though, was on Excalibur, where he introduced the world to Peter Wisdom.

After working on a number of projects for Marvel during the mid-90s (including a memorable Thor storyline), Ellis began his longest-running project yet (issue-wise), with his creator-owned series Transmetropolitan, with artist Darick Robertson…

Ellis had already been working for Wildstorm (notably on DV8), but he took his work to a whole new level when he took over Stormwatch (Stormwatch actually predated Transmetropolitan)…

That series led to two of the great comic book series of the late 1990s and 2000s, the Authority…

and Planetary (Planetary was not tied into Stormwatch, it just launched the same time as Authority)…

Since then, Ellis has done a number of creator-owned work for Wildstorm and for Avatar Press, plus he has had some memorable short runs at Marvel, including the brilliant Nextwave (with Stuart Immonen)…

and Thunderbolts (with Mike Deodato).

Ellis continues to work on brilliant creator-owned works for Avatar while also doing standout superhero work for Marvel.

3 Neil Gaiman – 2395 points (40 first place votes)

Neil Gaiman first began to get a name for himself on Black Orchid, with artist Dave McKean…

although he had a VERY memorable showing in a Secret Origins Special where Gaiman did two of the three origins in the comic (short stories that still resonate to this day).

Gaiman then began work on one of the masterpieces of American comic books, with his acclaimed Sandman series…

At roughly the same time, Gaiman took over Miracleman from Alan Moore…

Gaiman did two popular spin-offs of Sandman based on Sandman’s sister, Death…

Since Sandman ended, Gaiman has mostly spent his time on prose work, but he has still done a number of comics, including two limited series for Marvel, one called 1602 and the other one a new take on Jack Kirby’s the Eternals. Gaiman has done a few Sandman projects since the series ended, and he also did a “farewell” to Batman two-parter that got a lot of buzz.

Gaiman continues to do amazing prose work, but I’ll certainly admit that I’d love to see some new comic book stuff from him.

Only two writers remain! You’ll see them tomorrow!

74 Comments

(psst…it’s 1602, not 1606)

Two of my favorites here, and I’m guessing Morrison and Moore are 1 and 2.

My number 1 at number 3… too bad, I hoped Gaiman would place above Moore.

I voted for Ellis as number one, because damn, he’s just too good. Even his subpar stuff is miles better than a lot of other writers who have worked in the business for years. The man is an idea machine, but he never loses track of the most important part of the narrative: character.

My #1 comes in at #3.

One of my choices left…. hoping beyond all hope that Morrison tops Moore, just cuz I voted for Morrison in my number 2 spot.

Moore will be number one, by a long shot.

AverageJoeEveryman

December 21, 2010 at 10:12 am

“and the other one a new take on Jack Kirby’s the Elementals.”

Just a little thing but obviously that should be Eternals.

Yeah, I was just digging through my comics yesterday, and Ellis’s stuff is an amazing chunk of a box or 2. And I didn’t even have Fell in there, and that book is amazing. Hope there’s more someday.

And actually, due to the way I was writing up my list, I ALMOST left Ellis off! Then, luckily I noticed, to the detriment of Kurtzman.

I voted Gaiman high, because I’d just read what I have of Sandman, but you know, I’m not sure I would put him quite so high now. Hmmm. And I just started reading 1602 last night…

Small correction, I believe Gaiman’s Marvel series was titled “1602″ and not “1606″.

“Lazarus Churchyard” non “Graveyard”.

Great stuff. I wrote yesterday that Gaiman didn’t do much besides Sandman, but being reminded of his Miracleman and looking at that Black Orchid cover and thinking of Books of Magic and of the reams of prose he’s written that I love…I’m glad he’s high on this list. Comics is lucky to have such a fine scribe, even if only on an irregular basis.

Love Transmet, Fell and Desolation Jones, and Frankenstein’s Womb was a neat little Ellis gem.

Looks like all my writing picks made the top 50, assuming we know the last two…

I don’t think any of us expects a surprise on the Top 2, but I am curious on the order.

Sometimes I forget that Gaiman used to write comics. Actually, it’s been a while since he wrote a full length adult novel as well.

Glad you mentioned Gaiman’s SECRET ORIGINS issue. The title for his Riddler origin is sheer perfection: “When is a door.”

No surprises here as the top 2 were nailed down & everyone knew whop 3 & 4 would be. Didn’t vote for these 2 as I haven’t read enough to judge – just the odd Transmet & Sandman. I must put that right one day.

I got that Secret Origins Special at the time, snapped it up as soon as I saw the Bolland cover, and I completely forgot Gaiman did two of the three stories.

No surprises, even if I have read quite little from Ellis to have an opinion of him, and ended up not voting for Gaiman despite Sandman being a great book (and Books of Magic and Violent Cases were good too, haven’t read his Miracleman).

Always makes me happy to see someone in the top five who wouldn’t have been in the top five of a similar list made 20 years ago…maybe the field hasn’t long since peaked after all.

I was actually thinking Ellis would have a shitload of first place votes going by Stan Lee’s number. I guess what really happen is that Ellis might not have been number one on too many lists, but everybody respects his talent and put him on the top ten somewhere(at the very least, that was the case for me!). All those numbers add up!

I think that Ellis, despite being a good writer, ranks too high on this list. While his concepts and plots are often amazing his male protagonists always sound the same, and his dialogue seldomly rings true. I tried to read his Astonishing X-Men and couldn’t finish it because of the constant pseudo-witty banter. A little restraint now and then would go a long way towards making his characters more relatable. I will admit that I enjoyed Ministry of Space and almost all of the done-in-one Planetary issues immensely, but that was down to the awesome concepts and Weston’s and Cassaday’s superlative art. His style resembles those of Millar and Morrison, with Millar placing lowest, Morrison highest, and Ellis smack dab in the middle. He’s a good enough writer, just not good enough to place in the Top 5, IMO.

Voted for both of these guys (Gaiman at #3 and Ellis at #9), but still think it’s a joke that Ellis is ahead of Frank and Stan.

But I do fondly remember discovering Warren through his mid-90s Marvel stuff. The first time I recall seeing his name was on Excalibur’s Soulsword trilogy story, which was right before Age of Apocalypse, and quite offbeat. Then I picked up his Thor World Engine issues because I was on the Deodato bandwagon at the time. I’ve never read the Doom 2099 or Hellstorm stuff, is it worth it? Can you actually tell it’s Warren Ellis, or is it more just an interesting curiosity?

@ Third Man: You can definitely tell it’s Ellis on both. Or at the very least, you can see Ellis becoming the writer he is today. They’re good comics, but I don’t know about their availability .

I had to omit Ellis because despite having some great works, he’s largely disappeared up his own arse. Doktor Sleepless was agonizingly bad, and Astonishing X-Men was so boring and decompressed I could have sworn it was ghost-written by Daniel Way. Writers and artists need to constantly challenge themselves and he seems to have written himself into a rut.

They’re both amazing writers.

Warren Ellis is idea man. He is one of the few writers in comics that could write prose science fiction worthy of a Hugo or Nebula award. The only problem I have with Ellis is what others have pointed out: there is a sameness to his protagonists, and he is eternally stuck in ultra-cynical mode. Though he is not as bad as Garth Ennis in the sameness and obrigatory cynicism.

I agree that Gaiman failed to do anything in comics of late that could even approach Sandman, but even if that holds true until he dies, he still deserves his ranking for Sandman only. It’s simply that good, and the haters that decry it as emo whining deserve to die of testosterone poisoning.

I’ve liked Ellis on FreakAngels, where I think he’s done some of the first real character work of his career. I love Nextwave and hold it up as the perfect modern superhero comic. Transmetropolitan as a revelation when I first read it, though now I think it has more to do with Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail being so amazing to begin with, but the Smiler was on my mind when I voted in the 2008 Presidential Election so that book has to count for something. Other than that though, most Ellis has left me cold. Good ideas, but he uses his characters as his personal bullhorn to say often banal things about futurology, sex, drugs, and rock and roll. Overall, I’m starting to tire of the British Comic Writer’s Clic, because even the best of them seem to devote more effort to self aggrandizing than they do to their writing where many of them are content to return to stories and tropes they long ago bled dry.

I am excited for Ellis’s new book with D’Israeli though.

“Death by testosterone poisoning” – Verb: 1) To be locked in a room with only a chair and thousands of copies of All-Star Batman & Robin, Volume 1. Death will occur within 24 hours after victim repeatedly bashes head into wall screaming “I’m the goddamn Batman! I’m the goddamn Batman!”

Where others see cynicism in Ellis’ writing, I see humanism and a sense of wonder.

Ellis’ so-called cynicism is really a product of his humanism. Throughout his work, there’s an underlying message about humanity’s potential for greatness– the cynicism is about humanity’s potential being sabotaged by baser instincts of greed, hatred, and the desire to wield power over others.

I think my first Ellis work was Ruins. That was about the time I got into comics, and at the time I thought it was the greatest thing ever. It is still an interesting read, but kind of suffers as more of the same as I’ve read more Ellis.

@ Julian: I agree, that’s why I think that he should be in the Top 10, but not this high.

Still, I always check his stuff out, and every time a Ellis’ comic is released you get the opportunity to play The Chad Nevett Drinking Game, where you do a shot every time he uses the expression “challenging and thought-provoking” in his review. :-)

The Crazed Spruce

December 21, 2010 at 1:28 pm

I had Gaiman as #1 on my list. I went back and forth between him and Alan Moore. In the end, based on Sandman alone, I feel I made the right choice.

Warren Ellis was in my 11th place tie. His stuff’s just a little too out-there at times, but it’s consistently enjoyable. (Except for New Universal. Just couldn’t get into it.)

Overall, I’m starting to tire of the British Comic Writer’s Clic, because even the best of them seem to devote more effort to self aggrandizing than they do to their writing where many of them are content to return to stories and tropes they long ago bled dry.

That’s been my problem too. The authorial narcissism and superiority complex just bleeds onto the page too much, and this is coming from someone who used to LOVE the Brit writers. Now, I believe ANYONE who writes is a narcissist; I mean to believe that what you have to say is so good, so profound, so worthy of being heard that you make it your life’s work to write down and share your thoughts with as many people as possible? You can’t aggressively pursue writing without being narcissistic on some degree. It’s almost a necessary trait for writers.

The problem with the modern UK writers is that their narcissism and superiority complex is just way too transparent, it practically bleeds off the page and ventures way too often into outright derisiveness (like Mark Millar’s final speech in Wanted). And also, it often comes out way too self-satisfied.

Out of all of them I like Gaiman the best as he can still wed high-concept with relatability, earnestness and character work. He can mix brain and heart whereas many of the other are just brain.

No surprises here as the top 2 were nailed down & everyone knew whop 3 & 4 would be. Didn’t vote for these 2 as I haven’t read enough to judge – just the odd Transmet & Sandman. I must put that right one day. I got that Secret Origins Special at the time, snapped it up as soon as I saw the Bolland cover, and I completely forgot Gaiman did two of the three stories.

Warren Ellis is a hack, and his inclusion on this list, especially that high, completely invalidates this list as anything credible. Anything he has written for Marvel either hasn’t sold or has shedded readers alarmingly fast. That’s more telling. Thunderbolts being the only exception, but that had Deodato on art. That hack can’t keep deadlines, has no respect for the greater writers that came before him, and is even too ashamed to refer to himself as a comic book writer.

When Hollywood optioned Red, you’ll notice that they didn’t ask him to write the screenplay.

Ian –

You certainly can be an humanist without being so fucking judgmental and angry all the time. Ellis’s work would gain in nuance if he allowed softer emotions to seep in once in a while. But who knows? Maybe his anger and judgmental nature are what drives his passion for writing and he wouldn’t be Warren Ellis without them.

But I like the guy despite all that.

Man, this list sure does get invalidated a lot. It would be hard to find writers or artists whose inclusion, exclusion or placement didn’t invalidate the list completely as far as someone or other is concerned.

I have mixed feelings about Ellis myself — I love some of his work, and some of his other stuff bugs me. And that’s fine, really.

“X being on the list completely invalidates this list as anything credible” seems to be the internet version of “I’m taking my toys and going home”.

So please, go home.

I’m always surprised to see Ellis in this high company. I like most of his stuff that I read, but he strikes me as very derivative (not so much from other comics as from standard sci-fi tropes). I really have to try NextWave, though.

Gaiman was high on my list, even though he hasn’t done anything good (imo) in a decade. He seems like a bad parody of himself now. It’s really embarrassing how waif and sappy he can be. BUT—the greatness of Sandman speaks for itself. It’s sort of like how Borges said that James Joyce suddenly became a true master and a “literature unto himself with only one book (Ulysses)”, Gaiman achieved the same within the comics world with Sandman.

Just for a moment, though, I have to say how impressive Moore’s influence is. You have Ellis (#4), who’s a friend of Moore and who obviously was influenced by Moore in a conventional way. Then you have Gaiman (#3), who basically owes his whole career to Moore; Moore gave Gaiman personal recommendations early on, and Gaiman was so taken with what Moore was doing with Swamp Thing that he basically copied that style for the first few years of his career. And then you have Morrison, who also copied Moore in an overt way in the first few issues of Animal Man, and continues to be influenced by Moore to this day–even if that influence shows through in terms of how Morrison tries to directly oppose “what Alan Moore would do”. Oh, and don’t forget how Zenith was basically a Marvel Man knock-off…oh, and how Gaiman was chosen by Moore to be the MIracleman writer after him. It’s so incestuous, this group, and Alan Moore is the daddy figure. Even if Morrison beats him on this list, you have to admit that #s 1-4 wouldn’t even be there were it not for Moore.

Very interesting. I tried to comment but my post never showed up.

Try it again…

I’m always surprised to see Ellis in this high company. I like most of his stuff that I read, but he strikes me as very derivative (not so much from other comics as from standard sci-fi tropes). I really have to try NextWave, though.

Gaiman was high on my list, even though he hasn’t done anything good (imo) in a decade. He seems like a bad parody of himself now. It’s really embarrassing how waif and sappy he can be. BUT—the greatness of Sandman speaks for itself. It’s sort of like how Borges said that James Joyce suddenly became a true master and a “literature unto himself with only one book (Ulysses)”, Gaiman achieved the same within the comics world with Sandman.

Just for a moment, though, I have to say how impressive Moore’s influence is. You have Ellis (#4), who’s a friend of Moore and who obviously was influenced by Moore in a conventional way. Then you have Gaiman (#3), who basically owes his whole career to Moore; Moore gave Gaiman personal recommendations early on, and Gaiman was so taken with what Moore was doing with Swamp Thing that he basically copied that style for the first few years of his career. And then you have Morrison, who also copied Moore in an overt way in the first few issues of Animal Man, and continues to be influenced by Moore to this day–even if that influence shows through in terms of how Morrison tries to directly oppose “what Alan Moore would do”. Oh, and don’t forget how Zenith was basically a Marvel Man knock-off…oh, and how Gaiman was chosen by Moore to be the MIracleman writer after him. It’s so incestuous, this group, and Alan Moore is the daddy figure. Even if Morrison beats him on this list, you have to admit that #s 1-4 wouldn’t even be there were it not for Moore.

I guess the old school guys got left behind by the “graphic novelists” but I’d still rather read comics by Gardner Fox, John Broome and Archie Goodwin (my #3-#5s) than several who made the list. Thank you DC for Showcase Presents.

Its a popularity contest, isn’t it? I just don’t see how anybody’s inclusion can invalidate the list. Anyway, I’m glad that Alan Moore has topped Neil G…. mainly because I greatly prefer AM’s run on Swampie to Sandman, but also because on basis of comics output alone I think AM is a more versatile and humane writer. (Not read prose work of either.)

I’ll be a bit narked if Grant M pips Alan Moore (yes… I know that’s illogical given my first two sentences… but that’s people, for you.)

I think the only Grant Morrison I really enjoyed was Zenith. I wish that was more widely available for a couple of reasons. First because its always sad when work becomes unavailable because of contractual disputes. Second because I’d love to see other peoples views on it. Do I like it because its somehow different to rest of his work? Or because 2000AD format made it easier to follow? Or because I was younger and more receptive? No idea… which is why I’d like to see others views of the work.

Slott is a fine writer, but clearly only around the 60 or 70th best writer. His overly high placement at #44 completely invalidates this list.

Nothing invalidates a list like this. It is how it was voted to be. It’s not even a critic’s list, and most of those are arguable at best. It’s fun, nothing more.

Gaiman’s best and best-known series was Sandman, but let’s not forget that he did the comics Brian listed plus Violent Cases, Mr. Punch, Books of Magic, The Last Temptation, Signal to Noise, and Green Lantern/ Superman: Legend of the Green Flame. All of those comics were at least good, some very good indeed. He’s not just a one (excellent, long-running)- hit wonder.

Ellis can be downright sentimental at times. It seeped into Transmet, Planetary, Orbiter, and even Stormwatch. He doesn’t wallow in emotionalism, but he’s more than just a cynic. There was a time I bought every Warren Ellis comic that came out. Finances have prevented me from doing so in the last 6 or so years, but he’s one of a select few writers I would follow on every project if I could. I haven’t liked everything he’s written, but his batting average remains very high.

ALL-BEARD vs. NO-BEARD!

Hmm…. Nope, not a fan of these two. To each their own.

Yay! Pleasantly surprised that Warren Ellis made this list this high! He and Gaiman are both a bit higher than I put them, but in the same order. I had Gaiman as #6 and Ellis as #7. I also my top two match the official top two, but probably in a reverse order…

It looks like the top of this list is writers I don’t know or have little interest in. I’ve never read Gaiman, so I can’t say anything about him. As for Ellis, I’ve read a few Excaliburs, a couple of Thunderbolts, and an X-Men. There were some nice bits of dialogue, but none of what I’ve seen ranks above ordinary.

Ellis this high is crazy, though I really liked Planetary. Man coming back to comics after the 90s the whole Ennis Ellis Bendis names sounding alike thing was annoying. Thanks again for the list!!

I always thought 1 and 2 were a foregone conclusion. The only question is what order they come in.

@Mary: That’s because you’ve read bits and pieces of some of his weaker work. Nextwave, Transmet, Planetary, and the two arcs he did of Ultimate Fantastic Four are much better.

@Dusty:

What does it mean that “[Warren Ellis] has no respect for the greater writers that came before him?” Is he supposed to start the introduction for everything he writes with the disclaimer “I know this isn’t as good as Watchmen, but…” I don’t even like Warren Ellis that much, but that doesn’t make any sense. How is the reverence a writer holds for other writers a measure of the writing that writer writes?

Given the themes of such works of his as Planetary and Frankenstein’s Womb, it’s quite evident that Ellis has a great deal of reverence for the writers who came before him.

I guess I’ll be dying of testosterone poisoning because I never cared for Sandman. I waded through the series until the last book and couldn’t bring myself to finish it. Sure the Endless and Death are cool but I just wish he found something to do with them. Although I have to say that I found his Books of Magic so stimulating that I’d put it on the top of my favorites list, and his run on Miracleman was surprisingly ingenious. Just when you thought Moore exhausted MM’s possibilities Gaiman miraculously found new innovative material to write about.

You just made my day, Shiny Jim.

I had Gaiman at #3, just behind Moore. In addition to the stunning achievement of Sandman, I loved the Books of Magic (too few people acknowledge how he created Harry Potter) and the Death books.

I really wish people would realize that this is a FUCKING FAVORITES list. It’s not something a bunch of ivory-tower academic critics got together to produce. It’s a list formed by all us no-name schmucks on the Internet. So stating that the inclusion of Warren Ellis (like his shit, didn’t make my list though) “invalidates” this list is patently absurd and insufferably pedantic. So Dusty, stop being a stuck-up hipster and accept the fact that people like things that you don’t. You’re not better than the next prick reading a comic book.

Whoa, calm down Rossie… he may be better than SOME pricks. Did he have Kirby on his lists? Rick Veitch???

Hey guys, don’t worry about Dusty, he’s what we call a troll.

But I did find it funny in Dusty’s post the part where it’s suggested that Hollywood NORMALLY asks the writer of the comic book property to write the screenplay. I don’t know of ANY comic book property that wasn’t outright creator owned where the comics creator had any amount of input on the movie version. Even that, the only thing I can think of right off is Walking Dead and Kirkman, and even there Darabont’s in the driver’s seat, I’m guessing. And it’s not confined to comics; I’m sure that Hollywood didn’t ask Stephen King to write the screenplay of Carrie, or Tom Clancy to write the screenplay of Hunt for Red October, just for 2 examples.

Not so sure about Ellis in the top 10 but fair beans, only really enjoyed Transmet.

T has some interesting ideas on writers…

So that means Haney and Kanigher at #1 and #2? Woo hoo!

No, old man, go away! Go read your Brave and Bolds and Star Spangled War Stories, Mutt, the rest of us don’t think that stuff’s kewl enuff!

Nah, I’m kidding, Mutt. They’re good, but unfortunately aren’t beloved by enough people today.

Anyway, anyone who hasn’t read Ellis should check out Fell, it’s an amazing book, and Fell the character I think has a bit of the cynicism of Ellis but also that humanistic hope that others talked about where the cynicism is due to the anger and frustration that people aren’t being all they can be.

Gaiman and that Secret Origins, oh yeah, that one is a good one.

Oh, yeah, Ellis was my 8 (after almost missing him on my list) and Gaiman was my 4.

I think most of the whole Ellis is too cynical/Ellis has no respect thing comes from the fact that Ellis has no nostalgic love for American superhero comics. Actually reading most of his work reveals a complex humanism that is alternately idealistic and cynical, as well as a vast knowledge and appreciation for a wide variety of creators in many artistic fields.

Personally, I find that refreshing. I wouldn’t want all creators to be like him, but I wouldn’t want all creators to be alike, period. Mainstream comics don’t suffer because too FEW people love the status quo from when they were kids.

Hell, no. Neil Gaiman also has little nostalgic love for American superheroes, and he isn’t ultra-cynical. I’ve read hundreds of prose writers working on fantasy and science fiction that probably have no nostalgic love for American superheroes and only a select few as are cynical as Ellis and Ennis.

I don’t see the relation. Ellis and Ennis are ultra-cynical about so many things, from government to religion, that the fact they’re also cynical about superheroes is a small thing (but quite logical, since they see superheroes as authority figures, and they distrust authority figures in general).

Why this resistance to admit the obvious fact that Warren Ellis is a cynical bastard? I thought that was part of his charm. He is a bit like the Harlan Ellison of comics. Sometimes gets in my nerves, but the medium would be much poorer without him.

Gaiman actually has tons of nostalgic love for American superheroes, hence him getting the Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader gig.

To echo an earlier comment, Gaiman’s ability to write smart, clever stories with heart is what lifts him above the rest of the Brit pack

They were both on my list, but I’m very surprised Ellis came this high. I can’t believe he ranked higher than Ennis.

You can say what you like about Ellis’s writing, but the idea that he hasn’t been good for comics is just demonstrably false. He has used his website and his celebrity to plug tons of amazing creators working outside most people’s radar from Dash Shaw to Brandon Graham and James Stokoe.

I didn’t vote for either of these but I think they deserve their place. Just not my personal favorites. I recently re-read Sandman and it still holds up today. Serial killer convention issue is still a favorite along with the Prez issue. Also read Planetary all the way through in one sitting not that long ago. Truly an amazing piece of work. Maybe Ellis’ best though Stormwatch & Authority will probably always be my favorite work by him. I need to re-read Transmet again someday. Still waiting on an oversize hardcover of Nextwave from Marvel. That series certainly deserves the treatment.

“I really have to try NextWave, though.”

Don’t be in too big a hurry. Ellis clearly thought it was a lot funnier than it actually is. In terms of laughs, i’s got nothing on … well … anything Kyle Baker has ever done …

“Don’t be in too big a hurry. Ellis clearly thought it was a lot funnier than it actually is. In terms of laughs, i’s got nothing on … well … anything Kyle Baker has ever done …”

But in terms of structure, pacing, and possibly overall design, it’s the structurally innovative superhero comic I’ve read from the Big Two in a decade. Ellis and Immommmennnnn * were doin’ stuff with the way stories are told in comics that’s completely unique.

* If you don’t know how to spell someone’s name, misspell it good and hard!

Here’s a test of if you’ll like Nextwave or not. Check out the cover to issue 2.

http://www.comics.org/issue/259912/cover/4/

If you don’t laugh at the bit under Fin Fang Foom, you won’t like Nextwave.

This, of course, is not to knock Kyle Baker. I can think of 2 things just from his Plastic Man that are just as good.

@MarkAndrew:

Bill Kartopopodoplipydips
Bill Scienqkawittzydoo

“I voted for Ellis as number one, because damn, he’s just too good. Even his subpar stuff is miles better than a lot of other writers who have worked in the business for years. The man is an idea machine, but he never loses track of the most important part of the narrative: character.”

I disagree with the last assessment. The one thing Ellis loses is character as in they are all cyphers and/or have the same personality.

He is an idea man. That’s for sure.

Too bad his “idea” is “bluetooth.”

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